Statistics by subject – Business and government Internet use

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  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2014004
    Description:

    This infographic describes some results of the Digital Technology and Internet Use survey of 2012. It measures the use and adoption of various digital technologies, including the Internet. The survey focuses on the use of information and communications technologies, such as personal computers, mobile devices, and the Internet. The survey also provides indicators of e-commerce and the use of websites.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2014001
    Description:

    This infographic describes some results for the Digital Technology and Internet Use survey of 2013. It measures the use and adoption of various digital technologies, including the Internet. The survey focuses on the use of information and communications technologies, including personal computers, mobile devices, and the Internet, using a sample of Canadian enterprises in the private sector. The survey also provides indicators of e-commerce and website use.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-06-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 56F0004M
    Description:

    The Connectedness series publishes analytical studies as well as research reports in the broad area of connectedness. This includes the industrial areas of telecommunications, broadcasting, computer services and Internet Service Providers as well as cross economy activities such as the Internet and electronic commerce. It offers a statistical perspective in these emerging phenomena that are changing the economic and societal landscape of the country.

    All papers are subject to peer and institutional review as well as review by subject matter experts, as necessary.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019625
    Description:

    In 2005, only 6% of Canadian firms sold goods online. Even though 43% of firms made purchases online, it appears that the majority of firms are still having difficulties adapting their business to the online environment or are simply choosing not to do so. In order for Canadian electronic commerce to continue its growth, it is important to identify the barriers and explore what firm characteristics, such as size and sector, may influence these barriers.

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039533
    Description:

    Over the past decade, Internet content has evolved to the point where it now represents a significant source of information and entertainment for many people. The Internet has changed the way that many individuals and organizations gather information, and has undoubtedly had some influence on their use of traditional media. While few Canadians had Internet access and went online to gather news information in the mid-1990's, today many use the Internet to access online newspapers, reports, discussion forums and even blogs. In 2005 for example, about 62% of home Internet users - or 38% of Canadian adults overall - went online to view news or sports information (Statistics Canada 2006).

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039535
    Description:

    Over the past six years, the Government of Canada has worked toward providing services online for corporations, clients and citizens alike. By 2005, the initiative had resulted in 130 of the most commonly used services being available online to complement more traditional means of delivery. This article provides highlights from Statistics Canada's 2005 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) which investigated federal and provincial government online services.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2006014
    Description:

    This paper uses statistical information to begin to shed light on the outcomes and impacts of information and communications technology (ICT). Some of the expected outcomes associated with ICT are presented, while factual evidence is used to demonstrate that these outcomes have so far not materialized. The paperless office is the office that never happened, with consumption of paper at an all-time high and the business of transporting paper thriving. Professional travel has most likely increased during a period when the Internet and videoconferencing technology were taking-off; and, e-commerce sales do not justify recent fears of negative consequences on retail employment and real estate. The paper further demonstrates that some of the key outcomes of ICTs are manifested in changing behavioural patterns, including communication and spending patterns.

    Release date: 2006-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029241
    Description:

    For the first time in 2005, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) collected information on the use and development of open-source software. The use of open-source software is a movement that has attracted significant momentum in recent years as public organizations, private firms and governments alike have explored possible benefits.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2006049
    Description:

    This article looks at how the growing popularity of Internet reservations is affecting Canada's travel arrangement and travel accommodation industries. While few tour operators perceived their growth was dampened by Internet reservations in 2003, nearly two-thirds of travel agencies felt that Internet reservations were detrimental to their business. As Internet-savvy travelers become more comfortable assembling their own travel packages on-line they are increasingly bypassing travel agencies, especially those with no Internet presence.

    The article also suggests that, along with a sharp decline in the number of foreign tourists visiting Canada, the greater prevalence of Internet reservations dampened room prices and operating profits from 2001 to 2003 for traveler accommodations providers, particularly non-affiliated ones.

    Release date: 2006-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 63-018-X20060018804
    Description:

    This article looks at how the growing popularity of Internet reservations is affecting Canada's travel arrangement and travel accommodation industries. While few tour operators perceived their growth was dampened by Internet reservations in 2003, nearly two-thirds of travel agencies felt that Internet reservations were detrimental to their business. As Internet-savvy travelers become more comfortable assembling their own travel packages on-line they are increasingly bypassing travel agencies, especially those with no Internet presence.

