Statistics by subject – Children and youth

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Survey or statistical program

38 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Survey or statistical program

38 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Survey or statistical program

38 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Survey or statistical program

38 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (13)

All (13) (13 of 13 results)

  • Table: 81-582-X
    Description:

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) draws from a wide variety of data sources to provide information on the school-age population, elementary, secondary and postsecondary education, transitions, and labour market outcomes.

    PCEIP products include tables, fact sheets, reports and a methodological handbook. They present indicators for all of Canada, the provinces, the territories, as well as selected international comparisons and comparisons over time.

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) is an ongoing initiative of the Canadian Education Statistics Council, a partnership between Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada that provides a set of statistical measures on education systems in Canada.

    Release date: 2017-09-19

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-599-X
    Description:

    The fact sheets in this series provide an "at-a-glance" overview of particular aspects of education in Canada and summarize key data trends in selected tables published as part of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP).

    The PCEIP mission is to publish a set of statistical measures on education systems in Canada for policy makers, practitioners and the general public to monitor the performance of education systems across jurisdictions and over time. PCEIP is a joint venture of Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (CMEC).

    Release date: 2016-10-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-599-M
    Description:

    This research paper series addresses many topics related to children and youth in Canada, including: cognitive, physical and emotional development; health; behaviour; relationships with others; experiences in the home, at school and at work; family change; and transitions to adulthood. The main data source for the papers in this series is the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth.

    Release date: 2009-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2009006
    Description:

    This study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to provide a picture of Canadian 9-year-old children at the transition between the primary grades and the junior grades in school. The children varied widely in their academic achievement, and some of these variations were linked to their gender, their family income level, and their province of residence. Marked differences were also found in the education environments of children, linked most consistently to family income levels. These education environments were not linked to academic success as measured by mathematics achievement at school. Academic achievement at age 9 was significantly related to school readiness four years earlier.

    Release date: 2009-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2008005
    Description:

    This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to examine the relationship between late childbearing (at or after age 35) among first-time mothers in Canada and three facets of development: physical health, behaviour and cognitive development. The following research questions were addressed: do the developmental characteristics of children born to older mothers differ from those of children born to younger mothers? And do other factors, such as demographic characteristics and parenting practices, account for differences in child development by maternal age at birth? For this analysis, first-born children were identified from among all interviewed children whose year of birth was between 1998 and 2005.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2006004
    Description:

    This report provides an overview of Canadian children as they enter school as 5-year-olds. It looks at the collection of abilities, behaviours and attitudes that they bring with them, attributes that are important for early school achievement. The report shows that children vary on some dimensions of readiness to learn at school, according to their family characteristics, their background and their home environment and experiences. It also shows that some of the differences in readiness to learn may already be evident two years earlier, when the children were 3 years old. Finally, the report indicates factors in the home environment that may contribute to differences among different economic groups. The report adds to what we know about readiness to learn. It provides information that may be useful for policy analysts, teachers, researchers, and parents themselves as they work toward maximizing the potential of preschool children everywhere.

    Release date: 2006-11-27

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2006003
    Description:

    This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to profile child care in Canada by focussing on the child care experiences of children aged 6 months to 5 years. The report covers the eight-year period from 1994/95 to 2002/03. Many aspects of child care are discussed including types of care arrangements, hours spent in care, characteristics of and changes in care arrangements, and the use of multiple arrangements. These aspects are compared over time, as are the child care experiences of children from various backgrounds. In addition, patterns in types of care arrangements as children age are discussed.

    Release date: 2006-04-05

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-594-X
    Description:

    This paper uses three cycles of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to examine whether parental labour market participation and the use of substitute child-care influence the development of the skills needed by pre-school-aged children in order to begin school. The analysis in this paper is based on the arguments that parent-child interaction fosters the development of the skills needed by pre-school-aged children in order to begin school successfully, and that full-time participation in the work force by lone parents (in one-parent families) and by both parents (in dual-parent families) often results in comparatively less time for parent-child interaction than in families with a stay-at-home parent. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine whether reductions in parental time spent with children as a result of work outside the home impact the intellectual development of young children.

    The study indicates that parental participation in the labour market has little effect on the school readiness scores of most pre-school-aged children. However, children's school readiness does appear to be influenced by parental labour market participation if the parents exhibit above-average parenting skills and levels of parental education. Children of mothers who display above-average parenting skills and higher levels of education tend to benefit slightly when their mothers do not work outside the home. Likewise, children of fathers with above-average education exhibit slightly higher cognitive outcomes if their fathers work part time.

