Statistics by subject – Income, pensions, spending and wealth

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All (9)

All (9) (9 of 9 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960042921
    Description:

    Despite improved economic conditions in recent years, Canadians have continued to cash in their RRSPs. This article looks at RRSP withdrawals during the 1990s, including those made through the Home Buyers' Plan. Who made these withdrawals, and for what reasons, and how will such behaviour affect immediate tax obligations and future retirement savings?

    Release date: 1996-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960042922
    Description:

    From 1990 to 1994, rolloves of retiring allowances and pension benefits represented about 20% of all RRSP deposits. This article shows how great these rollover contributions were, who benefited and who will be most affected by recent legislative changes.

    Release date: 1996-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960032899
    Description:

    A look at trends in transfer payments to families from 1980 to 1994. How have these transfers responded to changes in business cycles and how effective have they been in raising two-parent and lone-parent families above the low income cut-offs?

    Release date: 1996-09-03

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960022888
    Description:

    This article challenges the notion that defined benefit registered pension plans have been abandoned in great numbers. It also examines why this perception has arisen and to what extent recent conversions to group RRSPs have contributed to this idea.

    Release date: 1996-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960022890
    Description:

    Contrary to popular belief, the average earnings of men working full year full time seem to decline prior to retirement. This study explores several possible explanations for the unexpected pattern.

    Release date: 1996-06-05

  • Table: 10F0008X
    Description:

    Two sets of profiles are available; the first (2A) presents the basic data collected from all Canadian households; the second (2B) presents the detailed socio-economic data collected from a 20% sample of households.

    Release date: 1996-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1996090
    Description:

    This paper outlines the structure of payroll taxes and documents evidence on the level, growth and role of each component over the last three decades for Canada and for each province. Levied by both the federal and provincial governments, payroll taxes in Canada include four major components: i) unemployment insurance (UI) premiums; ii) Canada/Quebec Pension Plan (C/QPP) contributions; iii) workers compensation (WC) premiums; and iv) the provincial health/post-secondary education (H/E) tax levied by Quebec, Manitoba, Ontario and Newfoundland. While the UI and C/QPP components are levied on both employers and employees, the WC and H/E components are levied on employers only. Our main findings are 1) payroll taxes have increased substantially over the last three decades in Canada as a whole and in every province; 2) the structure, level, growth and role of each component of payroll taxes vary remarkably from one province to another; 3) the expansion of the UI component in recent years has been the largest contributor to the rise in payroll taxes across every province in the country; and 4) despite significant growth in recent years, payroll taxes are still much lower in Canada than in most other western industrialized countries.

    Release date: 1996-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1996089
    Description:

    In this paper we use administrative data associated with the tax system to: (1) document the extent of intergenerational income mobility among Canadian men; and (2) estimate the income disadvantage (in adulthood) of being raised in a low income household. We find that there is considerable intergenerational income mobility in Canada among middle income earners, but that the inheritance of economic status is significant at both the very top and very bottom of the income distribution. About one-third of those in the bottom quartile were raised by fathers who occupied the same position in the income distribution. In fact, the income advantage of someone who had a father in the top decile over someone who had a father in the bottom decile is in the order of 40%. We also discuss some of the policy implications of these findings, as well as some of their limitations and the directions implied for future research.

    Release date: 1996-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19950009311
    Description:

    The 1990 report compared the situation of the Canadian population with that of the United States, Canada's historical partner in the settlement of North America, showing their similarities and differences and how each has developed over time. Continuing in the same vein, the 1993 report described the Mexican situation in comparison with the population of Canada. It seemed worthwhile to consider why and how Canada's two most densely populated provinces, Quebec and Ontario, are alike and differ.

    Release date: 1996-01-19

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 10F0008X
    Description:

    Two sets of profiles are available; the first (2A) presents the basic data collected from all Canadian households; the second (2B) presents the detailed socio-economic data collected from a 20% sample of households.

    Release date: 1996-04-01

Analysis (8)

Analysis (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960042921
    Description:

    Despite improved economic conditions in recent years, Canadians have continued to cash in their RRSPs. This article looks at RRSP withdrawals during the 1990s, including those made through the Home Buyers' Plan. Who made these withdrawals, and for what reasons, and how will such behaviour affect immediate tax obligations and future retirement savings?

    Release date: 1996-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960042922
    Description:

    From 1990 to 1994, rolloves of retiring allowances and pension benefits represented about 20% of all RRSP deposits. This article shows how great these rollover contributions were, who benefited and who will be most affected by recent legislative changes.

    Release date: 1996-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960032899
    Description:

    A look at trends in transfer payments to families from 1980 to 1994. How have these transfers responded to changes in business cycles and how effective have they been in raising two-parent and lone-parent families above the low income cut-offs?

    Release date: 1996-09-03

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960022888
    Description:

    This article challenges the notion that defined benefit registered pension plans have been abandoned in great numbers. It also examines why this perception has arisen and to what extent recent conversions to group RRSPs have contributed to this idea.

    Release date: 1996-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960022890
    Description:

    Contrary to popular belief, the average earnings of men working full year full time seem to decline prior to retirement. This study explores several possible explanations for the unexpected pattern.

    Release date: 1996-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1996090
    Description:

    This paper outlines the structure of payroll taxes and documents evidence on the level, growth and role of each component over the last three decades for Canada and for each province. Levied by both the federal and provincial governments, payroll taxes in Canada include four major components: i) unemployment insurance (UI) premiums; ii) Canada/Quebec Pension Plan (C/QPP) contributions; iii) workers compensation (WC) premiums; and iv) the provincial health/post-secondary education (H/E) tax levied by Quebec, Manitoba, Ontario and Newfoundland. While the UI and C/QPP components are levied on both employers and employees, the WC and H/E components are levied on employers only. Our main findings are 1) payroll taxes have increased substantially over the last three decades in Canada as a whole and in every province; 2) the structure, level, growth and role of each component of payroll taxes vary remarkably from one province to another; 3) the expansion of the UI component in recent years has been the largest contributor to the rise in payroll taxes across every province in the country; and 4) despite significant growth in recent years, payroll taxes are still much lower in Canada than in most other western industrialized countries.

    Release date: 1996-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1996089
    Description:

    In this paper we use administrative data associated with the tax system to: (1) document the extent of intergenerational income mobility among Canadian men; and (2) estimate the income disadvantage (in adulthood) of being raised in a low income household. We find that there is considerable intergenerational income mobility in Canada among middle income earners, but that the inheritance of economic status is significant at both the very top and very bottom of the income distribution. About one-third of those in the bottom quartile were raised by fathers who occupied the same position in the income distribution. In fact, the income advantage of someone who had a father in the top decile over someone who had a father in the bottom decile is in the order of 40%. We also discuss some of the policy implications of these findings, as well as some of their limitations and the directions implied for future research.

    Release date: 1996-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19950009311
    Description:

    The 1990 report compared the situation of the Canadian population with that of the United States, Canada's historical partner in the settlement of North America, showing their similarities and differences and how each has developed over time. Continuing in the same vein, the 1993 report described the Mexican situation in comparison with the population of Canada. It seemed worthwhile to consider why and how Canada's two most densely populated provinces, Quebec and Ontario, are alike and differ.

    Release date: 1996-01-19

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Reference (0) (0 results)

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