Statistics by subject – Children and youth

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type of information

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type of information

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type of information

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type of information

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (19)

All (19) (19 of 19 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2011022
    Description:

    This study explores the spatial distribution of police-reported youth crime in Toronto. It examines how youth crime is geographically distributed in Toronto and endeavours to shed light on the links between police-reported youth crime and the neighbourhood characteristics that are most strongly associated with it. This report represents the second phase of the spatial analysis of police-reported crime data for Toronto which builds on the research paper, Neighbourhood Characteristics and the Distribution of Police-reported Crime in the City of Toronto.

    Release date: 2011-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100411595
    Description:

    This article summarizes the key findings of a recent research report that examined the characteristics of young people who are most likely to go on to college or university following high school graduation and the factors that play a role in that decision. The focus of that research is on: youth from lower-income families; those from families with no parental history of attending postsecondary education; those living in rural areas; first- and second-generation children of immigrants; those from single parent (or other non-traditional) families; and Aboriginal youth.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100411594
    Description:

    A typical and direct path to postsecondary education involves high school graduates completing high school in May or June of any given year and then entering postsecondary education in September, resulting in a typical gap of about three months or less. However, not all young people follow this direct path, choosing instead to delay the start of postsecondary studies. This article summarizes the main findings of a recent research report that measured median delay times between high school graduation and starting a first postsecondary program and identified the factors associated with either speeding up or slowing down this transition.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201101211611
    Description:

    This paper reviews trends in the labour force participation rate from 1997 to the third quarter of 2011 and explores possible explanations as to why the participation rate was no longer increasing even before the onset of the 2008-2009 recession.

    Release date: 2011-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011336
    Description:

    This paper examines the education outcomes (including the chances of being a high school drop-out) of a cohort of immigrants who arrived in Canada as children using the 2006 Census. The research documents the degree to which high school graduation for immigrant children may change discretely after a particular age at arrival in Canada.

    Release date: 2011-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201100811537
    Description:

    All five projection scenarios show the labour force growing by 2031, although the participation rate could fall. The labour force also could be composed of more immigrants and visible miniorities by 2031.

    Release date: 2011-08-17

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111523
    Description:

    This report presents information on the short and long-term trends in police-reported crime at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. It includes information on both the volume and the severity of overall, violent and non-violent crime as well as data on crimes committed by youths aged 12 to 17.

    Release date: 2011-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-624-X201100111506
    Description:

    This article is an overview of injuries featuring results from the 2009-2010 Canadian Community Health Survey. With a focus on broad age groups, it explores various aspects of this topic such as who gets injured, main causes, and types of injuries.

    Release date: 2011-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100211490
    Description:

    Previous analysis based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) has shown that reading proficiency, as measured in the Programme for the International Student Assessment (PISA) at age 15, is strongly associated with both high school graduation and postsecondary participation. This article uses the most recent data from YITS, collected when youth were age 25, to examine educational, labour market, income and family formation outcomes associated with reading proficiency levels on PISA at age 15. The intent of the analysis is to identify any life-path differences that were associated with reading proficiency levels at age 15. The analysis is descriptive and exploratory in nature. Further analysis is needed to identify causal relationships in the data.

    Release date: 2011-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-599-X2011007
    Description:

    This fact sheet offers brief outlines of spending on postsecondary education, based on data from three Statistics Canada data sources: the Survey of Household Spending (SHS); the Tuition and Living Accommodation Costs for Full-time Students at Canadian Degree-granting Institutions (TLAC) survey; and the Financial Information of Universities and Colleges (FIUC) survey. Information on household spending on postsecondary tuition, on university tuition fees paid by students, and on student fees as a proportion of university revenues is presented for Canada and the provinces.

