Statistics by subject – Income, pensions, spending and wealth

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Data (33)

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Analysis (25)

Analysis (25) (25 of 25 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2003007
    Description:

    Consumers buy more in December than in any other month of the year. Consumers rush to get gifts for the Christmas season while retailers rely on this period to register a high proportion of their yearly sales. The most popular stores at Christmas time are jewellery, music, toy, book, clothing, and general merchandise stores. This article examines monthly and quarterly retail sales to show the importance of Christmas for consumers and retailers.

    Release date: 2003-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200311013102
    Description:

    This article examines the changes to family wealth during the economic boom of 1984 to 1999. In the absence of longitudinal data, changes in family wealth can be estimated using cohorts of 'similar' families from two points in time.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200311113103
    Description:

    This paper looks at income and wealth as important indicators of financial well-being for seniors. It also examines their debts and preparedness for unexpected expenses.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2003010
    Description:

    This paper presents data for children aged 0 to 18 years on three important elements of educational planning related to postsecondary education: a home context that promotes and supports postsecondary education, children's academic abilities and perceptions of school, and saving and financial planning for postsecondary education. It uses data collected by the Survey of Approaches to Educational Planning (SAEP), 2002.

    Release date: 2003-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003197
    Description:

    The economic assimilation of immigrants is a key concern for economists and policy makers. The topic has been widely explored in terms of earnings assimilation of immigrants. Using the 1999 Survey of Financial Security, this study attempts to look at the issue from the wealth perspective.

    Among married families, immigrants have higher wealth than their native-born counterparts from the 40th to 90th percentiles of the distribution, with the wealth gap ranging between $20,000 and $78,000. Among single families, immigrants have higher wealth from the 55th to 95th percentiles, with the wealth gap ranging between $14,000 and $145,000. At the bottom of the distribution, however, evidence suggests that immigrants have lower wealth, although the gap is generally below $10,000. Various decomposition results indicate that the age of the major income recipient (and of the spouse for married families) as well as factors affecting permanent income explain a significant portion of the wealth gap in cases where immigrant families have higher wealth than the native-born. At the bottom of the wealth distribution, however, the wealth gap cannot be explained by the age of the major income recipient, permanent income factors, or family size (or lone-parent status), suggesting that low-wealth immigrant families may behave differently than low-wealth Canadian-born families in their wealth accumulation process.

    The wealth gap is also studied from a cohort perspective. Not surprisingly, recent immigrants have lower wealth than comparable Canadian-born families, and immigrants who arrived before 1976 have higher wealth. While immigrants who arrived in Canada between 1976 and 1985 are widely believed to initially have had more of an earnings disadvantage than their predecessors with respect to the Canadian-born, this study finds that, over the upper segment of the distribution, the wealth of this cohort is not significantly different from that of comparable Canadian-born families. But over the lower portion of the distribution, the cohort has lower wealth.

    Release date: 2003-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M20030436694
    Description:

    This document contains historical analysis of the provincial and territorial economies from 1981 to 2002. It looks at their structural changes from the perspectives of the evolution of industries and the different components of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

    Release date: 2003-11-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003215
    Description:

    Using census data covering the 1980 to 2000 period, we examine what outcomes would be necessary for cohorts of recent immigrants to achieve earnings parity with Canadian-born workers. Our results show that today's recent immigrants would have to experience a drastic rise of their relative age-earnings profile in the near future for their earnings to converge with their Canadian-born counterparts. The reason is simple: the greater relative earnings growth experienced by cohorts of recent immigrants has only partially offset the drastic deterioration in their relative earnings at entry.

    Release date: 2003-10-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003210
    Description:

    The relationship between family income and postsecondary participation is studied in order to determine the extent to which higher education in Canada has increasingly become the domain of students from well-to-do families. An analysis of two separate data sets suggests that individuals from higher income families are much more likely to attend university, but this has been a long-standing tendency and the participation gap between students from the highest and lowest income families has in fact narrowed. The relationship between family income and postsecondary participation did become stronger during the early to mid 1990s, but weakened thereafter. This pattern reflects the fact that policy changes increasing the maximum amount of a student loan as well as increases in other forms of support occurred only after tuition fees had already started increasing.

    Release date: 2003-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310713094
    Description:

    This paper examines the burden of property tax by province and household income and how property tax increases the inequality of family income.

    Release date: 2003-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026633
    Description:

    This article looks at the early employment experiences of three groups of working age immigrants: those who arrived in 1981, in 1991 and in 1996.

    Release date: 2003-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310813097
    Description:

    This paper examines the factors that influence the decision to hire domestic help.

    Release date: 2003-08-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003198
    Description:

    This study uses census data to focus on low-income among immigrants, and asks a number of questions: (1) have low-income rates increased among successive cohorts of entering immigrants, both in absolute terms and relative to the Canadian born (they have), (2) is this increase due to changes in their characteristics (e.g. education, age, source country, language etc.), (3) do low-income rates fall as new immigrants acquire Canadian experience, and are there signs that low-income rates fall faster among the more recent entering cohorts with the higher entry level rates, resulting in some "catch-up", and (4) in the major Canadian cities, to what extent was the deterioration in the city level low-income rates during the 1990s concentrated among immigrants? The analysis covers the period from 1980 to 2000, and focuses on change between 1980 to 1990, and 1990 to 2000, years that are roughly at business cycle peaks.

    Basically, low-income rates have been falling over the past two decades among the Canadian born, and rising among immigrants. A discussion of the possible determinants of the trends mentioned above is included in the literature review and the conclusion.

    Release date: 2003-06-19

  • Journals and periodicals: 96F0030X
    Description:

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Daily in the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2003-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 96F0030X2001014
    Description:

    This release of the 2001 Census data focuses on the income of Canadian families. The analysis compares median family income in 1980, 1990 and 2000 and examines how the share of family income that comes from government transfers has changed over these two decades. In addition, it provides a detailed description of the distribution of Canadian family income in 2000 and looks at how incomes have changed for families at the high, low, and middle of the income distribution in the past decade. Finally, the report examines low-income among Canada's children and senior population. All of the analyses are done at the national level, but selected variables are examined at the provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels.

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Dailyin the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2003-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20031046508
    Description:

    This product presents the latest facts and figures on gambling in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20030046509
    Description:

    This article studies recent divergence between Canadian and U.S. household, government, business and external spending and saving. It also looks at the implications for lending and borrowing in the two countries.

    Release date: 2003-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002004
    Description:

    This paper applies a broad set of disparity measures to subprovincial income data in Canada. The data used in this research come from income tax returns from 1992 to 1999, for about 280 census divisions covering the entire country. This approach provides an understanding of the spatial structure of income disparity with a high level of geographical resolution, which also highlights the evolution of the rural/urban divide. Since the period of study is short, the results are particularly relevant in understanding the spatial characteristics of the growth that occurred during the 1990s.

    Release date: 2003-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003192
    Description:

    The 1990s were characterized by substantial declines in the number of welfare recipients in most Canadian provinces. These declines occurred in a period when most provincial governments lowered benefits and tightened eligibility rules. What happened to the economic well-being of those who left welfare in the 1990s? Using longitudinal tax data, this study examines the short and long-term outcomes of welfare leavers across three dimensions: earnings, disposable income and low-income. The role of marriage in post-welfare outcomes is also investigated.

    Release date: 2003-03-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310113083
    Description:

    This article takes a brief look at family incomes in 2000 and changes that have occurred since 1980.

    Release date: 2003-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310113082
    Description:

    This paper looks at why people contribute to registered retirement savings plans (RRSPs). It examines personal and family characteristics.

    Release date: 2003-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020046497
    Description:

    This article examines the percentage of Canadians in owner-occupied homes, the condition and size of their housing, and the proportion of income spent on housing.

    Release date: 2003-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2003042
    Description:

    There is a sizable consumer market for entertainment services in Canada. Regardless of economic conditions, most Canadian households will pay for at least one entertainment pursuit during a given year. In 1999, consumer spending on entertainment services totalled $9.7 billion, an amount representing 1% of Canada's GDP.

    This paper compares the spending patterns of Canadians on entertainment services, by province, household income level and household type. The "Entertainment Services" category is constructed using several pre-existing commodity groups from the Survey of Household Spending.

    Release date: 2003-03-14

  • Articles and reports: 96F0030X2001013
    Description:

    This topic presents an analysis of the earnings data collected by the 2001 Census. The text is supplemented by charts and tables, and examines some of the trends in earnings between 1980 and 2000 to illustrate the way in which Canadians are making a living in the new economy.

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Dailyin the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003172
    Description:

    All countries look to economic growth to reduce low-income. This paper focuses on the 1990s and assesses the role played by changes in economic growth, employment earnings and government transfers in the patterns of low-income intensity in Canada during the 1990s. We find that low-income intensity was higher in most provinces during the 1990s than during the 1980s (comparing comparable positions in the business cycle). The largest increase was in Ontario. In particular, in spite of the slow economic growth and falling unemployment between 1993 and 1997, low-income intensity continued to rise. Both increases in the low-income rate and the low-income gaps contributed to this higher level. Employment earnings continued to decline among low-income families over the 1990s, contributing to the increase in low-income intensity in central and eastern Canada in particular. This is related in part to the more severe recession of the early 1990s east of Manitoba, and the lack of recovery among poorer families. During the 1990s changes in government transfers did not offset the fall in employment earnings among lower-income families, as they did during the 1980s, resulting in rising low-income intensity. Declining transfer benefits were associated with a rising low-income gap in some provinces, particularly Alberta. The latest data available at the time of writing was 1998. The strong economic growth of 1999 and 2000 will likely have reduced low-income intensity, but it remains to be seen if it falls back to the level of the 1980s cyclical peak.

    Release date: 2003-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003196
    Description:

    This paper uses the Statistics Canada Survey of Literacy Skills Used in Daily Activities (LSUDA) to investigate minority-white income differences and the role cognitive skills play in those patterns. Some minority groups have substantially lower (tested) levels of literacy and numeracy skills than whites and other more economically successful minorities and, in the case of certain male groups, these differences play a significant role in explaining the observed income patterns. The ethnic-white income gaps are, however, much smaller for women, and the literacy and numeracy variables do not have much of a role to play in explaining those differences. Various policy implications are discussed.

    Release date: 2003-01-24

Reference (13)

Reference (13) (13 of 13 results)

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