Statistics by subject – Income, pensions, spending and wealth

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All (63)

All (63) (25 of 63 results)

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

  • Public use microdata: 95M0007X
    Description:

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to unaggregated data. This makes the public use microdata files (PUMFs) powerful research tools. Each file contains anonymous individual responses on a large number of variables. The PUMF user can group and manipulate these variables to suit his/her own data and research requirements. Tabulations not included in other census products can be created or relationships between variables can be analysed by using different statistical tests. PUMFs provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people. All subject-matter covered by the census is included in the microdata files. However, to ensure the anonymity of the respondents, geographic identifiers have been restricted to the provinces/territories and large metropolitan areas. Microdata files have traditionally been disseminated on magnetic tape, which required access to a mainframe computer. For the first time, the 1991 PUMFs will also be available on CD-ROM for microcomputer applications. This file contains data based on a 3% of the population enumerated in the 1991 Census. It provides information on the demographic, social and economic characteristics of the Canadian population. The Individual File allows users to return to the base unit of the census, enabling them to group and manipulate the data to suit their own data and research requirements.

    This product provides two basic tools to assist users in accessing and using the 1991 Census Public Use Microdata File - Individuals CD-ROM.

    Release date: 1995-04-11

  • Public use microdata: 95M0008X
    Description:

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to unaggregated data. This makes the public use microdata files (PUMFs) powerful research tools. Each file contains anonymous individual responses on a large number of variables. The PUMF user can group and manipulate these variables to suit his/her own data and research requirements. Tabulations not included in other census products can be created or relationships between variables can be analysed by using different statistical tests. PUMFs provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people. All subject-matter covered by the census is included in the microdata files. However, to ensure the anonymity of the respondents, geographic identifiers have been restricted to the provinces/territories and large metropolitan areas. Microdata files have traditionally been disseminated on magnetic tape, which required access to a mainframe computer. For the first time, the 1991 PUMFs will also be available on CD-ROM for microcomputer applications. This file contains data based on a 3% of the population enumerated in the 1991 Census. It provides information on the demographic, social and economic characteristics of the Canadian population. The Households and Housing File allows users to return to the base unit of the census, enabling them to group and manipulate the data to suit their own data and research requirements.

    This product provides two basic tools to assist users in accessing and using the 1991 Census Public Use Microdata File - Households and Housing CD-ROM.

    Release date: 1995-03-31

Analysis (8)

Analysis (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950042456
    Description:

    This article provides previously unavailable information on RRSPs by tracking taxfilers' RRSP participation over a three-year period. It shows who contributed regularly, sporadically or not at all, and explores the extent to which individuals used their RRSP room.

    Release date: 1995-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950042458
    Description:

    During the first half of the century, men generally worked until at least age 65. In the past four decades, however, an increasing proportion have been leaving the workforce before the traditional retirement age. How are these men doing financially?

    Release date: 1995-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950042454
    Description:

    Using the new Revenue Canada RRSP room file, this study shows how current tax-assistance rules apply to members of different plans, how levels of tax-assisted savings can vary widely and how these savings are integrated. It also notes the number of persons falling into the various tax-assistance categories.

    Release date: 1995-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950042455
    Description:

    Current projections estimate that almost a quarter of the population will be 65 years or older by 2031. Ensuring that this group will have an adequate income has become an important concern. A look at the programs that now exist to help Canadians save for retirement, as well as who participates in them and how much is being saved.

    Release date: 1995-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995082
    Description:

    Our aim in this paper is to resolve a paradox. Since the 1970s, there has been a downward secular trend in the average real and relative earnings of young adults under the age of 35. Despite the fact that most young children live in households headed by adults under 35, there has been no corresponding secular rise in the incidence of low income among children. Rather child poverty has followed the usual fluctuations of the business cycle.

    We show that the relative stability in child poverty rates in the face of declining labour market earnings is a result of two factors. First, the decline in market income in young households with children has been offset by rising transfers. Since the 1970s, social transfers have replaced earnings as the main source of income among low income families with children.

    Second, changes in the fertility behaviour and labour market characteristics of young adults have sharply reduced the risk of young children growing up in low income households. Today's young parents are better educated, working more hours, having fewer children, and postponing child-birth until later ages when earnings are higher. Although more children do find themselves in single parent families, this change has been swamped by other changes in family patterns and labour market behaviour that have reduced the risk of child poverty.

    Thus, the upward pressure on low income among children stemming from the labour market has been offset by social transfers, on the one hand, and by changes in family formation and the labour market behaviour of young adults, on the other. Except for cyclical variations, the result has been relative stability in the incidence of low income among children over the 1980s and early 1990s. Whether these offsetting patterns will continue in the last half of the 1990s remains to be seen.

    Release date: 1995-09-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950021599
    Description:

    A focus not on the pension plans themselves, but on the members: how their pension accruals can be vastly different, how many earn relatively generous benefits and how many have much lower pension savings.

    Release date: 1995-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950021592
    Description:

    A description of the volume of paid work done in 1992 by low income families headed by a person under 65, comparing the number of weeks worked by these families with the number of weeks worked by other families.

    Release date: 1995-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950011779
    Description:

    A look at the 1993 growth in the number of RRSP contributors and the amounts invested in this tax-assisted retirement savings program.

    Release date: 1995-03-08

Reference (53)

Reference (53) (25 of 53 results)

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