    Release date: 2011-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-625-X201100111468
    Description:

    This is a health fact sheet about smoking among Canadians. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2011-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011090
    Description:

    Not all high school graduates who attend a post-secondary institution go immediately after completing their diploma. An ever-increasing number of Canadian youth choose to remain out of the education system for a period of time prior to re-entering. A great deal of what we know about a gap year comes from other countries, particularly the United Kingdom. Who delays and for how long are, however, two questions that remain to be answered in the Canadian context. The current paper uses all five cycles of the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) to address the scant attention paid in the Canadian literature to the delay of the start of a post-secondary degree or diploma. Kaplan Meier results show that the median length of time between high school graduation and start of the first post-secondary (PSE) program is 4 months; however, this appears to be substantially longer for males, First Nations youth, Anglophones, youth from Ontario and youth whose parents have low levels of educational attainment. Equally influential were characteristics during the high school years. For example, youth with low marks, who worked many hours in paid employment while in high school, who skipped classes regularly, who took part in a lot of extracurricular activities not organized by the school, and whose close friends said they were not planning on going to PSE had median gap times between high school graduation and the start of postsecondary studies that were much longer than the average. Cox Proportional Hazard models confirm the robustness of several of the descriptive findings, including the effects of gender, province of high school, parental education, working during high school, marks, extracurricular activities, and the education plans of close friends.

    Release date: 2011-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111440
    Description:

    This article presents information on the short and long-term trends in the use of remand at the national and provincial/territorial levels for adults and youth. Remand is the temporary detention of a person while awaiting trial, sentencing or the commencement of a custodial disposition. The analysis looks at the number of adults and youth on remand, the number of admissions of adults and youth to remand and the length of time spent on remand. The characteristics of those on remand, including age, gender and Aboriginal identity, are also analysed.

    Release date: 2011-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011331
    Description:

    This paper reviews recent research on the determinants of the labour market outcomes of the children of immigrants in Canada and in the U.S. New research on outcomes in Canada is also presented. In the aggregate, and with no controls, the labour market outcomes of the second generation-the children of immigrants-are equal to, or better than, those of the third-and-higher generations-the children of domestic-born parents. However, the story is somewhat different after one has accounted for the superior educational levels and the residential locations of the second generation. In the U.S, the second generation's advantage in labour market outcomes disappears; in Canada, among second-generation members of a visible-minority group, the advantage turns marginally negative. Ethnic group/source region differences in outcomes loom large in both countries. The important determinants of the earnings gap between the second generation and the third-and-higher generations include educational attainment, which accounts for about half of the wage gap, residential location, ethnic background, the degree of "ethnic capital," and the educational and earnings mobility between immigrants and their children.

    Release date: 2011-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011332
    Description:

    This paper reviews the recent research on the determinants of the educational attainment among the children of immigrants born in Canada and the United States, also known as the second generation. The focus is on the gap in educational attainment between the second and third-and-higher generations (the children of domestic-born parents), as well as the intergenerational transmission of education between immigrants and their children.

    On average, the children of immigrants have educational levels significantly above those of their counterparts in Canada with Canadian-born parents. In the U.S., educational levels are roughly the same between these two groups. In both countries, conditional on the educational attainment of the parents and location of residence, the children of immigrants attain higher levels of education than the third-and-higher generations. Parental education and residential location are major determinants of the numerically positive gap in educational attainment between the children of immigrants and the children of Canadian-born or American-born parents. However, even after accounting for these and other demographic background variables, much of the positive gap between the second generation and the third-and-higher generations remains in Canada.

    In Canada, parental education is less important as a determinant of educational attainment for the children in immigrant families than for those with Canadian-born parents. Less educated immigrant parents are more likely to see their children attain higher levels of education than are their Canadian-born counterparts.

    Outcomes vary significantly by ethnic/source region group in both countries. In the U.S., some second-generation ethnic/source region groups, such as those with Mexican, Puerto Rican and other Central/South American backgrounds, have relatively low levels of education (unadjusted data with no controls). However, conditional on background characteristics, these second-generation groups achieve higher levels than their third-and-higher-generation counterparts. In contrast, in Canada, children of the larger and increasingly numerically important immigrant groups (Chinese, South Asians, Africans, etc.) register superior educational attainment levels to those of the third-and-higher generations. This result is partly related to the high levels of parental education and of group-level 'ethnic capital' among these immigrant groups.

