Statistics by subject – Housing and dwelling characteristics

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  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017017
    Description:

    Based on the data from the 2016 Census, the following infographic looks at dwellings in Canada including the census metropolitan areas.

    Release date: 2017-05-03

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-03-20

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-01-27

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-08-30

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015054
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series uses data from the latest cycles of the Survey of Household Spending and the Survey of Financial Security to examine trends in the implicit income derived from owner-occupied housing. Covering the 1969-to-2011 period, the article updates previous estimates of the returns to housing in order to assess the implications of the shifting economic environment of the late 2000s.

    Release date: 2015-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-630-X2015007
    Description:

    In this edition of Canadian Megatrends, we look at evolution of housing in Canada from 1957 to 2014.

    Release date: 2015-10-28

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-12-12

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-629-X2015020
    Description:

    Jerry Situ, Senior analyst presents a brief overview of housing in Canada, 2011 National Household Survey.

    Release date: 2013-09-11

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-08-14

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-08-07

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-01-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2013083
    Description:

    This paper examines why rates of homeownership have been increasing amongst young higher-income households, but declining among young lower-income households. For the period from 1981 to 2006, household data from the Census of Population, supplemented with information from the Survey of Financial Security, are employed to model the decision to own across the income distribution. The model assesses whether housing market conditions (e.g., the cost of renting versus owning), the financial condition of households (e.g., whether the household has sufficient wealth to make a standard down payment), and demographic factors (e.g., changing family composition) account for these diverging trends in housing demand.

    Release date: 2013-01-29

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-629-X2015014
    Description:

    Laurent Martel, Demography Expert, presents the highlights of the 2011 Census Population and dwelling counts.

    Release date: 2012-02-08

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110647
    Description:

    Between 1985 and 2006, the percentage of Canadians living in dwellings where someone in the household was the owner gradually increased from about 70% to 78%.

    Release date: 2008-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810113202
    Description:

    Since shelter is the biggest expenditure most households make, its affordability can have a big impact on their wellbeing. Measuring affordability involves comparing housing costs with a household's ability to meet them. Up to now, affordability has been measured at a particular time. New information enables a first-ever longitudinal review of housing affordability. This article examines the likelihood of spending 30% or more of household income on shelter, how often this occurs and whether it is occasional or persistent.

    Release date: 2008-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200700910332
    Description:

    This article finds that the volume of infrastructure capital has rebounded since 2000 after two decades of neglect. While infrastructure growth has been similar across regions, there are sharp differences in the type of asset targeted by the regions, especially when spending slowed after 1980.

    Release date: 2007-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200611113174
    Description:

    A household's ability to afford housing has traditionally been measured using income information derived from the census. A household spending 30% or more of its income on shelter was considered to have a shelter-cost burden. The Survey of Household Spending provides an alternative denominator based on total household spending.

    Release date: 2006-12-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-613-M
    Description:

    This series of reports provides key background information on the trends and conditions in Canadian census metropolitan areas (CMAs) across a number of dimensions. Subjects covered include demographics, housing, immigration, Aboriginal persons, low-income and stressed neighbourhoods, economic conditions, health, location of work and commuting mode, and culture. Most reports cover the 1981-to-2001 period.

    Release date: 2006-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038969
    Description:

    The housing transition patterns of seniors had been the focus of some attention in 2004 against a backdrop of concerns about the dwindling demand for rental properties. This article takes a closer look at seniors who downsize, those who upsize and others who move for lifestyle reasons. It identifies the characteristics of senior movers, the life events associated with their move, and the various types of housing transitions they made.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028451
    Description:

    Age brings limitations that affect where, how and with whom people live. One of the concerns that seniors may face is affordable housing. This may be a particular concern for those seniors who lose a spouse and are faced with reduced household income while shelter costs remain unchanged. Using data from the 2001 Census of Population and the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS), this article looks at who seniors live with and the affordability of their homes.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005253
    Description:

    This article summarizes findings from the research paper entitled Are immigrants buying to get in? The role of ethnic clustering on the homeownership propensities of 12 Toronto immigrant groups, 1996-2001. Spatial assimilation theory is a model of status attainment that links the spatial and social positions of minority group members (Massey and Denton 1985). If applied to immigrants, the model would suggest that immigrants would first cluster in typically poor neighbourhoods with high concentrations of co-ethnics, but that ethnic concentration should be temporary and of declining utility. Once an immigrant family's socioeconomic status improves, they should merge into the residential 'mainstream' by moving to a better, and typically less segregated, neighbourhood (Massey and Denton 1985). Further, although housing tenure is not an explicit dimension of spatial assimilation theory, given the well-established relationship between income, human capital and homeownership (Balakrishnan and Wu 1992; Laryea 1999), and the importance of homeownership as an indicator of well-being and residential assimilation (Myers and Lee 1998), part of an immigrant family's socioeconomic ascent should be a shift from tenant to homeowner (Alba and Logan 1992). Spatial assimilation theory would further predict that same-group concentration should be inversely related to homeownership since ethnic enclaves are typically conceived of as poor rental zones (Fong and Gulia 1999; Myles and Hou 2004).

