Statistics by subject – Children and youth

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All (23)

All (23) (23 of 23 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200511113152
    Description:

    After a period of decline from the late 1980s to mid-1990s, the youth employment rate (aged 15 to 24) rebounded between 1997 and 2004. Most of the jobs were in industries that traditionally hire large numbers of young people, including food services. The article documents the growth in youth employment by age, sex, industry and province.

    Release date: 2005-12-22

  • Table: 85-227-X
    Description:

    This report presents indicators to measure the workload and performance of the criminal justice system, as well as indictors on a number of socio-demographic and economic factors that can be associated with crime and victimization. In this report, workload and volume measures centre on the work of the police, courts, corrections, diversion programs and victim services and changes over time. Examples of workload and volume indicators examined in this report include: the number of criminal incidents known to police; the number of people serviced by alternative measures, mediation, dispute resolution and diversion programs; the number of cases dealt with in court; average counts in corrections institutions, and; the number of persons assisted by victim service agencies. Performance indicators are organized according to the following five general goals of the criminal justice system: 1) Public order, safety and national security through prevention and intervention; 2) Offender accountability, reintegration and rehabilitation; 3) Public trust, confidence and respect for the justice system; 4) Social equity and access to the justice system for all citizens, and; 5) Victim needs served. Examples of performance indicators examined in this report are: the overall cost of administering the sectors of the criminal justice system; the type and length of sentences ordered in court; public satisfaction with the police, the courts, and the correctional and parole systems; the number of applications for legal aid, and; the number of services for victims of crime. The various socio-demographic and economic indicators included in this report are presented in order to present statistical information on the factors that can be associated with crime. These 'context of crime indicators are organized into three broad categories: Community and society, Family, and Individual. Examples of such indicators examined in this report are: the age and sex distributions of the population; income levels and labour force participation; levels of social engagement; levels of gang activity; family structures; levels of child support; levels of education; the rate of literacy, and; the rate of alcohol and drug abuse among the adult and youth population.

    Release date: 2005-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038966
    Description:

    Studies of the postsecondary attainment of young adults are informative, but it is also useful to examine the educational aspirations of teenagers. Such studies profile the value placed on different types of formal education by youth as well as perceived opportunities for upward occupational mobility. This article explores the educational aspirations of 15-year-old visible minority immigrant students and compares them with those of Canadian-born youth who are not part of a visible minority group. It then identifies the most important factors that explain the large ethnocultural differences in university aspirations.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005270
    Description:

    This paper adopts the decomposition technique of DiNardo, Fortin and Lemieux (DFL, 1996) to decompose provincial differences in the distribution of Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) test scores and assesses the relative contribution of provincial differences in the distribution of "class size" and time-in-term, other school factors and student background factors. Class size and time-in-term are both important school choice variables and we examine how provincial achievement differences would change if the Alberta distribution of class size and time-in-term prevailed in the other provinces. Results differ by province, and for provinces where mean achievement gaps would be lower, not all students would benefit.

    Release date: 2005-11-22

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20040018739
    Description:

    For a study on smoking cessation programs, respondents were found via referrals from key informants. A challenge was tracking the calling process and keeping records of information obtained during telephone calls.

    Release date: 2005-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050068650
    Description:

    This annual report is an examination of homicide in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the characteristics of homicide incidents (murder, manslaughter and infanticide), victims and accused within the context of both short and long-term trends. Geographical patterns of homicide are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. Other key themes include international comparisons of homicide, gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, youth homicide and family (including spousal) homicides. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of homicide in Canada.

    Release date: 2005-10-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028454
    Description:

    Using longitudinal data from Statistics Canada's National Population Health Survey (NPHS), this article assesses the health impact of the immigration process, as individuals adjust to life in Canada, by comparing changes in immigrants' self-perceived health status, health care use, and health-related behaviours with those of the Canadian-born population. Information was collected from the same individuals over an eight-year period from 1994-1995 to 2002-2003.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005261
    Description:

    The upbringing of children is modeled as a modified principal agent problem in which children attempt to maximize their own well-being when faced with a parenting strategy chosen by the parent, to maximize parent's perception of family well-being. Thus, children as well as parents are players, but children have higher discount rates than parents. The simultaneity of parenting and child behaviour is confirmed using the 1994 Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children.

    Release date: 2005-08-02

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050058076
    Description:

    The annual report on crime statistics presents an analysis of the police-reported data in 2004. These data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. Data are examined at the national, provincial and territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas by type of crime. The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, other Criminal Code offences, impaired driving, drug offences and youth crime.