    The article also suggests that, along with a sharp decline in the number of foreign tourists visiting Canada, the greater prevalence of Internet reservations dampened room prices and operating profits from 2001 to 2003 for traveler accommodations providers, particularly non-affiliated ones.

    Release date: 2006-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2005033
    Description:

    In 2004, e-commerce sales were $26.5 billion for private firms in Canada. The paper focuses on the strength of business-to-business sales that accounted for 75% of this total. In particular, the trends in three sectors - wholesale trade, manufacturing and retail trade - are examined. Data from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology is used in the analysis.

    Release date: 2005-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510713146
    Description:

    Workers who use computers earn more than those who do not. Is this a productivity effect or merely selection (that is, workers selected to use computers are more productive to begin with). After controlling for selection, the average worker enjoys a wage premium of 3.8% upon adopting a computer. This premium, however, obscures important differences by education and occupation. Long-run returns to computer use are over 5% for most workers. Differences between short-run and long-run returns suggest that workers may share training costs through sacrificed wages.

    Release date: 2005-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005034
    Description:

    This report presents information on the information and communications technologies (ICT) infrastructure and reach in all responding First Nations schools in Canada. It uses data from the 2003/04 Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey.

    Release date: 2005-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005028
    Description:

    This paper examines student-educator ratios and per-capita education expenditures within the context of the presence of a teacher-librarian. The presence of library staff such as teacher-librarians or library technicians is reviewed by province, on a per school and per student basis. In addition, the presence of school libraries in rural and urban schools and public versus private schools is considered.

    Release date: 2005-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030017816
    Description:

    This article examines the use of computers, e-mail and the Internet in the culture sector in industries such as recording production, film and publishing, performing arts and heritage institutions.

    Release date: 2005-04-07

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050017765
    Description:

    The percentage of firms using an extranet in Canada remains low with just over 6% of private firms using an extranet in 2003. Nonetheless, extranets could become an important part of the e-business landscape in Canada. This article examines the functionality of extranets that Canadian firms are currently employing.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2005006
    Description:

    The growth in micro-technologies and their widespread diffusion across economic sectors have given rise to what is often described as a New Economy - an economy in which competitive prospects are closely aligned with the firm's innovation and technology practices, and its use of skilled workers. Training is one strategy that many firms undertake in order to improve the quality of their workforce.

    This study contributes to the expanding body of research in the area of information and communication technologies (ICT). Using data on business sector workplaces from the 1999 Workplace and Employee Survey (WES), we investigate factors related to the incidence and intensity of training. The study focuses on whether training incidence and training intensity are more closely associated with the technological competencies of specific workplaces than with membership in ICT and science-based industry environments. The study finds that training incidence depends more on the technological competencies exhibited by individual workplaces. Among workplaces that decide to train, these technological competencies are also important determinants of the intensity of training.

    Workplaces which score highly on our index of technological competency are over three times more likely to train than those that rank zero on the competency index. The size of the workplace is also a factor. Large and medium-sized workplaces are 3 and 2.3 times more likely to train than small workplaces, respectively. And workplaces with higher-skilled workforces are more likely to train than workplaces with lower-skilled workforces.

    For workplaces that choose to train, their technological competency is the main determinant of training intensity. The size of the workplace, the average cost of training, and the skill level of the workforce are also influential factors'but to a lesser extent. Other factors, such as sector, outside sources of funding, and unionization status, are not influential factors in determining the intensity of training. Workplaces that have a higher average cost of training train fewer employees as a proportion of their workforce. However, the skill level of their employees moderates this effect, because as payroll-per-employee increases (a proxy for worker skills), plants train more.

    Release date: 2005-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2004007
    Description:

    This paper examines the issue of whether investment in information and communication technologies, combined with organizational changes and worker skills, contribute to better performance in Canadian firms.

    Release date: 2004-11-12

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037433
    Description:

    This article examines the possible functions of an intranet and the types of Canadian firms that are using them. Some organizations are uncertain about what purpose an intranet serves and whether they may benefit from using one.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2004016
    Description:

    This paper examines the differences in adoption of information and communication technologies by firms with high-speed Internet connections compared with those with low-speed connections. The paper analyses data from the 2003 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology.

    Release date: 2004-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2004011
    Description:

    This paper provides key indicators of connectedness for Canada's elementary and secondary schools using data from the Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey.

    Release date: 2004-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20040037017
    Description:

    Drawing on data from the 2003-2004 Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey, this article reports on computer and technology access and use in Canadian schools. Information is provided on student-to-computer ratios, technology applications that are available to students, and principals' assessments of the extent to which teachers have the technical skills to use computer technologies for administrative purposes and for effectively incorporating computer technology into teaching practices.

    Release date: 2004-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040026935
    Description:

    This article looks at electronic commerce and technology in 2003.

    Release date: 2004-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2004017
    Description:

    This report presents information on the integration of information and communications technologies (ICT) in elementary and secondary school classrooms. It uses data from the 2003 Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey.

    Release date: 2004-06-10

Reference (13)

Reference (13) (13 of 13 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4225
    Release date: 2014-06-11

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2009004
    Description:

    This paper provides an analysis of technological change within the Canadian economy based on data from the 2006 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology where firms indicated how they introduced significantly improved technologies. The paper explores differences in the use of methods of introduction of significantly improved technologies by firm/organization size and by industry in both the private and public sectors.

    The paper begins with a brief presentation of previous work carried out on technology introduction. The methodology is described. A description of concepts used in the analysis will follow. Analytic results examining technological change in the private sector overall, by industry and by size, and the public sector overall, by industry and by size are presented. A comparison of technological change in the private and public sectors follows. The paper concludes with a discussion of analytic results and further analytic work that could be undertaken.

    Release date: 2009-11-19

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71-585-X
    Description:

    This compendium provides data from the new Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) conducted by Statistics Canada with the support of Human Resources Development Canada. The survey consists of two components: (1) a workplace survey on the adoption of technologies, organizational change, training and other human resource practices, business strategies, and labour turnover in workplaces; and (2) a survey of employees within these same workplaces covering wages, hours of work, job type, human capital, use of technologies and training. The result is a rich new source of linked information on workplaces and their employees.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20050008660
    Description:

    Electronic commerce in Canada has grown from $5.7 billion in 2000 to over $28 billion in 2004. Despite this growth, barriers remain to e-commerce's effective integration into the economy. The authors compare responses to Statistic Canada's Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology for the years 2001 and 2003. This Canada-wide business survey lists ten barriers to e-commerce adoption and asks firms to identify those that apply. The authors identify statistically significant changes over time and show that barriers are changing, but are not consistent across firm size or industry sector. The authors conclude that policies aimed at encouraging e-commerce adoption must be specific to both firm size and industry sector.

    Release date: 2005-10-20

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20050008658
    Description:

    The vast majority of Internet service providers (ISPs) in Canada are small- and medium-sized companies striving to compete with large and more dominant telecommunication and cable companies.

    Based on data from Statistics Canada's Annual Survey of Internet Service Providers and Related Services for 2000 and 2002, this article compares the performance and characteristics of fast-growing small- and mid-sized Canadian ISPs with those of their slower-growing counterparts. The study also examines the different strategies employed by the two groups as well as their differing perceptions of potential impediments to their growth.

    The main findings relate to the effects of the two groups' business strategies on their core business and diversification, revenues and expenses, broadband and narrowband services, subscriber base and customer retention rates, connection options and growth impediments.

    Release date: 2005-10-20

  • Index and guides: 96-328-M2004027
    Description:

    This activity looks at the different ways in which technology is used on the farm.

    Release date: 2005-01-28

  • Index and guides: 96-328-M2004028
    Description:

    This lesson focuses on computer use on farms. As in other parts of society, computers are a part of farmers' lives. Computers provide much-needed information on farms and facilitate activities such as banking, marketing, communications and research.

    Release date: 2005-01-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004010
    Description:

    This paper analyses data from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology 2002 that looks at the acquisition of significantly improved technologies and the introduction of new or significantly improved products to the market. The target groups are technological innovators (firms that acquired new technologies and/or sold new products), and non-innovators (firms that neither acquired new technologies nor sold new products). A series of profiles is presented of information communication technology (ICT) use as well as barriers to its use for technological innovators and non-innovators.

    Release date: 2004-05-21

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004001
    Description:

    Technological changes are occurring at home, work and play. In the workplace, change occurs in how business is conducted, its production processes and office procedures and much of this change is related to the introduction of new or significantly improved technologies. This paper is based on information from the 2002 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) (see the Appendix) and concentrates on the acquisition of significantly improved technologies in the private sector. The private sector and its two major subsectors, the goods producing and services producing sectors, are presented by employment-size groups. The technological change rates by major sector are also provided.

    Technological change in the workplace includes the seemingly simple purchases of off-the-shelf technologies such as accounting software; colour printers with double-sided printing and facsimile capabilities; and sophisticated medical diagnostic machines and equipment. Acquisition of new or significantly improved technologies is not limited to purchases, but also includes leasing and licensing as well as customizing and developing technologies. Another technology acquisition method, which could incorporate all of the other technology acquisition methods, is 'putting into place an improved production facility' by, for example, retro-fitting pulp and paper mills. At the turn of the new century, the Canadian private sector is not resisting the lure of change - 4 out of 10 private sector firms introduced technological change from 2000 to 2002.

    Release date: 2004-01-19

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2003065
    Description:

    This paper investigates the key characteristics of the farm operators and farm businesses that influence computer use.

    Release date: 2003-12-17

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003002
    Description:

    Today, businesses and individuals are more frequently using electronic networks to obtain information; but are they also using these networks to share information or to create business solutions? Individuals can turn to the Internet to check out companies that post annual reports, catalogues and job opportunities. Businesses can post their catalogues, ask for and reply to tenders, offer training, communicate with customers and suppliers, and post job opportunities over electronic networks. Finally, public sector administrations have entered heavily into electronic information sharing under such initiatives as Government On-Line.

    The Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology captured how, in 2001, businesses used the Internet, intranets, extranets or electronic data interchanges (EDIs) to make information available within their organizations, to their suppliers or customers, or accessible to other organizations. Businesses were asked the types of information, or interactive or network-based activities they made available via electronic networks. Information included product descriptions or catalogues, order status, demand projections, inventory data, customer information and job opportunities. The one interactive or network-based activity captured was electronic training. The information flows captured by this question provide a better understanding of how e-business, in particular electronic customer and supplier relationships, is operating in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-03-03

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2000004
    Description:

    Businesses have embraced the use of information and communications technologies such as e-mail, and the Internet and the personal computer or PC are widely used in most businesses. Use of computers among enterprises was high at 81.9%. The Internet, originally designed as a communications medium for researchers, is now being adopted by many other groups. The Internet was used by 52.8% of enterprises and these enterprises accounted for three-quarters of economic activity.

    The proportion of enterprises with Web sites was 21.7% and these enterprises account for 44.8% of economic activity for the private sector. Among other uses, the Internet was used to purchase goods and services by 13.8% of enterprises and by 10.1% to sell goods and services. Significant variation exists in the levels of information and communications technologies use across industries.

    The public sector is a model user of information and communications technologies. The proportion of institutions in public health, education, and federal and provincial governments using the Internet and e-mail, and having Internet Web sites is significantly higher than it is for the private sector. Over 95 % of institutions in the public sector use the Internet, 96.6% use e-mail and 69.2% have an Internet Web site.

    The volume of Internet-based sales reported was $4.4 billion, of which $4.2 billion was for the private sector and $200 million for the public sector. Total private sector Internet based sales accounted for 0.2% of economic activity in terms of total operating revenue.

    For non-Internet users the most important reason for not using the Internet to purchase or sell goods or services was the belief that their goods or services do not lend themselves to concluding transactions over the Internet. Among Internet users, the most popular reason given for not using the Internet to purchase or sell was that they prefer to maintain their current business model.

    Release date: 2000-11-10

  • Technical products: 88F0006X1999006
    Description:

    This study provides background information towards developing working definitions of e-commerce. In addition, through selected case studies it examines whether respondents could provide information for such measurements. The study distinguishes between e-commerce and e-business, the former being a sub-set of the latter and emphasizes computer-mediation as an important feature of this phenomenon. A definition of e-commerce is then proposed: "Transactions carried over computer-mediated channels that comprise the transfer of ownership or the entitlement to use tangible or intangible assets".

    Release date: 1999-08-20

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