    Release date: 2011-02-15

  • Table: 85-224-X
    Description:

    This is the thirteenth annual Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile report produced by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics under the Federal Family Violence Initiative. This annual report provides the most current data on the nature and extent of family violence in Canada, as well as trends over time, as part of the ongoing initiative to inform policy makers and the public about family violence issues. Each year the report has a different focus. This year, the focus of the report is on self-reported incidents of spousal victimization from the 2009 General Social Survey on Victimization. In addition, using police-reported data, the report also presents information on family violence against children and youth, family violence against seniors, and family-related homicides. The Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile will now be produced as an article in Juristat, catalogue no. 85-002-X , as such the old product number (85-224-X) associated with the report is now terminated.

    Release date: 2011-01-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011330
    Description:

    Current knowledge about the favourable socioeconomic attainment (in education and earnings) among children of immigrants is based on the experiences of those individuals whose immigrant parents came to Canada before the 1970s. Since then, successive cohorts of adult immigrants have experienced deteriorating entry earnings. This has raised questions about whether the outcomes of their children have changed over time. This study shows that successive cohorts of childhood immigrants who arrived in Canada at age 12 or younger during the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s had increasingly higher educational attainment (as measured by the share with university degrees) than their Canadian-born peers by age 25 to 34. Conditional on education and other background characteristics, male childhood immigrants who arrived in the 1960s earned less than the Canadian-born comparison group, but the two subsequent cohorts had similar earnings as the comparison group. Female childhood immigrants earned as much as the Canadian-born comparison group, except for the 1980s cohort, which earned more.

    Release date: 2011-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100111397
    Description:

    This article describes levels of accelerometer-measured activity in Canadian children and youth by age, sex and body weight status.

    Release date: 2011-01-19

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

  • Table: 85-224-X
    Description:

    This is the thirteenth annual Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile report produced by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics under the Federal Family Violence Initiative. This annual report provides the most current data on the nature and extent of family violence in Canada, as well as trends over time, as part of the ongoing initiative to inform policy makers and the public about family violence issues. Each year the report has a different focus. This year, the focus of the report is on self-reported incidents of spousal victimization from the 2009 General Social Survey on Victimization. In addition, using police-reported data, the report also presents information on family violence against children and youth, family violence against seniors, and family-related homicides. The Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile will now be produced as an article in Juristat, catalogue no. 85-002-X , as such the old product number (85-224-X) associated with the report is now terminated.

    Release date: 2011-01-27

Analysis (17)

Analysis (17) (17 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2011022
    Description:

    This study explores the spatial distribution of police-reported youth crime in Toronto. It examines how youth crime is geographically distributed in Toronto and endeavours to shed light on the links between police-reported youth crime and the neighbourhood characteristics that are most strongly associated with it. This report represents the second phase of the spatial analysis of police-reported crime data for Toronto which builds on the research paper, Neighbourhood Characteristics and the Distribution of Police-reported Crime in the City of Toronto.

    Release date: 2011-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100411595
    Description:

    This article summarizes the key findings of a recent research report that examined the characteristics of young people who are most likely to go on to college or university following high school graduation and the factors that play a role in that decision. The focus of that research is on: youth from lower-income families; those from families with no parental history of attending postsecondary education; those living in rural areas; first- and second-generation children of immigrants; those from single parent (or other non-traditional) families; and Aboriginal youth.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100411594
    Description:

    A typical and direct path to postsecondary education involves high school graduates completing high school in May or June of any given year and then entering postsecondary education in September, resulting in a typical gap of about three months or less. However, not all young people follow this direct path, choosing instead to delay the start of postsecondary studies. This article summarizes the main findings of a recent research report that measured median delay times between high school graduation and starting a first postsecondary program and identified the factors associated with either speeding up or slowing down this transition.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201101211611
    Description:

    This paper reviews trends in the labour force participation rate from 1997 to the third quarter of 2011 and explores possible explanations as to why the participation rate was no longer increasing even before the onset of the 2008-2009 recession.

