Statistics by subject – Adult education and training

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  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-06-27

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-03-29

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-09-19

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-07-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016380
    Description:

    Every year, thousands of workers lose their job in many industrialized countries (OECD 2013). Faced with job loss, displaced workers may choose to return to school to help them reintegrate into the labour force. Job losses in a given local labour market may also induce workers who have not yet been laid off to pre-emptively enrol in postsecondary (PS) institutions, as a precautionary measure. Combining microdata and grouped data, this study examines these two dimensions of the relationship between layoffs and PS enrolment over the 2001-to-2011 period.

    Release date: 2016-07-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2013100
    Description:

    Past research has revealed that young women are more likely to enter postsecondary programs that have lower returns in the labour market, such as the arts, humanities and social sciences. Young men, conversely, tend to enrol in and graduate from programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), which generally have greater labour market returns. Factors such as academic interests, achievement test scores, and high-school marks can affect later university program choice. Using the linked Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) - Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) data, the current paper examines the relationship between mathematics and science test scores at age 15 and first program choice in university, with a focus on differences in ability in mathematics and science by gender. Generally speaking, the results reveal that the intersection of gender and ability does matter; even young women of high mathematical ability are less likely to enter STEM fields than young men of similar or even lesser mathematical ability. This implies that something other than pure ability is affecting young women's likelihood of entering STEM programs in university.

    Release date: 2013-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2013001
    Description:

    The Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) is a national survey on the social and economic conditions of First Nations people living off reserve, Métis and Inuit aged 6 years and over. The 2012 APS represents the fourth cycle of the survey and focuses on issues of education, employment and health.

    The article "The Education and Employment Experiences of First Nations People Living Off Reserve, Inuit, and Métis: Selected Findings from the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey" describes education pathways, education experiences and current employment of adults aged 18 to 44 who were not attending high school at the time of data collection. It includes analyses of personal, family and school-related experiences during the last year of school, postsecondary education profiles and selected characteristics of workers, the unemployed and those not in the labour force. As well, the article addresses the subject of barriers to further education or training.

    Release date: 2013-11-25

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2012345
    Description:

    This study uses the 2007 National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) to compare hourly wage differences observed between apprentices who complete their programs and apprentices who discontinue their programs. The primary objective is to estimate the magnitude of the wage difference between these groups while taking into account a broad range of characteristics. Furthermore, wage comparisons are refined further by disaggregating apprentices into four mutually exclusive groups, defined on the basis of program completion and certification.

    Release date: 2012-10-03

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2012098
    Description:

    This report provides a profile of doctoral graduates from Ontario universities in the class of 2005 two years after graduation by examining their demographics and program characteristics. It also analyses their mobility patterns, with a particular focus on graduates who moved to the United States. Finally it examines the graduates' labour market outcomes, including employment rates, income, industry and the prevalence of over-qualification. The report compares the Ontario results with the aggregate results for doctoral graduates from universities in the rest of Canada as well as results from 2 previous cohorts of graduates; i.e. the classes of 2000 and 1995.

    The key data sources are the National Graduates Surveys (NGS) of 1995, 2000 and 2005. Supplementary information is also provided by the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED) and the 2006 Census.

    Release date: 2012-07-09

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201200111651
    Description:

    The Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey assessed four foundation skills thought to be essential for social, professional and economic success - prose literacy, document literacy, numeracy and problem solving. Eleven countries, including Canada, participated in the most recent Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey, which was conducted in two main waves between 2002 and 2008.This article summarizes the key findings reported in that report, focusing on problem-solving skills, their definition, distribution in the labour force and related labour market outcomes.

    Release date: 2012-05-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200211652
    Description:

    This study investigates job-related training of Canadian employees age 55 to 64. Using the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS) and several cycles of the Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS), it compares the training of older and core-age workers and tracks changes in the incidence and correlates of training over time.

    Release date: 2012-04-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-604-X
    Description:

    Literacy for Life, is the second report from the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey. It presents additional results on the nature and magnitude of the literacy gaps faced by OECD countries and how these gaps have evolved over the medium term.

    It offers new insights into the factors that influence the formation of adult skills in various settings - at home and at work - for the eleven countries participating in the first and last round of data collection between 2003 and 2008. The study offers comparative evidence on the impact of various factors on the supply of skill. The study offers a special focus on numeracy skills and problem solving skills. It explores the relationships between numeracy and key socio-demographic factors as well as labour market outcomes and earnings.

    It highlights the importance of problem solving skills by defining this foundational skill and by exploring its determinants as well as its relative role in influencing important labour market outcomes.

    The report offers also an analysis of performance across multiple skill domains. It investigates the skill profiles of various population groups defined in terms of the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of those who score at levels deemed to be low in one or more skill domains and explores the resulting consequences.

    The report concludes by investigating the issue of skill mismatch in the labour market and its relationship to adult learning. The extent and distribution of mismatch between the day to day literacy related requirements of workers and the literacy skills they have obtained is an important issue that is being explored in this study.

    Release date: 2011-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100311539
    Description:

    This study investigates job-related training taken by immigrant employees in Canada. Using the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), it examines the incidence, subject and objectives of, and satisfaction with, job-related training of immigrant and Canadian-born employees. Differences among sub-groups of immigrants are compared, as well as other characteristics related to the incidence of training. Perceptions of barriers to training among immigrants and the Canadian-born are also explored.

    Release date: 2011-08-30

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100211493
    Description:

    According to the 2008 Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), nearly 8 million adults between the ages of 25 and 64 took part in formal training activities or education between July 2007 and June 2008, and most of them did so for career- or job-related reasons. This article examines the participation of adult workers in formal, job-related training activities or education. The participation rates of adult workers are analyzed in relation to their demographic characteristics, occupation, employer characteristics, training objectives and learning obstacles.

    Release date: 2011-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011334
    Description:

    In this study, the long-term impact on earnings of attending post-secondary education institutions following job loss is estimated using a large longitudinal administrative database of Canadian workers. A difference-in-difference model is used for this purpose. The results suggest that, over the period spanning five years preceding and nine years following job loss, workers who attended post-secondary education shortly after displacement saw their earnings increase by almost $7,000 more than displaced workers who did not. Significant benefits are found by sex, age, marital status, and union coverage, with the exception of men aged 35 to 44 years. Despite the benefits of education, job displacement is found to be associated with only a modest increase in post-secondary education attendance for all groups examined.

    Release date: 2011-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201000611406
    Description:

    Between 2000 and 2008, Canada enjoyed steady, rapid employment growth, with an annual growth rate of 2%. Subsequently, as a result of the global economic downturn, Canada's labour market suffered substantial employment losses, particularly in late 2008 and the first few months of 2009.

    In this article, Labour Force Survey data are used to explore changes in employment in apprenticeable occupations over the 2008 to 2010 period, comparing those changes with those observed in all other occupations combined. Employment change is examined from the perspective of selected demographic characteristics, such as age group, level of education, sex and selected employment characteristics.

    Release date: 2011-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201000511367
    Description:

    This article draws a profile of trade qualifiers in 2007, using data from the Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS). A trade qualifier is a person who has not completed an apprenticeship program but has acquired enough practical work experience to write the examination to obtain the certificate of qualification (or certificate of competence) issued by the provincial or territorial authorities responsible for certifying trades workers. Trade qualifiers accounted for 43% of certificates of qualification issued in the apprenticeable trades in 2007.

    Release date: 2010-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2010080
    Description:

    This report looks at completion and discontinuation rates of registered apprentices using two longitudinal cohorts created from the Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS). These cohorts comprised registered apprentices who first enrolled in an apprenticeship program in 1994 or in 1995.

    The purpose of the study is to provide measures of completion of apprenticeship programs and information on the learning paths of the apprentices tracked over an 11-year period. It follows two other reports published in 2005 and in 2008, which examined the same issues. In those studies, results for three provinces - New Brunswick, Ontario and Alberta - were analyzed for the cohorts of new apprenticeship enrolees in the years 1992 and 1993. The current report includes three new provinces: Quebec, Manitoba and British Columbia.

    Completion and discontinuation are discussed in relation to the age of the apprentices, major trade groups, nominal duration of programs, time spent in the program for completers and discontinuers and whether or not the trade was covered by the Red Seal Interprovincial Standards Program. Detailed data tables provide information for individual trades in each of the six provinces.

    Release date: 2010-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200900611126
    Description:

    Lifelong learning is increasingly recognized as an important element in today's knowledge-based economy defined by rapid advancements in technology and constantly changing skill needs. Lifelong learning is supported by both formal education and training. Information on the participation of Canadian adults in education and training activities is provided by the Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS) 2003 and the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS) 2008. This article highlights some of the key findings of a recent Statistics Canada report that examined trends in adult education and training, based on data from these two surveys.

    Release date: 2010-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2009079
    Description:

    This report is based on the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), which was undertaken by Statistics Canada in partnership with Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). The ASETS brings together three previous education surveys that covered specific population groups: 1) the Survey of Approaches to Educational Planning (SAEP), which focused on 0 to 18 year olds; 2) the Post-Secondary Education Participation Survey (PEPS), which focused on 18 to 24 year olds; and 3) the Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS), which focused on 25 to 65 year olds. While these three surveys examined specific facets of Canadian's educational experience, their integration in the ASETS allows for a more holistic approach to collecting information on participation in and financing of education and training in Canada. While the ASETS can be used to undertake the same research as the PEPS, AETS and SAEP, it can also be used to address additional research not previously possible.

    The ASETS results presented in this report refer to activities undertaken between July 2007 and June 2008 reference period.

    Release date: 2009-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2009071
    Description:

    This document outlines the definitions and the typology now used by Statistics Canada's Centre for Education Statistics to identify, classify and delineate the universities, colleges and other providers of postsecondary and adult education in Canada for which basic enrolments, graduates, professors and finance statistics are produced.

    These new rigorous definitions were needed to capture the growing complexity of postsecondary education in Canada. They differentiate the various types of postsecondary institutions, address the blurring distinction between colleges and universities and handle the various forms of possible relationships between institutions.

    The document brings closure to the extensive consultation that took place between January 2003 and the spring of 2007 as it summarizes the changes made following the 2004 paper entitled "A New Understanding of Post-secondary Education in Canada: A Discussion Paper".

    Such an extensive consultation was deemed necessary to ensure that the typology is useful to the whole sector and that it allows comparisons between provinces and territories despite the significant differences of their respective postsecondary education systems.

    Release date: 2009-01-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008068
    Description:

    Using major Statistics Canada data sources related to the education and training of Canadians, this publication presents a jurisdictional view of what we currently know on educating health workers to begin to address some critical questions facing Canadians today: Does Canada have enough interested individuals with the right skills who want to work in health? Does it have the infrastructure, capacity, and effective education system to ensure an adequate supply of health workers to meet future health care demands?

    As such, this report reveals some important information about what happens before, during and after health education. It focuses on interest in health occupations, the number of students taking and graduating from postsecondary health programs along with their socio-demographic characteristics and those of the faculty teaching these programs, the labour market experiences of recent graduates from these programs - including their mobility after graduation - as well as the ongoing participation of health workers in formal and informal training.

    Release date: 2008-10-10

  • Articles and reports: 89-552-M2008020
    Description:

    Considerable research effort has been devoted to understanding earnings differences between immigrant and Canadian-born workers. Previous studies have established that immigrants typically earn less than Canadian-born workers with the same amount of education and work experience. The low earnings of immigrants are often attributed to the specificity of human capital to the country where it originates - in other words, education or work experience in the country of origin cannot be directly transferred to the host country, resulting in well qualified immigrants holding low paying jobs. Another possibility is that employers in the host country discriminate against immigrants. This paper uses data from the Canadian component of the International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS), which includes both standard demographic and labour market information for the Canadian born and immigrants and results from tests of literacy, numeracy and problem-solving skills, to investigate these issues. Interpreting the test scores as direct measurements of cognitive skills, the authors provide a closer examination of explanations for low immigrant earnings than has previously been possible. In addition, the data include more precise information on where education was obtained and age of migration than is available in most previous studies, further enabling scrutiny of immigrant-Canadian born earnings differentials.

    Release date: 2008-07-21

Reference (29)

Reference (29) (25 of 29 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3154
    Release date: 2017-06-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. The survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) and Statistics Canada. It is hoped that the findings will contribute to the ongoing dialogue by governments, industry and unions to ensure that the apprenticeship systems in Canada continue to respond to the demands of the 21st Century.

    Release date: 2017-03-29

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2017001
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2015 looks at various factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through previous surveys on apprentices, the last one completed in 2007. The 2015 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Employment and Social Development Canada and Statistics Canada.

    A sample of over 28,000 respondents – who had either completed or discontinued an apprenticeship program between 2011 and 2013 – was collected.

    The Canada Overview Report presents a profile of apprentices and their experiences in apprenticeship programs in Canada, including technical training and on-the-job training; challenges and difficulties faced; awareness and use of financial support programs; the certification process, including Red Seal; labour market outcomes and job satisfaction; interprovincial mobility; and attitudes about skilled trades.

    Release date: 2017-03-29

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4406
    Release date: 2013-10-08

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5151
    Release date: 2009-11-25

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 2615
    Release date: 2009-02-05

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008001
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008002
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008003
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008004
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008005
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008006
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008007
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008009
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008008
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3879
    Release date: 2004-04-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3142
    Release date: 2003-03-27

  • Technical products: 81-593-X
    Description:

    This Pan-Canadian Education Research Agenda (PCERA) 2001 symposium report documents the proceedings of a symposium held at Laval University in Québec on May 22 and 23, 2001. The symposium, which was held in conjunction with the Canadian Society for the Study of Education (CSSE) and the Canadian Society for the Study of Higher Education (CSSHE) during the Annual Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities, explored research and policy issues related to the role of teacher education/educator training, teacher/educator supply and demand, teacher/educator professional development, indicators of success, and leadership.

    This report includes summaries of speeches, discussions and research presentations, as well as research paper abstracts and the researchers' biographies. According to the report, new teachers and educators will need more support and resources to succeed. Professional growth plans and other professional development strategies for teachers and educators should be investigated to effectively promote lifelong learning. The report suggests that partnerships between universities and schools could strengthen teacher training programs.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Technical products: 81-586-X
    Description:

    In today's emerging knowledge societies, the capacity of labour markets, firms and individuals to adjust to change, improve productivity and capitalize on technological innovation depends in large measure on the skills of the adult population. Improving the stock of skills available to the economy through investment in adult education and workplace learning has therefore become an issue of considerable strategic importance. But how are the Canadian markets for adult education and training evolving?

    This report presents, for the first time, evidence on the development of adult education and training in Canada during the last decade. Examined are not only broad trends in the demand and supply of adult education, but also the factors contributing to observed developments. Survey data collected in 1998 allow readers to gauge the current situation and make comparisons over time and across Canadian provinces. The findings indicate, first, that growth in adult education participation has slowed in recent years, and second, that there are major differences between the provinces in who gets trained, and how much.

    Release date: 2001-05-29

  • Technical products: 81-586-X19980015873
    Description:

    In this chapter, the patterns of participation in education and training as well as demand and supply characteristics of Canadian adult education and training are examined.

    Release date: 2001-05-10

  • Technical products: 81-586-X19980015872
    Description:

    The purpose of this report is to describe the extent to which Canadians engage in various formal and organised adult education and training activites, and how participation differs both over time and across provinces.

    Release date: 2001-05-10

  • Technical products: 81-586-X19980015874
    Description:

    The purpose of this chapter is to present, for the first time, an overview of major trends in Canadian adult education and training. Data from a series of national adult education and training surveys have been brought together for analytical purposes for the first time.

    Release date: 2001-05-10

  • Technical products: 81-586-X19980015875
    Description:

    An analysis of the demand and supply of adult education and training in Canada was presented in Chapter 1, using data derived from the 1998 Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS). Chapter 2 examined major trends in adult education and training incidence and volume, drawing on national survey data collected over 15 years. This concluding chapter is an overview and discussion of the main findings. It also indicated some potential direction for future research.

    Release date: 2001-05-10

  • Index and guides: 81-580-X
    Description:

    The adult education and training sector is as complex as it is dynamic. In order to describe all its facets, Statistics Canada surveys many different populations. Given the number of data sources and their conceptual and methodological differences, it is sometimes very difficult for researchers and decision makers to obtain required information or data. This guide is a tool that has been developed to assist them. It provides a summary description of all Statistics Canada surveys related to adult education and training. From a selected variable, it allows the identification of surveys that can provide information. It also indicates relevant publications and how to obtain additional information.

    Release date: 1997-03-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89F0094X
    Description:

    The Backgrounder on the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) describes the history of the survey and how literacy is measured.

    Release date: 1996-09-12

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