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All (14)

All (14) (14 of 14 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-06-06

  • Table: 85-003-X
    Description:

    This free publication is based on data from the Victim Services Survey and provides national and provincial/territorial profiles of victim service agencies that responded to the survey, as well as information on the clients they served. The Victim Services Survey was conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics and was funded by Justice Canada's Policy Centre for Victim Issues. Victim service agencies surveyed include system-based, police-based and court-based agencies, sexual assault centres, other selected community-based agencies, and criminal injuries compensation and other financial benefit programs for victims of crime. It should be noted that data on transition homes and shelters for abused women and their children are collected through Statistics Canada's Transition Home Survey.

    Release date: 2014-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2010020
    Description:

    This research paper focuses on police-reported crime in Inuit Nunangat. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2006 to 2008 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the 2006 Census of Population. Additional data come from the Homicide Survey from 2000 to 2008. Results show that crime rates are higher in Inuit Nunangat than in the rest of Canada. The impact of socioeconomic and demographic contexts on these differences is explored. In addition, results show that crime rates are lower in communities in Inuit Nunangat where alcohol is prohibited.

    Release date: 2010-05-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2009018
    Description:

    This research paper focuses on the spatial analysis of crime and neighbourhood characteristics in Toronto. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2006 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the 2006 Census of Population.

    Release date: 2009-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2009017
    Description:

    This study examined the influence of school, neighbourhood and student characteristics on the likelihood of students committing violent delinquency. Based on data from the International Youth Survey (2006), findings indicated that there was significant variation in violent delinquency across Toronto schools. In part, this variation was explained by the school climate, or the perceived atmosphere in the school. In particular, a higher level of school capital (positive feeling toward the school) reduced students' chances of committing violent behaviour over and above any of their own risk factors. In contrast, the findings did not support the contention that the level of crime and/or socioeconomic disadvantage in the neighbourhoods surrounding schools had an influence on students' violent behaviour.

    Release date: 2009-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008015
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the major trends in the series on the spatial analysis of crime conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (CCJS) using geographic information system technology in Canadian cities. The main purpose of this analytical series was to explore the relationships between the distribution of crime and the demographic, socio economic and functional characteristics of neighbourhoods. Questions addressed include: How are police reported criminal incidents distributed across city neighbourhoods? Is the crime rate in a neighbourhood associated with factors that are specific to that neighbourhood, such as its demographic, socio-economic, housing and land use characteristics? Is the crime rate in a neighbourhood influenced by nearby neighbourhoods? These questions were explored using data from the 2001 Census of Population, the Incident-Based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR2), and land use data provided by the various cities.

    Release date: 2008-10-07

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008013
    Description:

    The purpose of this research paper was to examine whether the chances of experiencing fear of crime varied across Canadian urban neighbourhoods, and whether factors associated with individuals and their neighbourhoods explained this variation. In addition, the study aimed to understand how Canadians' perceptions of neighbourhood crime and disorder influenced their chances of experiencing fear. Analyses were based on data from the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization and the 2001 Census. Multilevel regression modelling techniques were employed in order to address the statistical complications that arise when individuals are clustered within larger units such as neighbourhoods. The results showed that while the characteristics and perceptions of individuals were most important in explaining differences in fear among urban Canadians; a statistically significant portion of the variation in fear was attributable to the neighbourhood environment.

    Release date: 2008-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008012
    Description:

    This research paper focuses on the spatial analysis of crime and neighbourhood characteristics in Saskatoon. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2001 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the 2001 Census of Population.

    Release date: 2008-07-03

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008011
    Description:

    This research paper explores the spatial distribution of youth crime and various social, economic and physical neighbourhood characteristics on the Island of Montréal. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2001 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the 2001 Census of Population, and the Communauté métropolitaine de Montréal land-use data.

    Release date: 2008-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2008016
    Description:

    Until recently, there were no national data on the extent to which gays, lesbians and bisexuals were victims of violent crime and discrimination, nor was there any national information about their fear of crime or their perceptions of the criminal justice system.

