Statistics by subject – Families, households and housing

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  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2003002
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Conducted in January, February and March after the reference year, data are collected via personal interview using a paper questionnaire. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 2001.) This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share and aggregates).

    Release date: 2003-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036619
    Description:

    This article examines the characteristics of grandparents in Canada, with a focus on those who share homes with their grandchildren.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200311013102
    Description:

    This article examines the changes to family wealth during the economic boom of 1984 to 1999. In the absence of longitudinal data, changes in family wealth can be estimated using cohorts of 'similar' families from two points in time.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Index and guides: 92-381-X
    Description:

    This report presents the concepts relating to census families and economic families. It discusses the changes made to the definition of the census family for 2001, and how historical comparability is affected. The report also describes aspects of data collection and processing that could have an impact on the quality of the variable Relationship to Person 1, and how this variable, along with the related demographic variables - sex, age, marital status and common-law status - is processed to ensure consistency and to produce derived variables at the family level.

    Release date: 2003-11-25

  • Table: 94F0044X
    Description:

    This profile contains information from the 2001 Census for federal electoral districts. A federal electoral district is an area represented by a member of Parliament (MP) elected to the House of Commons. This profile presents data for both the 1996 Representation Order (301 federal electoral districts) and the 2003 Representation Order (308 federal electoral districts). Data characteristics presented for a Federal electoral district include age, marital status, visible minority groups, immigration, mother tongue, education, income, work, families, dwellings and religion. As well, mapping functionality is now available for both representation orders.

    Release date: 2003-10-29

  • Index and guides: 92-380-X
    Description:

    This report focuses on five demographic variables: date of birth, age, sex, marital status and common-law status. The report describes how the data were collected, verified, processed, edited and imputed. The final section covers how the data were evaluated.

    Release date: 2003-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026622
    Description:

    This study examines the time volunteers, friends or relatives devote to unpaid informal care.

    Release date: 2003-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026620
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which never-married and previously married people who have never lived common-law in the past would be willing to do so in the future.

    Release date: 2003-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026634
    Description:

    This article compares the demographic, social and economic situation of couples who are far apart, and those who are close together, in age.

    Release date: 2003-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003207
    Description:

    The estimation of intergenerational earnings mobility is rife with measurement problems since the research does not observe permanent, lifetime earnings. Nearly all studies make corrections for mean variation in earnings because of the age differences among respondents. Recent works employ average earnings or instrumental variable methods to address the effects of measurement error as a result of transitory earnings shocks and mis-reporting. However, empirical studies of intergenerational mobility have paid no attention to the changes in earnings variance across the life cycle suggested by economic models of human capital investment.

    Using information from the Intergenerational Income Data from Canada and the National Longitudinal Survey and Panel Study of Income Dynamics from the United States, this study finds a strong association between age at observation and estimated earnings persistence. Part of this age-dependence is related to a general increase in transitory earnings variance during the collection of data. An independent effect of life cycle investment is also identified. These findings are then applied to the variation among intergenerational earnings persistence studies. Among studies with similar methodologies, one-third of the variance in published estimates of earnings persistence is attributable to cross-study differences in the age of responding fathers. Finally, these results call into question tests for the importance of credit constraints based on measures of earnings at different points in the life cycle.

    Release date: 2003-08-05

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-585-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered "Yes" to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 8,000 children (aged 0 to 14) living in households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the children's component of the survey. Persons living in institutions, on Indian reserves, and in the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut were excluded. The data were collected after the 2001 Census, between September 2001 and January 2002. Note that information on children with disabilities was gathered through interviews with their parents or guardians.

    Using the PALS data, this article describes the lives of children aged 5 to 14 who have disabilities and the impact of their disability on the daily activities and employment situation of their families.

    Specific themes covered are:-help with everyday activities received by children with disabilities;-parents access to formal and informal help;-impacts of the child's disability on the family's employment situation;-children's access to specialized aids and services; and-household income.

    Release date: 2003-07-29

  • Table: 97F0019X2001041
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Earnings of Canadians," which presents 2001 Census data on the employment earnings (wages and salaries, net income from non-farm unincorporated business and/or professional practice and net farm self-employment income) of Canadians in 2000. The data also include earnings by sex, age and geographic area, as well as for certain population groups (such as immigrants). This topic also features educational attainment and employment earnings for different population groups.

    It is possible to subscribe to all day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0019XIE2001041.

    Release date: 2003-07-24

  • Table: 97F0019X2001052
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Earnings of Canadians", which shows 2001 Census data on the employment earnings (wages and salaries, net income from non-farm unincorporated business and/or professional practice and net farm self-employment income) of Canadians in 2000. The data also include earnings by sex, age and geographic area, as well as for certain population groups (such as immigrants). This topic also features educational attainment and employment earnings for different population groups.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0019XIE2001052.

    Release date: 2003-07-24

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2003002
    Description:

    This study explores how the recent transition to a conjugal union affects time use, the division of labour, perceptions of time and well-being differently for women and men.

    Release date: 2003-07-21

  • Table: 95F0493X
    Description:

    This 2001 Census profile shows income of individuals, families and households and earnings variables.

    The profiles provide a statistical overview of various geographic areas based on a large number of detailed variables. Groups of variables, referred to as electronic components of profiles, was made available in each of the eight major releases. Together they form a complete profile.

    The profiles are part of the census standard data products, which are data tables extracted from the 2001 Census database.

    They contain statistical information about all population, household, dwelling and family characteristics.

    Release date: 2003-07-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016552
    Description:

    This article looks at 'living apart together' (LAT) relationships where unmarried couples who live in separate residences maintain an intimate relationship.

    Release date: 2003-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016529
    Description:

    This update outlines the major changes that have occurred within families and to their living arrangements over the last 20 years.

    Release date: 2003-06-10

  • Table: 95F0379X2001005
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and forward sortation areas.

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0377X2001002
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: census metropolitan area, tracted census aglomerations and census tracts.

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0379X2001001
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions, census subdivisions and dissemination areas.

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0379X2001002
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: census metropolitan areas, tracted census agglomerations and census tracts.

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0378X2001005
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and forward sortation areas.

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0379X2001006
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions and census subdivisions.

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0379X2001003
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districts (1996 Representation Order.

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0377X2001003
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districtas (1996 Representation Order).

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

Data (59)

Data (59) (25 of 59 results)

  • Table: 94F0044X
    Description:

    This profile contains information from the 2001 Census for federal electoral districts. A federal electoral district is an area represented by a member of Parliament (MP) elected to the House of Commons. This profile presents data for both the 1996 Representation Order (301 federal electoral districts) and the 2003 Representation Order (308 federal electoral districts). Data characteristics presented for a Federal electoral district include age, marital status, visible minority groups, immigration, mother tongue, education, income, work, families, dwellings and religion. As well, mapping functionality is now available for both representation orders.

    Release date: 2003-10-29

  • Table: 97F0019X2001041
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Earnings of Canadians," which presents 2001 Census data on the employment earnings (wages and salaries, net income from non-farm unincorporated business and/or professional practice and net farm self-employment income) of Canadians in 2000. The data also include earnings by sex, age and geographic area, as well as for certain population groups (such as immigrants). This topic also features educational attainment and employment earnings for different population groups.

    It is possible to subscribe to all day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0019XIE2001041.

    Release date: 2003-07-24

  • Table: 97F0019X2001052
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Earnings of Canadians", which shows 2001 Census data on the employment earnings (wages and salaries, net income from non-farm unincorporated business and/or professional practice and net farm self-employment income) of Canadians in 2000. The data also include earnings by sex, age and geographic area, as well as for certain population groups (such as immigrants). This topic also features educational attainment and employment earnings for different population groups.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0019XIE2001052.

    Release date: 2003-07-24

  • Table: 95F0493X
    Description:

    This 2001 Census profile shows income of individuals, families and households and earnings variables.

    The profiles provide a statistical overview of various geographic areas based on a large number of detailed variables. Groups of variables, referred to as electronic components of profiles, was made available in each of the eight major releases. Together they form a complete profile.

    The profiles are part of the census standard data products, which are data tables extracted from the 2001 Census database.

    They contain statistical information about all population, household, dwelling and family characteristics.

    Release date: 2003-07-14

  • Table: 95F0379X2001005
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and forward sortation areas.

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0377X2001002
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: census metropolitan area, tracted census aglomerations and census tracts.

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0379X2001001
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions, census subdivisions and dissemination areas.

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0379X2001002
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: census metropolitan areas, tracted census agglomerations and census tracts.

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0378X2001005
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and forward sortation areas.

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0379X2001006
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions and census subdivisions.

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0379X2001003
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districts (1996 Representation Order.

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0377X2001003
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districtas (1996 Representation Order).

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0379X2001004
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations.

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 95F0379XIE2001004.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0377X2001004
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations.

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 95F0377XIE2001004.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0377X2001001
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions, census subdivisions and dissemination areas.

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0377X2001006
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions and census subdivisions.

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0378X2001003
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districts (1996 Representation Order).

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0378X2001002
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: census metropolitan areas, tracted census agglomerations and census tracts.

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0378X2001004
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations areas.

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 95F0378XIE2001004.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0378X2001001
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions, census subdivisions and dissemination areas.

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0377X2001005
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, and forward sortation areas.

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 95F0378X2001006
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions and census subdivisions.

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. This topic also presents data on presence of children. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyse labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared to the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-05-14

  • Table: 97F0021X2001005
    Description:

    This table is part of the "Social and Economic Characteristics of Individuals, Families and Households" topic, which shows 2001 Census data on social and economic characteristics at the family level, including labour force activity of parents with young children, and data on housing costs, including gross rent, owner's major payments, housing affordability and owner's expected selling price.

    This table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Social and Economic Characteristics of Individuals, Families and Households, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F0021XCB2001000.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0021XIE2001005.

    Release date: 2003-05-13

  • Table: 97F0021X2001006
    Description:

    This table is part of the "Social and Economic Characteristics of Individuals, Families and Households" topic, which shows 2001 Census data on social and economic characteristics at the family level, including labour force activity of parents with young children, and data on housing costs, including gross rent, owner's major payments, housing affordability and owner's expected selling price.

    This table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Social and Economic Characteristics of Individuals, Families and Households, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F0021XCB2001000.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0021XIE2001006.

    Release date: 2003-05-13

  • Table: 97F0021X2001008
    Description:

    This table is part of the "Social and Economic Characteristics of Individuals, Families and Households" topic, which shows 2001 Census data on social and economic characteristics at the family level, including labour force activity of parents with young children, and data on housing costs, including gross rent, owner's major payments, housing affordability and owner's expected selling price.

    This table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Social and Economic Characteristics of Individuals, Families and Households, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F0021XCB2001000.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0021XIE2001008.

    Release date: 2003-05-13

Analysis (13)

Analysis (13) (13 of 13 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036619
    Description:

    This article examines the characteristics of grandparents in Canada, with a focus on those who share homes with their grandchildren.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200311013102
    Description:

    This article examines the changes to family wealth during the economic boom of 1984 to 1999. In the absence of longitudinal data, changes in family wealth can be estimated using cohorts of 'similar' families from two points in time.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026622
    Description:

    This study examines the time volunteers, friends or relatives devote to unpaid informal care.

    Release date: 2003-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026620
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which never-married and previously married people who have never lived common-law in the past would be willing to do so in the future.

    Release date: 2003-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026634
    Description:

    This article compares the demographic, social and economic situation of couples who are far apart, and those who are close together, in age.

    Release date: 2003-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003207
    Description:

    The estimation of intergenerational earnings mobility is rife with measurement problems since the research does not observe permanent, lifetime earnings. Nearly all studies make corrections for mean variation in earnings because of the age differences among respondents. Recent works employ average earnings or instrumental variable methods to address the effects of measurement error as a result of transitory earnings shocks and mis-reporting. However, empirical studies of intergenerational mobility have paid no attention to the changes in earnings variance across the life cycle suggested by economic models of human capital investment.

    Using information from the Intergenerational Income Data from Canada and the National Longitudinal Survey and Panel Study of Income Dynamics from the United States, this study finds a strong association between age at observation and estimated earnings persistence. Part of this age-dependence is related to a general increase in transitory earnings variance during the collection of data. An independent effect of life cycle investment is also identified. These findings are then applied to the variation among intergenerational earnings persistence studies. Among studies with similar methodologies, one-third of the variance in published estimates of earnings persistence is attributable to cross-study differences in the age of responding fathers. Finally, these results call into question tests for the importance of credit constraints based on measures of earnings at different points in the life cycle.

    Release date: 2003-08-05

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-585-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered "Yes" to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 8,000 children (aged 0 to 14) living in households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the children's component of the survey. Persons living in institutions, on Indian reserves, and in the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut were excluded. The data were collected after the 2001 Census, between September 2001 and January 2002. Note that information on children with disabilities was gathered through interviews with their parents or guardians.

    Using the PALS data, this article describes the lives of children aged 5 to 14 who have disabilities and the impact of their disability on the daily activities and employment situation of their families.

    Specific themes covered are:-help with everyday activities received by children with disabilities;-parents access to formal and informal help;-impacts of the child's disability on the family's employment situation;-children's access to specialized aids and services; and-household income.

    Release date: 2003-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2003002
    Description:

    This study explores how the recent transition to a conjugal union affects time use, the division of labour, perceptions of time and well-being differently for women and men.

    Release date: 2003-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016552
    Description:

    This article looks at 'living apart together' (LAT) relationships where unmarried couples who live in separate residences maintain an intimate relationship.

    Release date: 2003-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016529
    Description:

    This update outlines the major changes that have occurred within families and to their living arrangements over the last 20 years.

    Release date: 2003-06-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 96F0030X
    Description:

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Daily in the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2003-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020046496
    Description:

    This article examines violence committed against senior citizens, using self-reported data from the 1999 General Social Survey.

    Release date: 2003-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020046497
    Description:

    This article examines the percentage of Canadians in owner-occupied homes, the condition and size of their housing, and the proportion of income spent on housing.

    Release date: 2003-03-18

Reference (3)

Reference (3) (3 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2003002
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Conducted in January, February and March after the reference year, data are collected via personal interview using a paper questionnaire. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 2001.) This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share and aggregates).

    Release date: 2003-12-17

  • Index and guides: 92-381-X
    Description:

    This report presents the concepts relating to census families and economic families. It discusses the changes made to the definition of the census family for 2001, and how historical comparability is affected. The report also describes aspects of data collection and processing that could have an impact on the quality of the variable Relationship to Person 1, and how this variable, along with the related demographic variables - sex, age, marital status and common-law status - is processed to ensure consistency and to produce derived variables at the family level.

    Release date: 2003-11-25

  • Index and guides: 92-380-X
    Description:

    This report focuses on five demographic variables: date of birth, age, sex, marital status and common-law status. The report describes how the data were collected, verified, processed, edited and imputed. The final section covers how the data were evaluated.

    Release date: 2003-10-28

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