    Release date: 2005-07-21

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008648
    Description:

    This chapter will focus on the physical and sexual assaults against children and youth (under the age of 18) that were reported to police services. In addition, other forms of child maltreatment and child abuse are presented including the extent to which children and youth witness violence in the home. System responses to the issue of child maltreatment and violence will be examined, using information from the Transition Home and Victim Services Surveys. As well, recent policy developments to address and improve the situation of family violence against children and youth in Canada will be highlighted.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008646
    Description:

    Using data from the Homicide Survey, the following chapter examines the different circumstances and characteristics of family-related homicides in Canada which occurred. The analysis includes details about spousal homicides, child and youth homicides and family homicides of older persons (65+). This chapter will present data on the characteristics of the accused, the incident and the victim in these homicides.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Articles and reports: 82-620-M20050018061
    Description:

    This article looks at the increase in measured obesity rates among children and youth over the past 25 years. Analysis includes changes by age and sex. Comparisons are made to recent data collected in the United States as well as between provinces and various social and economic characteristics.

    Release date: 2005-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050047948
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. The annual Juristat, Youth Court Statistics, 2003-2004, summarizes trends from provincial/territorial youth courts across Canada, which provide data to the Youth Court Survey (YCS). In this Juristat, information is presented on the characteristics of cases and accused youth, conviction rates, sentencing and related issues. As well, statistics are presented for the thirteen year period from 1991-1992, the first year for which national data are available for the YCS, to the current year, 2003-2004.

    Release date: 2005-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050037946
    Description:

    This Juristat presents a profile of all shelters in Canada that provided residential services to abused women and their children in 2003-2004. Additionally, through the use of a snapshot day survey (April 14, 2004), selected characteristics of residents (i.e., reasons for coming to the shelter, age group, parenting responsibilities, relationship to abuser, involvement of the criminal justice system, etc.) are presented. Data for this Juristat come primarily from the Transition Home Survey (THS), a biennial census of all residential facilities for female victims of domestic violence conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics as part of the federal government's Family Violence Initiative. Questionnaires are mailed to all shelters known to provide residential services to abused women in every province and territory. Information is collected on the characteristics of the facilities and the services provided during the previous 12 months (April 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004). Cross-sectional comparisons and comparisons using time-series data from the THS Trend File are also included. The THS Trend File contains only those facilities that participated in the survey in each of the following years: 1997/98, 1999/00, 2001/02 and 2003/04.

    Release date: 2005-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017033
    Description:

    Delayed marriage, postponement of children, and adults with increasingly long-lived parents have given rise to the 'sandwich generation'. These are individuals caught between the often conflicting demands of caring for children and caring for seniors. Although still relatively small (712,000 in 2002), the ranks of the sandwich generation are likely to grow.

    Release date: 2005-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040037838
    Description:

    The prevalence of and factors associated with having sexual intercourse without a condom and ever being diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease (STD) are examined for youth aged 15 to 24.

    Release date: 2005-05-03

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040037837
    Description:

    What can we say about teenagers who had sexual intercourse at the age of 15 or less? This study estimates the percentage of adolescents who have had sexual intercourse by age 14 or 15. The study also examines demographic, socio-economic characteristics and other factors at age 12 or 13 that are associated with early sexual activity.

    Release date: 2005-05-03

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040037840
    Description:

    This article reports trends over the past decade in rates of smoking, initiation, quitting and relapse among youth. The prevalence of youth smoking is examined in relation to various factors, including parental smoking and smoke-free homes.

    Release date: 2005-05-03

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040037841
    Description:

    The present study examines food insecurity prevalence according to age, sex and province of residence for Canadians aged 12 and over. The characteristics of people most likely to live in a household where there is not enough money to eat, such as education level, income and family type are also presented.

    Release date: 2005-05-03

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050018064
    Description:

    This issue of Juristat presents statistical information on the extent and nature of violent victimization of children and youth in Canada in 2003 as reported to a subset of police services. Rates of victimization are presented for each age and sex. Data describes the different types of assaults perpetrated against children and youth, the weapons used to inflict injury, the injuries sustained and the location and time of the assault relative to various age groups. Other topics included in the report are child pornography, sexual exploitation of children, kidnapping and abduction of children. Data used in this report include police statistics from the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the Homicide Survey and court data from the Adult Criminal Court Survey.

    Release date: 2005-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005247
    Description:

    This study undertakes three comparisons using Cycle 2 (1996-97) data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) in Canada. First, the study compares the health outcomes of children of the Native-born Canadian (NBC) group with those of the immigrant group in general. Differences are also investigated within the three immigrant sub-groups: the American immigrant group, the European immigrant group and Asian immigrant group. Second, this study tests the hypothesis that the children of any immigrant group in Canada would have a higher level of health outcomes for the same level of resources. Third, the study examines the association of time of residency of immigrants in different groups and the health outcomes of their children. An immigrant family is defined as one in which at least one of the parents is foreign-born. Health outcomes are measured by the PMK's (person most knowledgeable about the child) assessment of the child's health. Ordered logit models are employed for estimation. The children selected for analysis are 4 to 13 years of age.

    The NLSCY data suggest that the health outcomes of children in the immigrant families in general are similar to that in the NBC group. However, the health outcomes of the Asian immigrant group are slightly lower and those of the American immigrant group are markedly better. Except for the American immigrant group, there is evidence that the children of any other immigrant group would have lower health status for the same level of resources. Decomposition results indicate that a higher level of observable and unobservable resources is responsible for markedly better outcomes for the American immigrant group; while a lower level of observable and unobservable resources is responsible for the lower level of outcomes for the Asian immigrant group. On the other hand, health outcomes are higher for the European immigrant group than for the NBC group when variation in resources is considered, while lower when variation in productivity coefficients is examined. Finally, there is statistical evidence that the health status of children of immigrant families would improve with the time of residency of immigrant parents, if it were lower initially. The findings of the study indicate that present health outcomes of children in the immigrant families, on average, are not a great concern. However, those of the Asian immigrant group may be a concern.

    Release date: 2005-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040027787
    Description:

    The proportion of mothers who attempt to breastfeed their babies rose from about 25% in the mid-1960s to 85% in 2003. However, just 17% of mothers breastfed exclusively for at least six months, as recommended by the Public Health Agency of Canada.Subjects

    Release date: 2005-03-15

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2005002
    Description:

    This study examines links between changes in relationships with parents and peers during adolescence and adolescent depressive symptoms. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, this study provides insight into: the relationships between youth and their mothers, fathers and friends; how these relationships changed over a two-year period; and how these changes related to depressive symptoms experienced by youth at ages 16 and 17.

    Release date: 2005-02-16

Data (3)

Data (3) (3 results)

  • Table: 85-227-X
    Description:

    This report presents indicators to measure the workload and performance of the criminal justice system, as well as indictors on a number of socio-demographic and economic factors that can be associated with crime and victimization. In this report, workload and volume measures centre on the work of the police, courts, corrections, diversion programs and victim services and changes over time. Examples of workload and volume indicators examined in this report include: the number of criminal incidents known to police; the number of people serviced by alternative measures, mediation, dispute resolution and diversion programs; the number of cases dealt with in court; average counts in corrections institutions, and; the number of persons assisted by victim service agencies. Performance indicators are organized according to the following five general goals of the criminal justice system: 1) Public order, safety and national security through prevention and intervention; 2) Offender accountability, reintegration and rehabilitation; 3) Public trust, confidence and respect for the justice system; 4) Social equity and access to the justice system for all citizens, and; 5) Victim needs served. Examples of performance indicators examined in this report are: the overall cost of administering the sectors of the criminal justice system; the type and length of sentences ordered in court; public satisfaction with the police, the courts, and the correctional and parole systems; the number of applications for legal aid, and; the number of services for victims of crime. The various socio-demographic and economic indicators included in this report are presented in order to present statistical information on the factors that can be associated with crime. These 'context of crime indicators are organized into three broad categories: Community and society, Family, and Individual. Examples of such indicators examined in this report are: the age and sex distributions of the population; income levels and labour force participation; levels of social engagement; levels of gang activity; family structures; levels of child support; levels of education; the rate of literacy, and; the rate of alcohol and drug abuse among the adult and youth population.

    Release date: 2005-12-20

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008648
    Description:

    This chapter will focus on the physical and sexual assaults against children and youth (under the age of 18) that were reported to police services. In addition, other forms of child maltreatment and child abuse are presented including the extent to which children and youth witness violence in the home. System responses to the issue of child maltreatment and violence will be examined, using information from the Transition Home and Victim Services Surveys. As well, recent policy developments to address and improve the situation of family violence against children and youth in Canada will be highlighted.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008646
    Description:

    Using data from the Homicide Survey, the following chapter examines the different circumstances and characteristics of family-related homicides in Canada which occurred. The analysis includes details about spousal homicides, child and youth homicides and family homicides of older persons (65+). This chapter will present data on the characteristics of the accused, the incident and the victim in these homicides.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

Analysis (19)

Analysis (19) (19 of 19 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200511113152
    Description:

    After a period of decline from the late 1980s to mid-1990s, the youth employment rate (aged 15 to 24) rebounded between 1997 and 2004. Most of the jobs were in industries that traditionally hire large numbers of young people, including food services. The article documents the growth in youth employment by age, sex, industry and province.

    Release date: 2005-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038966
    Description:

    Studies of the postsecondary attainment of young adults are informative, but it is also useful to examine the educational aspirations of teenagers. Such studies profile the value placed on different types of formal education by youth as well as perceived opportunities for upward occupational mobility. This article explores the educational aspirations of 15-year-old visible minority immigrant students and compares them with those of Canadian-born youth who are not part of a visible minority group. It then identifies the most important factors that explain the large ethnocultural differences in university aspirations.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005270
    Description:

    This paper adopts the decomposition technique of DiNardo, Fortin and Lemieux (DFL, 1996) to decompose provincial differences in the distribution of Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) test scores and assesses the relative contribution of provincial differences in the distribution of "class size" and time-in-term, other school factors and student background factors. Class size and time-in-term are both important school choice variables and we examine how provincial achievement differences would change if the Alberta distribution of class size and time-in-term prevailed in the other provinces. Results differ by province, and for provinces where mean achievement gaps would be lower, not all students would benefit.

    Release date: 2005-11-22

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050068650
    Description:

    This annual report is an examination of homicide in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the characteristics of homicide incidents (murder, manslaughter and infanticide), victims and accused within the context of both short and long-term trends. Geographical patterns of homicide are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. Other key themes include international comparisons of homicide, gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, youth homicide and family (including spousal) homicides. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of homicide in Canada.

    Release date: 2005-10-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028454
    Description:

    Using longitudinal data from Statistics Canada's National Population Health Survey (NPHS), this article assesses the health impact of the immigration process, as individuals adjust to life in Canada, by comparing changes in immigrants' self-perceived health status, health care use, and health-related behaviours with those of the Canadian-born population. Information was collected from the same individuals over an eight-year period from 1994-1995 to 2002-2003.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005261
    Description:

    The upbringing of children is modeled as a modified principal agent problem in which children attempt to maximize their own well-being when faced with a parenting strategy chosen by the parent, to maximize parent's perception of family well-being. Thus, children as well as parents are players, but children have higher discount rates than parents. The simultaneity of parenting and child behaviour is confirmed using the 1994 Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children.

    Release date: 2005-08-02

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050058076
    Description:

    The annual report on crime statistics presents an analysis of the police-reported data in 2004. These data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. Data are examined at the national, provincial and territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas by type of crime. The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, other Criminal Code offences, impaired driving, drug offences and youth crime.

    Release date: 2005-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-620-M20050018061
    Description:

    This article looks at the increase in measured obesity rates among children and youth over the past 25 years. Analysis includes changes by age and sex. Comparisons are made to recent data collected in the United States as well as between provinces and various social and economic characteristics.

    Release date: 2005-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050047948
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. The annual Juristat, Youth Court Statistics, 2003-2004, summarizes trends from provincial/territorial youth courts across Canada, which provide data to the Youth Court Survey (YCS). In this Juristat, information is presented on the characteristics of cases and accused youth, conviction rates, sentencing and related issues. As well, statistics are presented for the thirteen year period from 1991-1992, the first year for which national data are available for the YCS, to the current year, 2003-2004.

    Release date: 2005-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050037946
    Description:

    This Juristat presents a profile of all shelters in Canada that provided residential services to abused women and their children in 2003-2004. Additionally, through the use of a snapshot day survey (April 14, 2004), selected characteristics of residents (i.e., reasons for coming to the shelter, age group, parenting responsibilities, relationship to abuser, involvement of the criminal justice system, etc.) are presented. Data for this Juristat come primarily from the Transition Home Survey (THS), a biennial census of all residential facilities for female victims of domestic violence conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics as part of the federal government's Family Violence Initiative. Questionnaires are mailed to all shelters known to provide residential services to abused women in every province and territory. Information is collected on the characteristics of the facilities and the services provided during the previous 12 months (April 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004). Cross-sectional comparisons and comparisons using time-series data from the THS Trend File are also included. The THS Trend File contains only those facilities that participated in the survey in each of the following years: 1997/98, 1999/00, 2001/02 and 2003/04.