    Using the GSS self-reported data, this new report provides a profile of the extent to which gays, lesbians and bisexuals were victims of violent crime and spousal violence. It also provides national information about their perception of discrimination, their fear of crime and their perception of the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2008-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2008015
    Description:

    Using data from the 2001 Census of Population and self-reported data from the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization, this profile examines certain socio-demographic and economic characteristics of visible minorities in Canada followed by an analysis of the rates and characteristics of violent crimes involving visible minority victims. It also provides information on visible minorities perceptions of safety, discrimination and of the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2008-02-13

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2006011
    Description:

    Using recent police-reported and self-reported data, this new report provides a profile of the extent and nature of victimization and offending in Canada's territories.

    The report finds that northern residents experience higher rates of violent victimization and are more likely to be victims of spousal violence than residents in the rest of Canada. Furthermore, police-reported crime rates in the North are much higher than those in the provinces.

    The report also examines particular factors that seem to be associated with higher rates of victimization and offending. All are more common in the North. These factors include: northern residents are younger on average, than residents in the rest of Canada; the territories have higher proportions of lone-parent families and common-law families; they have higher rates of unemployment; and the territories also have higher proportions of Aboriginal residents compared to the provinces.

    Release date: 2006-10-30

  • Technical products: 85-564-X
    Description:

    This objective of this report is to present the status of national data on Aboriginal people who come into contact with the criminal justice system as offenders and victims. The report examines the current and potential collection of an individual's Aboriginal identity through various justice-related surveys at Statistics Canada, the challenges within these surveys to collect these data and provides some insight into the quality of these data. The data and sources are examined within the context of information needs for the justice and social policy sectors, and in relation to the preferred method of measuring Aboriginal Identity at Statistics Canada. Data sources examined include the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the Homicide Survey, the Integrated Criminal Courts Survey, the Adult Corrections Survey, the Youth Custody and Community Services Survey, the Youth Alternative Measures Survey, the Transition Home Survey, the Victim Services Survey and the General Social Survey on Victimization. Finally, the report briefly describes efforts by other countries to improve justice-related information on their indigenous populations.

    Release date: 2005-05-10

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 85F0036X
    Description:

    This study documents the methodological and technical challenges that are involved in performing analysis on small groups using a sample survey, oversampling, response rate, non-response rate due to language, release feasibility and sampling variability. It is based on the 1999 General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization.

    Release date: 2002-05-14

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 85-003-X
    Description:

    This free publication is based on data from the Victim Services Survey and provides national and provincial/territorial profiles of victim service agencies that responded to the survey, as well as information on the clients they served. The Victim Services Survey was conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics and was funded by Justice Canada's Policy Centre for Victim Issues. Victim service agencies surveyed include system-based, police-based and court-based agencies, sexual assault centres, other selected community-based agencies, and criminal injuries compensation and other financial benefit programs for victims of crime. It should be noted that data on transition homes and shelters for abused women and their children are collected through Statistics Canada's Transition Home Survey.

    Release date: 2014-03-24

Analysis (11)

Analysis (11) (11 of 11 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-06-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2010020
    Description:

    This research paper focuses on police-reported crime in Inuit Nunangat. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2006 to 2008 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the 2006 Census of Population. Additional data come from the Homicide Survey from 2000 to 2008. Results show that crime rates are higher in Inuit Nunangat than in the rest of Canada. The impact of socioeconomic and demographic contexts on these differences is explored. In addition, results show that crime rates are lower in communities in Inuit Nunangat where alcohol is prohibited.

    Release date: 2010-05-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2009018
    Description:

    This research paper focuses on the spatial analysis of crime and neighbourhood characteristics in Toronto. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2006 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the 2006 Census of Population.

    Release date: 2009-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2009017
    Description:

    This study examined the influence of school, neighbourhood and student characteristics on the likelihood of students committing violent delinquency. Based on data from the International Youth Survey (2006), findings indicated that there was significant variation in violent delinquency across Toronto schools. In part, this variation was explained by the school climate, or the perceived atmosphere in the school. In particular, a higher level of school capital (positive feeling toward the school) reduced students' chances of committing violent behaviour over and above any of their own risk factors. In contrast, the findings did not support the contention that the level of crime and/or socioeconomic disadvantage in the neighbourhoods surrounding schools had an influence on students' violent behaviour.