    Although the author finds that there is no association between the number of hours that children spend in child care and their level of school readiness, the study does observe that among pre-school children in substitute child-care, those who come from higher-income families tend to score higher on the school readiness tests than do children from lower-income families. This finding may be attributed to the possibility that children in higher-income families are exposed to a higher quality of substitute child-care, or it may be attributed simply to the advantages of growing up in a family with greater resources.

    Release date: 2003-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2003002
    Description:

    This research paper explores the effect of witnessing violence in the home on aggressive behaviour among children, controlling for other important influences such as parenting practices, community and social support available to the parent and child, child emotional problems, and other socio-demographic factors.

    Release date: 2003-06-19

  • Public use microdata: 89M0015X
    Description:

    The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY), developed jointly by Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada, is a comprehensive survey which follows the development of children in Canada and paints a picture of their lives. The survey monitors children's development and measures the incidence of various factors that influence their development, both positively and negatively.

    Release date: 2001-05-30

  • Classification: 89F0077X199903A
    Description:

    The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) is the first Canada-wide survey of children. Starting in 1994, it will gather information on a sample of children and their life experiences. It will follow these children over time. The survey will collect information on children and their families, education, health, development, behaviour, friends, activities, etc.

    Along with 89F0077XPE (or XIE) issue 9903b, this document contains the various questionnaires used to gather information from parents, children, teachers and principals.

    Release date: 1999-10-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 89F0117X
    Description:

    This report outlines some initial results from the School Component of the first and second cycles of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY). It examines the longitudinal influence of Early Childhood Care and Education and literacy activities on young children's future academic and cognitive outcomes. This overview highlights the information newly available from this component of the survey; it is not comprehensive in its coverage or its analysis. Indeed, the information collected by the NLSCY is so rich and detailed that researchers and analysts will be using it to address a variety of important questions concerning the education of children and youth in Canada for many years to come. Here then, we are merely scratching the surface to stimulate awareness of this rich new data source, and to illustrate the kinds of analyses it makes possible.

    Release date: 1999-10-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-566-X
    Description:

    This report, based on results from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY), focuses on changes in the family environment, specifically, common-law unions, custody arrangements and financial issues. The NLSCY is a comprehensive survey which will follow the development of children in Canada and paint a picture of their lives.

    Release date: 1998-08-11

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

  • Table: 81-582-X
    Description:

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) draws from a wide variety of data sources to provide information on the school-age population, elementary, secondary and postsecondary education, transitions, and labour market outcomes.

    PCEIP products include tables, fact sheets, reports and a methodological handbook. They present indicators for all of Canada, the provinces, the territories, as well as selected international comparisons and comparisons over time.

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) is an ongoing initiative of the Canadian Education Statistics Council, a partnership between Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada that provides a set of statistical measures on education systems in Canada.

    Release date: 2017-09-19

  • Public use microdata: 89M0015X
    Description:

    The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY), developed jointly by Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada, is a comprehensive survey which follows the development of children in Canada and paints a picture of their lives. The survey monitors children's development and measures the incidence of various factors that influence their development, both positively and negatively.

    Release date: 2001-05-30

Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) (10 of 10 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-599-X
    Description:

    The fact sheets in this series provide an "at-a-glance" overview of particular aspects of education in Canada and summarize key data trends in selected tables published as part of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP).

    The PCEIP mission is to publish a set of statistical measures on education systems in Canada for policy makers, practitioners and the general public to monitor the performance of education systems across jurisdictions and over time. PCEIP is a joint venture of Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (CMEC).

    Release date: 2016-10-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-599-M
    Description:

    This research paper series addresses many topics related to children and youth in Canada, including: cognitive, physical and emotional development; health; behaviour; relationships with others; experiences in the home, at school and at work; family change; and transitions to adulthood. The main data source for the papers in this series is the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth.

    Release date: 2009-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2009006
    Description:

    This study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to provide a picture of Canadian 9-year-old children at the transition between the primary grades and the junior grades in school. The children varied widely in their academic achievement, and some of these variations were linked to their gender, their family income level, and their province of residence. Marked differences were also found in the education environments of children, linked most consistently to family income levels. These education environments were not linked to academic success as measured by mathematics achievement at school. Academic achievement at age 9 was significantly related to school readiness four years earlier.

    Release date: 2009-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2008005
    Description:

    This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to examine the relationship between late childbearing (at or after age 35) among first-time mothers in Canada and three facets of development: physical health, behaviour and cognitive development. The following research questions were addressed: do the developmental characteristics of children born to older mothers differ from those of children born to younger mothers? And do other factors, such as demographic characteristics and parenting practices, account for differences in child development by maternal age at birth? For this analysis, first-born children were identified from among all interviewed children whose year of birth was between 1998 and 2005.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2006004
    Description:

    This report provides an overview of Canadian children as they enter school as 5-year-olds. It looks at the collection of abilities, behaviours and attitudes that they bring with them, attributes that are important for early school achievement. The report shows that children vary on some dimensions of readiness to learn at school, according to their family characteristics, their background and their home environment and experiences. It also shows that some of the differences in readiness to learn may already be evident two years earlier, when the children were 3 years old. Finally, the report indicates factors in the home environment that may contribute to differences among different economic groups. The report adds to what we know about readiness to learn. It provides information that may be useful for policy analysts, teachers, researchers, and parents themselves as they work toward maximizing the potential of preschool children everywhere.

    Release date: 2006-11-27

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2006003
    Description:

    This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to profile child care in Canada by focussing on the child care experiences of children aged 6 months to 5 years. The report covers the eight-year period from 1994/95 to 2002/03. Many aspects of child care are discussed including types of care arrangements, hours spent in care, characteristics of and changes in care arrangements, and the use of multiple arrangements. These aspects are compared over time, as are the child care experiences of children from various backgrounds. In addition, patterns in types of care arrangements as children age are discussed.

    Release date: 2006-04-05

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-594-X
    Description:

    This paper uses three cycles of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to examine whether parental labour market participation and the use of substitute child-care influence the development of the skills needed by pre-school-aged children in order to begin school. The analysis in this paper is based on the arguments that parent-child interaction fosters the development of the skills needed by pre-school-aged children in order to begin school successfully, and that full-time participation in the work force by lone parents (in one-parent families) and by both parents (in dual-parent families) often results in comparatively less time for parent-child interaction than in families with a stay-at-home parent. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine whether reductions in parental time spent with children as a result of work outside the home impact the intellectual development of young children.

    The study indicates that parental participation in the labour market has little effect on the school readiness scores of most pre-school-aged children. However, children's school readiness does appear to be influenced by parental labour market participation if the parents exhibit above-average parenting skills and levels of parental education. Children of mothers who display above-average parenting skills and higher levels of education tend to benefit slightly when their mothers do not work outside the home. Likewise, children of fathers with above-average education exhibit slightly higher cognitive outcomes if their fathers work part time.

    Although the author finds that there is no association between the number of hours that children spend in child care and their level of school readiness, the study does observe that among pre-school children in substitute child-care, those who come from higher-income families tend to score higher on the school readiness tests than do children from lower-income families. This finding may be attributed to the possibility that children in higher-income families are exposed to a higher quality of substitute child-care, or it may be attributed simply to the advantages of growing up in a family with greater resources.

    Release date: 2003-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2003002
    Description:

    This research paper explores the effect of witnessing violence in the home on aggressive behaviour among children, controlling for other important influences such as parenting practices, community and social support available to the parent and child, child emotional problems, and other socio-demographic factors.

    Release date: 2003-06-19

  • Journals and periodicals: 89F0117X
    Description:

    This report outlines some initial results from the School Component of the first and second cycles of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY). It examines the longitudinal influence of Early Childhood Care and Education and literacy activities on young children's future academic and cognitive outcomes. This overview highlights the information newly available from this component of the survey; it is not comprehensive in its coverage or its analysis. Indeed, the information collected by the NLSCY is so rich and detailed that researchers and analysts will be using it to address a variety of important questions concerning the education of children and youth in Canada for many years to come. Here then, we are merely scratching the surface to stimulate awareness of this rich new data source, and to illustrate the kinds of analyses it makes possible.

    Release date: 1999-10-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-566-X
    Description:

    This report, based on results from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY), focuses on changes in the family environment, specifically, common-law unions, custody arrangements and financial issues. The NLSCY is a comprehensive survey which will follow the development of children in Canada and paint a picture of their lives.

    Release date: 1998-08-11

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Classification: 89F0077X199903A
    Description:

    The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) is the first Canada-wide survey of children. Starting in 1994, it will gather information on a sample of children and their life experiences. It will follow these children over time. The survey will collect information on children and their families, education, health, development, behaviour, friends, activities, etc.

    Along with 89F0077XPE (or XIE) issue 9903b, this document contains the various questionnaires used to gather information from parents, children, teachers and principals.

    Release date: 1999-10-22

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: