Statistics by subject – Children and youth

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All (18)

All (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20040118410
    Description:

    This report, based on data from the 2002/03 Victim Services Survey, provides a profile of victim service agencies in Canada and the clients they served. Data are presented on the types of agencies in Canada, the services offered, staff and volunteers, criminal injuries compensation applications and awards, and client characteristics such as sex, age grouping and type of victimization.

    The report also contains some information on transition homes and shelters for abused women and their children that was collected by Statistics Canada's 2001/2002 Transition Home Survey.

    Release date: 2004-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040037734
    Description:

    This article describes the well-being of off-reserve Aboriginal children aged 14 and under, using data from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) to focus on off-reserve Aboriginal children with respect to health and well-being, education, and learning and use of Aboriginal languages. It is adapted from A Portrait of Aboriginal Children Living in Non-reserve Areas: Results from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-597-XWE).

    Release date: 2004-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040017037
    Description:

    This Health Reports article uses data from the 2003 Canadian Community Health Survey to examine who is most commonly exposed to second-hand smoke, by age, sex, province and health region.

    Exposure is examined by setting, that is, in public places, at work, at home, in private vehicles, and is given in the context of smoking prevalence.

    Release date: 2004-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20040098408
    Description:

    This Juristat provides an overview of young offenders in correctional service programs in Canada in 2002/03. The data in the report represent the final year of youth corrections under the Young Offenders Act as the new Youth Criminal Justice Act came into effect on April 1, 2003.

    The data are drawn from three sources: the Youth Key Indicator Report, the Youth Custody and Community Services Survey and the Alternative Measures Survey. Data from all these sources are analysed at the provincial/territorial and national levels.

    Release date: 2004-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2004003
    Description:

    This multivariate statistical analysis, which captures the number of prior police contacts of young people apprehended by the police, uses longitudinally linked records from the Incident-Based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey for 1995 to 2001.

    Release date: 2004-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20030046976
    Description:

    Cannabis use has increased over the past decade.

    Males, teenagers and young adults were most likely to have used cannabis in the past year.

    Cocaine/Crack was the second most commonly used illicit drug.

    Release date: 2004-07-21

  • Public use microdata: 82M0011X
    Description:

    The main objective of the 2002 Youth Smoking Survey (YSS) is to provide current information on the smoking behaviour of students in grades 5 to 9 (in Quebec primary school grades 5 and 6 and secondary school grades 1 to 3), and to measure changes that occurred since the last time the survey was conducted in 1994. Additionally, the 2002 survey collected basic data on alcohol and drug use by students in grades 7 to 9 (in Quebec secondary 1 to 3). Results of the Youth Smoking Survey will help with the evaluation of anti-smoking and anti-drug use programs, as well as with the development of new programs.

    Release date: 2004-07-14

  • Table: 89-597-X
    Description:

    This article presents information on health, education and language for Métis, Inuit and North American Indian children living in non-reserve areas. It uses the 'children and youth' component of the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS).

    Release date: 2004-07-09

  • Table: 85-224-X20040006985
    Description:

    Using data from the Homicide Survey, this chapter examines the prevalence of and trends in family homicide .It also explores the circumstances surrounding homicides, and the demographic characteristics of accused persons and victims. Finally, information on the aftermath of family homicide will be presented by examining what happened to the accused following the homicide.

    Release date: 2004-07-06

  • Table: 85-224-X20040006986
    Description:

    Until recently, charging and prosecution policies emphasized the need to treat family violence 'like any other crime.' These policies translated into significant challenges for police and prosecutors who became aware of the unique characteristics of family violence such as the sharing of a home and the emotional and financial relationships between the victim and the offender.

    Release date: 2004-07-06

  • Table: 85-224-X20040006983
    Description:

    The definition of child abuse varies among researchers, criminal justice, health and social service professionals. As an example, child abuse is defined differently for criminal law and child protection purposes and, moreover, definitions in the child protection context vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.

    Release date: 2004-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040016876
    Description:

    Profiling children who witnessed violence at home, this article assesses concurrent and longer-term impacts on their levels of aggression and anxiety, using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 2004-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20030036846
    Description:

    This report examines the odds of 12- to 15-year-olds drinking to intoxication and using drugs. It uses data from the 1998/99 National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 2004-05-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20030036850
    Description:

    This article examines which groups have high rates of injury and what activities are most likely to produce injuries.

    Release date: 2004-05-18

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20040038402
    Description:

    This Juristat provides an overview of young offenders in correctional service programs in Canada for 2001/02. Programs include custodial remand, secure and open custody, and community-based programs such as probation and alternative measures.

    Release date: 2004-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2003003
    Description:

    This study examines the health status of Canadian youth (ages 12 to 17) living in the largest metropolitan centres with those living in the northern regions. Information on whether health risk behaviours of urban youth are different from those of rural youth can assist families, policy-makers and local communities to target policies, programs and services at an appropriate geographic level. This analysis can also help to support claims made about youth behaviours or alternatively to dispel myths.

    Release date: 2004-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20040028427
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. The annual Juristat, Youth Court Statistics, 2002/03, summarizes trends from provincial/territorial youth courts across Canada, which provide data to the Youth Court Survey (YCS). In this Juristat, information is presented on the characteristics of cases and accused youth, conviction rates, sentencing trends and related issues. As well, statistics are presented for the 12-year period from 1991/92, the first year for which national data are available for the YCS, to the current year, 2002/03.

    Release date: 2004-03-12

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2003003
    Description:

    Presented here is an analysis of time use and quality of life that allows us to gain a better understanding of the new transitions young people in Canada are experiencing. Based on a gender analysis, the study shows the impact of paid work on young people's schedules while they are still in school, comparing those in high school with those at the postsecondary level. The same analysis is then applied to those having completed their transition to employment, where studying is no longer their main activity.

    The results suggest that men and women encounter somewhat different experiences. One finding pertains to the pace of the transition. While young men enter the workforce earlier and work more intensely, young women experience a combination of several simultaneous transitions, such as entering a conjugal relationship and having children.

    A second finding is related to the impact on time use of paid work while studying. The analysis reveals that re-organizing daily activities is not simply a matter of substituting work hours for study hours; many other areas are impacted by students working, such as sleep and active leisure time. The effects vary depending on the number of work hours. Women at the postsecondary level working more than 20 hours a week sacrifice more study time.

    A third finding looks into changes in attitudes regarding school-to-work transitions. Quality of life and time perception indicators suggest that introducing paid work into young men's schedules is regarded as an overall improvement in their life. Young women, however, seem adversely affected, suggesting that they are more vulnerable to stress induced by schedule conflicts.

    Release date: 2004-02-25

Data (5)

Data (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Public use microdata: 82M0011X
    Description:

    The main objective of the 2002 Youth Smoking Survey (YSS) is to provide current information on the smoking behaviour of students in grades 5 to 9 (in Quebec primary school grades 5 and 6 and secondary school grades 1 to 3), and to measure changes that occurred since the last time the survey was conducted in 1994. Additionally, the 2002 survey collected basic data on alcohol and drug use by students in grades 7 to 9 (in Quebec secondary 1 to 3). Results of the Youth Smoking Survey will help with the evaluation of anti-smoking and anti-drug use programs, as well as with the development of new programs.

    Release date: 2004-07-14

  • Table: 89-597-X
    Description:

    This article presents information on health, education and language for Métis, Inuit and North American Indian children living in non-reserve areas. It uses the 'children and youth' component of the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS).

    Release date: 2004-07-09

  • Table: 85-224-X20040006985
    Description:

    Using data from the Homicide Survey, this chapter examines the prevalence of and trends in family homicide .It also explores the circumstances surrounding homicides, and the demographic characteristics of accused persons and victims. Finally, information on the aftermath of family homicide will be presented by examining what happened to the accused following the homicide.

    Release date: 2004-07-06

  • Table: 85-224-X20040006986
    Description:

    Until recently, charging and prosecution policies emphasized the need to treat family violence 'like any other crime.' These policies translated into significant challenges for police and prosecutors who became aware of the unique characteristics of family violence such as the sharing of a home and the emotional and financial relationships between the victim and the offender.

    Release date: 2004-07-06

  • Table: 85-224-X20040006983
    Description:

    The definition of child abuse varies among researchers, criminal justice, health and social service professionals. As an example, child abuse is defined differently for criminal law and child protection purposes and, moreover, definitions in the child protection context vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.

    Release date: 2004-07-06

Analysis (13)

Analysis (13) (13 of 13 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20040118410
    Description:

    This report, based on data from the 2002/03 Victim Services Survey, provides a profile of victim service agencies in Canada and the clients they served. Data are presented on the types of agencies in Canada, the services offered, staff and volunteers, criminal injuries compensation applications and awards, and client characteristics such as sex, age grouping and type of victimization.

    The report also contains some information on transition homes and shelters for abused women and their children that was collected by Statistics Canada's 2001/2002 Transition Home Survey.

    Release date: 2004-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040037734
    Description:

    This article describes the well-being of off-reserve Aboriginal children aged 14 and under, using data from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) to focus on off-reserve Aboriginal children with respect to health and well-being, education, and learning and use of Aboriginal languages. It is adapted from A Portrait of Aboriginal Children Living in Non-reserve Areas: Results from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-597-XWE).

    Release date: 2004-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040017037
    Description:

    This Health Reports article uses data from the 2003 Canadian Community Health Survey to examine who is most commonly exposed to second-hand smoke, by age, sex, province and health region.

    Exposure is examined by setting, that is, in public places, at work, at home, in private vehicles, and is given in the context of smoking prevalence.

    Release date: 2004-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20040098408
    Description:

    This Juristat provides an overview of young offenders in correctional service programs in Canada in 2002/03. The data in the report represent the final year of youth corrections under the Young Offenders Act as the new Youth Criminal Justice Act came into effect on April 1, 2003.

    The data are drawn from three sources: the Youth Key Indicator Report, the Youth Custody and Community Services Survey and the Alternative Measures Survey. Data from all these sources are analysed at the provincial/territorial and national levels.

    Release date: 2004-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2004003
    Description:

    This multivariate statistical analysis, which captures the number of prior police contacts of young people apprehended by the police, uses longitudinally linked records from the Incident-Based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey for 1995 to 2001.

    Release date: 2004-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20030046976
    Description:

    Cannabis use has increased over the past decade.

    Males, teenagers and young adults were most likely to have used cannabis in the past year.

    Cocaine/Crack was the second most commonly used illicit drug.

    Release date: 2004-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040016876
    Description:

    Profiling children who witnessed violence at home, this article assesses concurrent and longer-term impacts on their levels of aggression and anxiety, using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 2004-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20030036846
    Description:

    This report examines the odds of 12- to 15-year-olds drinking to intoxication and using drugs. It uses data from the 1998/99 National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 2004-05-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20030036850
    Description:

    This article examines which groups have high rates of injury and what activities are most likely to produce injuries.

    Release date: 2004-05-18

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20040038402
    Description:

    This Juristat provides an overview of young offenders in correctional service programs in Canada for 2001/02. Programs include custodial remand, secure and open custody, and community-based programs such as probation and alternative measures.

    Release date: 2004-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2003003
    Description:

    This study examines the health status of Canadian youth (ages 12 to 17) living in the largest metropolitan centres with those living in the northern regions. Information on whether health risk behaviours of urban youth are different from those of rural youth can assist families, policy-makers and local communities to target policies, programs and services at an appropriate geographic level. This analysis can also help to support claims made about youth behaviours or alternatively to dispel myths.

    Release date: 2004-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20040028427
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. The annual Juristat, Youth Court Statistics, 2002/03, summarizes trends from provincial/territorial youth courts across Canada, which provide data to the Youth Court Survey (YCS). In this Juristat, information is presented on the characteristics of cases and accused youth, conviction rates, sentencing trends and related issues. As well, statistics are presented for the 12-year period from 1991/92, the first year for which national data are available for the YCS, to the current year, 2002/03.

    Release date: 2004-03-12

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2003003
    Description:

    Presented here is an analysis of time use and quality of life that allows us to gain a better understanding of the new transitions young people in Canada are experiencing. Based on a gender analysis, the study shows the impact of paid work on young people's schedules while they are still in school, comparing those in high school with those at the postsecondary level. The same analysis is then applied to those having completed their transition to employment, where studying is no longer their main activity.

    The results suggest that men and women encounter somewhat different experiences. One finding pertains to the pace of the transition. While young men enter the workforce earlier and work more intensely, young women experience a combination of several simultaneous transitions, such as entering a conjugal relationship and having children.

    A second finding is related to the impact on time use of paid work while studying. The analysis reveals that re-organizing daily activities is not simply a matter of substituting work hours for study hours; many other areas are impacted by students working, such as sleep and active leisure time. The effects vary depending on the number of work hours. Women at the postsecondary level working more than 20 hours a week sacrifice more study time.

    A third finding looks into changes in attitudes regarding school-to-work transitions. Quality of life and time perception indicators suggest that introducing paid work into young men's schedules is regarded as an overall improvement in their life. Young women, however, seem adversely affected, suggesting that they are more vulnerable to stress induced by schedule conflicts.

    Release date: 2004-02-25

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