    Recent research (Alba and Nee 2003; Logan, Alba, and Zhang 2002), however, finds that some immigrant groups may be choosing against spatial assimilation to form more durable 'ethnic communities' (Logan, Alba, and Zhang 2002), giving rise to a positive and growing 'enclave effect' on homeownership (Borjas 2002). In this paper, an enclave effect is evaluated as an explanation for the 1996-2001 homeownership patterns of Toronto's 12 largest recent immigrant groups. Using longitudinally-consistent and temporally-antecedent 1996 neighbourhood ethnic composition data this paper aims to determine if immigrants buy homes outside their enclaves or prefer an owner-occupied neighbourhood of same-group members. To this end, the paper discusses the potential benefits of living and buying in an enclave; it develops a predictive framework for determining which groups might benefit from owner-occupied ethnic communities; it also examines the issue of 'neighbourhood disequilibrium' and evaluates the enclave effect on homeownership using a sample of recent (1996-2001) movers, their 1996 neighbourhood ethnic characteristics, and bivariate probit models with sample selection corrections (Van de Ven and Van Praag 1981).

    Release date: 2005-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005252
    Description:

    Numerous studies equate immigrant homeownership with assimilation into the residential mainstream, though only rarely is this claim verified by studying the ethnic character of neighbourhoods where immigrants actually buy homes. In this paper, the 1996 and 2001 Census of Canada master files and bivariate probit models with sample selection corrections (a.k.a. Heckman probit models) are used to assess the neighbourhood-level ethnic determinants of homeownership in Toronto, Canada. By determining whether low levels of ethnic concentration accompany a home purchase, it can be assessed whether immigrants exit their enclaves in search of a home in the 'promised land', as traditional assimilation theory suggests, or if some now seek homes in the 'ethnic communities' that Logan, Alba and Zhang (2002) recently introduced in the American Sociological Review. Assessing the role of concentration under equilibrium conditions, evidence emerges that same-group concentration affects the propensity of several group members to buy homes.

    Release date: 2005-05-26

Reference (35)

Reference (35) (25 of 35 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3508
    Release date: 2017-01-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5213
    Release date: 2016-08-30

  • Index and guides: 92-140-X
    Description:

    Before each Census of Population, Statistics Canada carries out a three- to four-year process to review the content of the census questionnaires in consultation with census data users, performing tests and developing questionnaire content to ensure that it takes into account the evolution of Canadian society. Factors considered in developing the content include legislative requirements regarding information, program and policy requirements; the burden placed on respondents to respond to questions; concerns about privacy; feedback from consultations and tests; data quality; costs and operational considerations; the comparability of data with earlier data and the availability of alternative data sources. Before each census, Statistics Canada tests the questionnaire content through an extensive test. The content report presents the analyses conducted from the data collected from this test and the results that are used to fine tune the questionnaires, the methodology and the systems used for the Census Program.

    Release date: 2016-04-01

  • Index and guides: 92-140-X2016001
    Description:

    The 2016 Census Program Content Test was conducted from May 2 to June 30, 2014. The Test was designed to assess the impact of any proposed content changes to the 2016 Census Program and to measure the impact of including a social insurance number (SIN) question on the data quality.

    This quantitative test used a split-panel design involving 55,000 dwellings, divided into 11 panels of 5,000 dwellings each: five panels were dedicated to the Content Test while the remaining six panels were for the SIN Test. Two models of test questionnaires were developed to meet the objectives, namely a model with all the proposed changes EXCEPT the SIN question and a model with all the proposed changes INCLUDING the SIN question. A third model of 'control' questionnaire with the 2011 content was also developed. The population living in a private dwelling in mail-out areas in one of the ten provinces was targeted for the test. Paper and electronic response channels were part of the Test as well.

    This report presents the Test objectives, the design and a summary of the analysis in order to determine potential content for the 2016 Census Program. Results from the data analysis of the Test were not the only elements used to determine the content for 2016. Other elements were also considered, such as response burden, comparison over time and users’ needs.

    Release date: 2016-04-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5162
    Release date: 2010-10-29

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2010003
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 2006 Survey of Household Spending. These quality indicators, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, slippage rates and imputation rates, help users interpret the survey data.

    Release date: 2010-04-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2010001
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 2004 Survey of Household Spending. These quality indicators, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, slippage rates and imputation rates, help users interpret the survey data.

    Release date: 2010-04-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2010002
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 2005 Survey of Household Spending. These quality indicators, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, slippage rates and imputation rates, help users interpret the survey data.

    Release date: 2010-04-26

  • Index and guides: 97-554-G2006003
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following variable: Housing and dwelling characteristics.

    Provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2006 Census. Each guide contains definitions and explanations on census concepts, data quality and historical comparability. Additional information will be included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the census.