    Release date: 2011-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011336
    Description:

    This paper examines the education outcomes (including the chances of being a high school drop-out) of a cohort of immigrants who arrived in Canada as children using the 2006 Census. The research documents the degree to which high school graduation for immigrant children may change discretely after a particular age at arrival in Canada.

    Release date: 2011-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201100811537
    Description:

    All five projection scenarios show the labour force growing by 2031, although the participation rate could fall. The labour force also could be composed of more immigrants and visible miniorities by 2031.

    Release date: 2011-08-17

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111523
    Description:

    This report presents information on the short and long-term trends in police-reported crime at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. It includes information on both the volume and the severity of overall, violent and non-violent crime as well as data on crimes committed by youths aged 12 to 17.

    Release date: 2011-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-624-X201100111506
    Description:

    This article is an overview of injuries featuring results from the 2009-2010 Canadian Community Health Survey. With a focus on broad age groups, it explores various aspects of this topic such as who gets injured, main causes, and types of injuries.

    Release date: 2011-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100211490
    Description:

    Previous analysis based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) has shown that reading proficiency, as measured in the Programme for the International Student Assessment (PISA) at age 15, is strongly associated with both high school graduation and postsecondary participation. This article uses the most recent data from YITS, collected when youth were age 25, to examine educational, labour market, income and family formation outcomes associated with reading proficiency levels on PISA at age 15. The intent of the analysis is to identify any life-path differences that were associated with reading proficiency levels at age 15. The analysis is descriptive and exploratory in nature. Further analysis is needed to identify causal relationships in the data.

    Release date: 2011-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-599-X2011007
    Description:

    This fact sheet offers brief outlines of spending on postsecondary education, based on data from three Statistics Canada data sources: the Survey of Household Spending (SHS); the Tuition and Living Accommodation Costs for Full-time Students at Canadian Degree-granting Institutions (TLAC) survey; and the Financial Information of Universities and Colleges (FIUC) survey. Information on household spending on postsecondary tuition, on university tuition fees paid by students, and on student fees as a proportion of university revenues is presented for Canada and the provinces.

    Release date: 2011-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-625-X201100111468
    Description:

    This is a health fact sheet about smoking among Canadians. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2011-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011090
    Description:

    Not all high school graduates who attend a post-secondary institution go immediately after completing their diploma. An ever-increasing number of Canadian youth choose to remain out of the education system for a period of time prior to re-entering. A great deal of what we know about a gap year comes from other countries, particularly the United Kingdom. Who delays and for how long are, however, two questions that remain to be answered in the Canadian context. The current paper uses all five cycles of the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) to address the scant attention paid in the Canadian literature to the delay of the start of a post-secondary degree or diploma. Kaplan Meier results show that the median length of time between high school graduation and start of the first post-secondary (PSE) program is 4 months; however, this appears to be substantially longer for males, First Nations youth, Anglophones, youth from Ontario and youth whose parents have low levels of educational attainment. Equally influential were characteristics during the high school years. For example, youth with low marks, who worked many hours in paid employment while in high school, who skipped classes regularly, who took part in a lot of extracurricular activities not organized by the school, and whose close friends said they were not planning on going to PSE had median gap times between high school graduation and the start of postsecondary studies that were much longer than the average. Cox Proportional Hazard models confirm the robustness of several of the descriptive findings, including the effects of gender, province of high school, parental education, working during high school, marks, extracurricular activities, and the education plans of close friends.