    Release date: 2009-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008015
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the major trends in the series on the spatial analysis of crime conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (CCJS) using geographic information system technology in Canadian cities. The main purpose of this analytical series was to explore the relationships between the distribution of crime and the demographic, socio economic and functional characteristics of neighbourhoods. Questions addressed include: How are police reported criminal incidents distributed across city neighbourhoods? Is the crime rate in a neighbourhood associated with factors that are specific to that neighbourhood, such as its demographic, socio-economic, housing and land use characteristics? Is the crime rate in a neighbourhood influenced by nearby neighbourhoods? These questions were explored using data from the 2001 Census of Population, the Incident-Based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR2), and land use data provided by the various cities.

    Release date: 2008-10-07

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008013
    Description:

    The purpose of this research paper was to examine whether the chances of experiencing fear of crime varied across Canadian urban neighbourhoods, and whether factors associated with individuals and their neighbourhoods explained this variation. In addition, the study aimed to understand how Canadians' perceptions of neighbourhood crime and disorder influenced their chances of experiencing fear. Analyses were based on data from the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization and the 2001 Census. Multilevel regression modelling techniques were employed in order to address the statistical complications that arise when individuals are clustered within larger units such as neighbourhoods. The results showed that while the characteristics and perceptions of individuals were most important in explaining differences in fear among urban Canadians; a statistically significant portion of the variation in fear was attributable to the neighbourhood environment.

    Release date: 2008-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008012
    Description:

    This research paper focuses on the spatial analysis of crime and neighbourhood characteristics in Saskatoon. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2001 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the 2001 Census of Population.

    Release date: 2008-07-03

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008011
    Description:

    This research paper explores the spatial distribution of youth crime and various social, economic and physical neighbourhood characteristics on the Island of Montréal. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2001 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the 2001 Census of Population, and the Communauté métropolitaine de Montréal land-use data.

    Release date: 2008-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2008016
    Description:

    Until recently, there were no national data on the extent to which gays, lesbians and bisexuals were victims of violent crime and discrimination, nor was there any national information about their fear of crime or their perceptions of the criminal justice system.

    Using the GSS self-reported data, this new report provides a profile of the extent to which gays, lesbians and bisexuals were victims of violent crime and spousal violence. It also provides national information about their perception of discrimination, their fear of crime and their perception of the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2008-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2008015
    Description:

    Using data from the 2001 Census of Population and self-reported data from the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization, this profile examines certain socio-demographic and economic characteristics of visible minorities in Canada followed by an analysis of the rates and characteristics of violent crimes involving visible minority victims. It also provides information on visible minorities perceptions of safety, discrimination and of the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2008-02-13

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2006011
    Description:

    Using recent police-reported and self-reported data, this new report provides a profile of the extent and nature of victimization and offending in Canada's territories.

    The report finds that northern residents experience higher rates of violent victimization and are more likely to be victims of spousal violence than residents in the rest of Canada. Furthermore, police-reported crime rates in the North are much higher than those in the provinces.

    The report also examines particular factors that seem to be associated with higher rates of victimization and offending. All are more common in the North. These factors include: northern residents are younger on average, than residents in the rest of Canada; the territories have higher proportions of lone-parent families and common-law families; they have higher rates of unemployment; and the territories also have higher proportions of Aboriginal residents compared to the provinces.

    Release date: 2006-10-30

Reference (2)

Reference (2) (2 results)

  • Technical products: 85-564-X
    Description:

    This objective of this report is to present the status of national data on Aboriginal people who come into contact with the criminal justice system as offenders and victims. The report examines the current and potential collection of an individual's Aboriginal identity through various justice-related surveys at Statistics Canada, the challenges within these surveys to collect these data and provides some insight into the quality of these data. The data and sources are examined within the context of information needs for the justice and social policy sectors, and in relation to the preferred method of measuring Aboriginal Identity at Statistics Canada. Data sources examined include the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the Homicide Survey, the Integrated Criminal Courts Survey, the Adult Corrections Survey, the Youth Custody and Community Services Survey, the Youth Alternative Measures Survey, the Transition Home Survey, the Victim Services Survey and the General Social Survey on Victimization. Finally, the report briefly describes efforts by other countries to improve justice-related information on their indigenous populations.

    Release date: 2005-05-10

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 85F0036X
    Description:

    This study documents the methodological and technical challenges that are involved in performing analysis on small groups using a sample survey, oversampling, response rate, non-response rate due to language, release feasibility and sampling variability. It is based on the 1999 General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization.

    Release date: 2002-05-14

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