    Release date: 2005-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017033
    Description:

    Delayed marriage, postponement of children, and adults with increasingly long-lived parents have given rise to the 'sandwich generation'. These are individuals caught between the often conflicting demands of caring for children and caring for seniors. Although still relatively small (712,000 in 2002), the ranks of the sandwich generation are likely to grow.

    Release date: 2005-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040037838
    Description:

    The prevalence of and factors associated with having sexual intercourse without a condom and ever being diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease (STD) are examined for youth aged 15 to 24.

    Release date: 2005-05-03

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040037837
    Description:

    What can we say about teenagers who had sexual intercourse at the age of 15 or less? This study estimates the percentage of adolescents who have had sexual intercourse by age 14 or 15. The study also examines demographic, socio-economic characteristics and other factors at age 12 or 13 that are associated with early sexual activity.

    Release date: 2005-05-03

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040037840
    Description:

    This article reports trends over the past decade in rates of smoking, initiation, quitting and relapse among youth. The prevalence of youth smoking is examined in relation to various factors, including parental smoking and smoke-free homes.

    Release date: 2005-05-03

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040037841
    Description:

    The present study examines food insecurity prevalence according to age, sex and province of residence for Canadians aged 12 and over. The characteristics of people most likely to live in a household where there is not enough money to eat, such as education level, income and family type are also presented.

    Release date: 2005-05-03

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050018064
    Description:

    This issue of Juristat presents statistical information on the extent and nature of violent victimization of children and youth in Canada in 2003 as reported to a subset of police services. Rates of victimization are presented for each age and sex. Data describes the different types of assaults perpetrated against children and youth, the weapons used to inflict injury, the injuries sustained and the location and time of the assault relative to various age groups. Other topics included in the report are child pornography, sexual exploitation of children, kidnapping and abduction of children. Data used in this report include police statistics from the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the Homicide Survey and court data from the Adult Criminal Court Survey.

    Release date: 2005-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005247
    Description:

    This study undertakes three comparisons using Cycle 2 (1996-97) data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) in Canada. First, the study compares the health outcomes of children of the Native-born Canadian (NBC) group with those of the immigrant group in general. Differences are also investigated within the three immigrant sub-groups: the American immigrant group, the European immigrant group and Asian immigrant group. Second, this study tests the hypothesis that the children of any immigrant group in Canada would have a higher level of health outcomes for the same level of resources. Third, the study examines the association of time of residency of immigrants in different groups and the health outcomes of their children. An immigrant family is defined as one in which at least one of the parents is foreign-born. Health outcomes are measured by the PMK's (person most knowledgeable about the child) assessment of the child's health. Ordered logit models are employed for estimation. The children selected for analysis are 4 to 13 years of age.

    The NLSCY data suggest that the health outcomes of children in the immigrant families in general are similar to that in the NBC group. However, the health outcomes of the Asian immigrant group are slightly lower and those of the American immigrant group are markedly better. Except for the American immigrant group, there is evidence that the children of any other immigrant group would have lower health status for the same level of resources. Decomposition results indicate that a higher level of observable and unobservable resources is responsible for markedly better outcomes for the American immigrant group; while a lower level of observable and unobservable resources is responsible for the lower level of outcomes for the Asian immigrant group. On the other hand, health outcomes are higher for the European immigrant group than for the NBC group when variation in resources is considered, while lower when variation in productivity coefficients is examined. Finally, there is statistical evidence that the health status of children of immigrant families would improve with the time of residency of immigrant parents, if it were lower initially. The findings of the study indicate that present health outcomes of children in the immigrant families, on average, are not a great concern. However, those of the Asian immigrant group may be a concern.

    Release date: 2005-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040027787
    Description:

    The proportion of mothers who attempt to breastfeed their babies rose from about 25% in the mid-1960s to 85% in 2003. However, just 17% of mothers breastfed exclusively for at least six months, as recommended by the Public Health Agency of Canada.Subjects

    Release date: 2005-03-15

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2005002
    Description:

    This study examines links between changes in relationships with parents and peers during adolescence and adolescent depressive symptoms. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, this study provides insight into: the relationships between youth and their mothers, fathers and friends; how these relationships changed over a two-year period; and how these changes related to depressive symptoms experienced by youth at ages 16 and 17.

    Release date: 2005-02-16

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

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