    Release date: 2011-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111440
    Description:

    This article presents information on the short and long-term trends in the use of remand at the national and provincial/territorial levels for adults and youth. Remand is the temporary detention of a person while awaiting trial, sentencing or the commencement of a custodial disposition. The analysis looks at the number of adults and youth on remand, the number of admissions of adults and youth to remand and the length of time spent on remand. The characteristics of those on remand, including age, gender and Aboriginal identity, are also analysed.

    Release date: 2011-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011331
    Description:

    This paper reviews recent research on the determinants of the labour market outcomes of the children of immigrants in Canada and in the U.S. New research on outcomes in Canada is also presented. In the aggregate, and with no controls, the labour market outcomes of the second generation-the children of immigrants-are equal to, or better than, those of the third-and-higher generations-the children of domestic-born parents. However, the story is somewhat different after one has accounted for the superior educational levels and the residential locations of the second generation. In the U.S, the second generation's advantage in labour market outcomes disappears; in Canada, among second-generation members of a visible-minority group, the advantage turns marginally negative. Ethnic group/source region differences in outcomes loom large in both countries. The important determinants of the earnings gap between the second generation and the third-and-higher generations include educational attainment, which accounts for about half of the wage gap, residential location, ethnic background, the degree of "ethnic capital," and the educational and earnings mobility between immigrants and their children.

    Release date: 2011-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011332
    Description:

    This paper reviews the recent research on the determinants of the educational attainment among the children of immigrants born in Canada and the United States, also known as the second generation. The focus is on the gap in educational attainment between the second and third-and-higher generations (the children of domestic-born parents), as well as the intergenerational transmission of education between immigrants and their children.

    On average, the children of immigrants have educational levels significantly above those of their counterparts in Canada with Canadian-born parents. In the U.S., educational levels are roughly the same between these two groups. In both countries, conditional on the educational attainment of the parents and location of residence, the children of immigrants attain higher levels of education than the third-and-higher generations. Parental education and residential location are major determinants of the numerically positive gap in educational attainment between the children of immigrants and the children of Canadian-born or American-born parents. However, even after accounting for these and other demographic background variables, much of the positive gap between the second generation and the third-and-higher generations remains in Canada.

    In Canada, parental education is less important as a determinant of educational attainment for the children in immigrant families than for those with Canadian-born parents. Less educated immigrant parents are more likely to see their children attain higher levels of education than are their Canadian-born counterparts.

    Outcomes vary significantly by ethnic/source region group in both countries. In the U.S., some second-generation ethnic/source region groups, such as those with Mexican, Puerto Rican and other Central/South American backgrounds, have relatively low levels of education (unadjusted data with no controls). However, conditional on background characteristics, these second-generation groups achieve higher levels than their third-and-higher-generation counterparts. In contrast, in Canada, children of the larger and increasingly numerically important immigrant groups (Chinese, South Asians, Africans, etc.) register superior educational attainment levels to those of the third-and-higher generations. This result is partly related to the high levels of parental education and of group-level 'ethnic capital' among these immigrant groups.

    Release date: 2011-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011330
    Description:

    Current knowledge about the favourable socioeconomic attainment (in education and earnings) among children of immigrants is based on the experiences of those individuals whose immigrant parents came to Canada before the 1970s. Since then, successive cohorts of adult immigrants have experienced deteriorating entry earnings. This has raised questions about whether the outcomes of their children have changed over time. This study shows that successive cohorts of childhood immigrants who arrived in Canada at age 12 or younger during the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s had increasingly higher educational attainment (as measured by the share with university degrees) than their Canadian-born peers by age 25 to 34. Conditional on education and other background characteristics, male childhood immigrants who arrived in the 1960s earned less than the Canadian-born comparison group, but the two subsequent cohorts had similar earnings as the comparison group. Female childhood immigrants earned as much as the Canadian-born comparison group, except for the 1980s cohort, which earned more.

    Release date: 2011-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100111397
    Description:

    This article describes levels of accelerometer-measured activity in Canadian children and youth by age, sex and body weight status.

    Release date: 2011-01-19

Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

Your search for "" found no results in this section of the site.

You may try:

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: