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All (11) (11 of 11 results)

  • Index and guides: 81-582-G
    Description:

    This handbook complements the tables of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP). It is a guide that provides general descriptions for each indicator and indicator component. PCEIP has five broad indicator sets: a portrait of the school-age population; financing education systems; elementary and secondary education; postsecondary education; and transitions and outcomes.

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) is a joint venture of Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada.

    Release date: 2018-03-21

  • Table: 81-582-X
    Description:

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) draws from a wide variety of data sources to provide information on the school-age population, elementary, secondary and postsecondary education, transitions, and labour market outcomes.

    PCEIP products include tables, fact sheets, reports and a methodological handbook. They present indicators for all of Canada, the provinces, the territories, as well as selected international comparisons and comparisons over time.

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) is an ongoing initiative of the Canadian Education Statistics Council, a partnership between Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada that provides a set of statistical measures on education systems in Canada.

    Release date: 2018-03-21

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-599-X
    Description:

    The fact sheets in this series provide an "at-a-glance" overview of particular aspects of education in Canada and summarize key data trends in selected tables published as part of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP).

    The PCEIP mission is to publish a set of statistical measures on education systems in Canada for policy makers, practitioners and the general public to monitor the performance of education systems across jurisdictions and over time. PCEIP is a joint venture of Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (CMEC).

    Release date: 2018-02-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-604-X
    Description:

    This report is a product of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP). It is intended to facilitate the comparison of educational systems in Canada's provinces and territories with those of countries that belong to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The document presents a series of indicators harmonized to the definitions and methodologies used by the OECD in Education at a Glance. The indicators are designed to serve as a basis for decision making and for development of programs in the field of education.

    PCEIP is an ongoing initiative of the Canadian Education Statistics Council: a partnership between Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada, that provides a set of statistical measures on education systems.

    Release date: 2018-02-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2010081
    Description:

    International comparisons show that the percentage of both college- and university-educated workers who earn less than half of the median employment income is higher than in Canada than in most, if not all, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. Data from Statistics Canada's Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) show that 18% of university-educated adults and 23% of college-educated adults aged 25 to 64 in Canada earned less than half the national median employment income in 2006.

    This study uses descriptive statistics and logistic regression techniques in order to shed light on the type of highly educated worker who is likely to fall into lower employment earnings, taking into account a range of characteristics, including age, sex, field of study, occupation and industry. While all of the workers in the study population had non-zero employment earnings, many of them reported an activity other than working as their main activity for the year, a key factor in explaining their low-earnings situation. Other factors associated with having a college or university education while also having low employment earnings include being self-employed, working in certain occupations or industries and being female.

    Release date: 2010-04-21

  • Articles and reports: 81-599-X2009004
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides information on the proportion of the school-age population - defined as children and youth aged 5 to 24 - living in low-income circumstances, including the duration of low-income spells, using data from Statistics Canada's Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). The percentage of children in low-income is calculated based on Statistics Canada's low income cut-offs (LICOs), using data on family income after government benefits are received and after federal and provincial taxes are paid.

    Release date: 2009-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006039
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) this study examines the labour market experience of Canadians who hold a university diploma and who worked at least one month in a job requiring no more than a high school diploma between 1993 and 2001.

    Release date: 2006-04-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006036
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) this study examines the labour market outcomes of private college graduates. A comparison between 1993 and 2003 shows private colleges lost market share, mainly because women were less interested in secretarial sciences. In 2003, graduates from private business schools earned about the same as high school graduates annually. However, private college graduates showed a 7% higher probability of being employed compared to high school graduates.

    Release date: 2006-02-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005036
    Description:

    This report builds on previous research examining the role of family income in postsecondary education. The paper attempts to address three broad questions using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). First, has the postsecondary education participation pattern changed in the recent past either for college and university participation, or for youth of various backgrounds? Second, how are the socio-economic factors related to postsecondary participation? Does the impact of socio-economic factors differ for college and university participation? Thirdly, for those who did pursue postsecondary education, which factors are more important in the choice of institution - university versus college?

    Release date: 2005-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002191
    Description:

    This study assesses how geographic distance between home and school affects the probability of attending university shortly after high school graduation. Students that grow up near a university can save on costs by staying home to attend the local university and thus may be more likely to attend. Using the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, a database of Canadian university postal codes and a special postal code conversion file that calculates the geographic co-ordinates of postal codes, it was possible to estimate the straight-line distances between the homes of high school students prior to graduating and the nearest university. After controlling for family income, parental education and other factors associated with university participation, students living 'out-of-commuting distance' are far less likely to attend than are students living 'within commuting distance.' Distance also plays a role in the relationship between university participation and its other correlates, such as family income and sex.

    Release date: 2002-06-24

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

Analysis (8)

Analysis (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-599-X
    Description:

    The fact sheets in this series provide an "at-a-glance" overview of particular aspects of education in Canada and summarize key data trends in selected tables published as part of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP).

    The PCEIP mission is to publish a set of statistical measures on education systems in Canada for policy makers, practitioners and the general public to monitor the performance of education systems across jurisdictions and over time. PCEIP is a joint venture of Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (CMEC).

    Release date: 2018-02-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-604-X
    Description:

    This report is a product of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP). It is intended to facilitate the comparison of educational systems in Canada's provinces and territories with those of countries that belong to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The document presents a series of indicators harmonized to the definitions and methodologies used by the OECD in Education at a Glance. The indicators are designed to serve as a basis for decision making and for development of programs in the field of education.

    PCEIP is an ongoing initiative of the Canadian Education Statistics Council: a partnership between Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada, that provides a set of statistical measures on education systems.

    Release date: 2018-02-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2010081
    Description:

    International comparisons show that the percentage of both college- and university-educated workers who earn less than half of the median employment income is higher than in Canada than in most, if not all, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. Data from Statistics Canada's Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) show that 18% of university-educated adults and 23% of college-educated adults aged 25 to 64 in Canada earned less than half the national median employment income in 2006.

    This study uses descriptive statistics and logistic regression techniques in order to shed light on the type of highly educated worker who is likely to fall into lower employment earnings, taking into account a range of characteristics, including age, sex, field of study, occupation and industry. While all of the workers in the study population had non-zero employment earnings, many of them reported an activity other than working as their main activity for the year, a key factor in explaining their low-earnings situation. Other factors associated with having a college or university education while also having low employment earnings include being self-employed, working in certain occupations or industries and being female.

    Release date: 2010-04-21

  • Articles and reports: 81-599-X2009004
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides information on the proportion of the school-age population - defined as children and youth aged 5 to 24 - living in low-income circumstances, including the duration of low-income spells, using data from Statistics Canada's Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). The percentage of children in low-income is calculated based on Statistics Canada's low income cut-offs (LICOs), using data on family income after government benefits are received and after federal and provincial taxes are paid.

    Release date: 2009-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006039
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) this study examines the labour market experience of Canadians who hold a university diploma and who worked at least one month in a job requiring no more than a high school diploma between 1993 and 2001.

    Release date: 2006-04-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006036
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) this study examines the labour market outcomes of private college graduates. A comparison between 1993 and 2003 shows private colleges lost market share, mainly because women were less interested in secretarial sciences. In 2003, graduates from private business schools earned about the same as high school graduates annually. However, private college graduates showed a 7% higher probability of being employed compared to high school graduates.

    Release date: 2006-02-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005036
    Description:

    This report builds on previous research examining the role of family income in postsecondary education. The paper attempts to address three broad questions using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). First, has the postsecondary education participation pattern changed in the recent past either for college and university participation, or for youth of various backgrounds? Second, how are the socio-economic factors related to postsecondary participation? Does the impact of socio-economic factors differ for college and university participation? Thirdly, for those who did pursue postsecondary education, which factors are more important in the choice of institution - university versus college?

    Release date: 2005-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002191
    Description:

    This study assesses how geographic distance between home and school affects the probability of attending university shortly after high school graduation. Students that grow up near a university can save on costs by staying home to attend the local university and thus may be more likely to attend. Using the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, a database of Canadian university postal codes and a special postal code conversion file that calculates the geographic co-ordinates of postal codes, it was possible to estimate the straight-line distances between the homes of high school students prior to graduating and the nearest university. After controlling for family income, parental education and other factors associated with university participation, students living 'out-of-commuting distance' are far less likely to attend than are students living 'within commuting distance.' Distance also plays a role in the relationship between university participation and its other correlates, such as family income and sex.

    Release date: 2002-06-24

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Index and guides: 81-582-G
    Description:

    This handbook complements the tables of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP). It is a guide that provides general descriptions for each indicator and indicator component. PCEIP has five broad indicator sets: a portrait of the school-age population; financing education systems; elementary and secondary education; postsecondary education; and transitions and outcomes.

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) is a joint venture of Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada.

    Release date: 2018-03-21

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