    Release date: 2008-05-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2008001
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending, which gathers information on the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 1999.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. One section describes the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, aggregates and medians).

    Release date: 2008-02-26

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2008001
    Description:

    Shelter is the biggest expenditure most households make and its affordability can have an impact on the wellbeing of household members. For this reason, housing affordability is closely watched by a wide range of stakeholders - from housing advocates to policy analysts - interested in the welfare of Canadians. Measuring affordability involves comparing housing costs to a household's ability to meet them. One common measure is the shelter-cost-to-income-ratio (STIR). The 30% level is commonly accepted as the upper limit for affordable housing. Housing affordability is also a critical input to Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation's core housing need indicator which is used by governments to help design, deliver, fund and evaluate social housing programs. This report, jointly authored by Statistics Canada and CMHC, focuses purely on the dynamics of housing affordability, not on core housing need. It examines the likelihood of spending 30% or more of household income on shelter, how often this occurs, whether it is occasional or persistent, and contrasts those spending 30% or more to those spending less. Cross-sectional estimates indicate that around 19% of Canadians lived in households spending more than the affordability benchmark in 2002. Longitudinally however, less than 9% lived in households that spent above the benchmark in each year between 2002 and 2004, while another 19% lived in households spending above the benchmark for either one or two years. The attributes associated with the highest probabilities of living in a household spending above the affordability benchmark were: living alone, being a female lone parent, renting, being an immigrant, or living in Vancouver or Toronto. In addition, those living in households experiencing some kind of transition between 2002 and 2004 period had a higher probability of exceeding the benchmark at least once during the period. Such transitions included renters with a change in rent-subsidy status, those who changed from owner to renter or vice versa, those who changed family type (for example, marrying or divorcing), and those who moved between cities. Notably, those experiencing these transitions did not exceed the benchmark persistently.

    Release date: 2008-01-25

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2006001
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending, which gathers information on the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 1999.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. One section describes the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, aggregates and medians).

    Release date: 2006-12-12

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2006007
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the data available from SLID on housing characteristics and shelter costs, with a special focus on the imputation methods used for this data. From 1994 to 2001, the survey covered only a few housing characteristics, primarily ownership status and dwelling type. In 2002, with the start of sponsorship from Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), several other characteristics and detailed shelter costs were added to the survey. Several imputation methods were also introduced at that time, in order to replace missing values due to survey non-response and to provide utility costs, which contribute to total shelter costs. These methods take advantage of SLID's longitudinal design and also use data from other sources such as the Labour Force Survey and the Census. In June 2006, further improvements in the imputation methods were introduced for 2004 and applied to past years in a historical revision. This report also documents that revision.

    Release date: 2006-07-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4403
    Release date: 2006-04-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2005007
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending, which gathers information on the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 1999.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. One section describes the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, aggregates and medians).

    Release date: 2005-12-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2005006
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 2003 Survey of Household Spending. These quality indicators, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, slippage rates and imputation rates, help users interpret the survey data.

    Release date: 2005-10-06

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2005010
    Description:

    For some time, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) has used data on housing characteristics and housing-related expenditures from the Census of Population. Although the Census data source serves CMHC's purposes to a large extent, the federal government agency turned to the annual household surveys of Statistics Canada to provide information on a more frequent basis. This would allow them to have a better picture of annual trends, and perhaps have a greater choice of other characteristics with which to cross housing data on Canadian households. In 2001, CMHC began to sponsor additional content in both the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) and the Survey of Household Spending (SHS), starting with reference year 2002.

    Release date: 2005-07-22

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2004003
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending, which gathers information on the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households.

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. One section describes the statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share and aggregates).

    Release date: 2004-12-13

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2004001
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 2002 Survey of Household Spending. These quality indicators, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, slippage rates and imputation rates, help users interpret the survey data.

    Release date: 2004-09-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2003002
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Conducted in January, February and March after the reference year, data are collected via personal interview using a paper questionnaire. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 2001.) This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share and aggregates).

    Release date: 2003-12-17

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3886
    Release date: 2003-11-18

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2002001
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 2000 Survey of Household Spending. It covers the usual quality indicators that help users interpret the data, such as coefficients of variation, non-response rates, slippage rates and imputation rates.

    Release date: 2002-06-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001004
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Data are collected via personal interview conducted in January, February and March after the reference year using a paper questionnaire. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the ten provinces. (The three territories are surveyed every second year starting in 2001.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, and aggregates).

    Release date: 2001-12-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001003
    Description:

    This document provides a detailed description of the methodology of the Survey of Household Spending. Topics covered include: target population; sample design; data collection; data processing; weighting and estimation; estimation of sampling error; and data suppression and confidentiality.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001001
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 1998 Survey of Household Spending. It covers the usual quality indicators that help users interpret data, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, imputation rates and the impact of imputed data on the estimates. Added to these are various less often used indicators such as slippage rates and measures of the representativity of the sample for particular characteristics that are useful for evaluating the survey methodology.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

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