Statistics by subject – Information and communications technology sector

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  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-01-13

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-02-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014089
    Description:

    This paper examines two aspects of productivity growth in Canada's broadcasting and telecommunications industry. The first is the extent to which aggregate MFP growth in the sector came from scale economies as opposed to technical progress. The second is the extent to which aggregate labour productivity growth and MFP growth came from within-firm growth, and from the effect of reallocation due to firm entry and exit and within incumbents' the dynamic forces associated with competitive change.

    Release date: 2014-02-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 56F0004M
    Description:

    The Connectedness series publishes analytical studies as well as research reports in the broad area of connectedness. This includes the industrial areas of telecommunications, broadcasting, computer services and Internet Service Providers as well as cross economy activities such as the Internet and electronic commerce. It offers a statistical perspective in these emerging phenomena that are changing the economic and societal landscape of the country.

    All papers are subject to peer and institutional review as well as review by subject matter experts, as necessary.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110597
    Description:

    Internet use is a key hallmark of an information society. Assessing Internet use today goes beyond access to encompass a cluster of behaviours that reflect the individual's ability to participate productively in an information economy. This study compares the pattern of Internet use of Canadians working in the information and communications technology industries with that of other Canadians.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007015
    Description:

    This paper illustrates how the statistical architecture of Canada's System of National Accounts can be utilized to study the size and composition of a specific economic sector. For illustrative purposes, the analysis focuses on the information and communications technology (ICT) sector, and hence, on the set of technology-producing industries and technology outputs most commonly associated with what is often termed the high-technology economy. Using supply and use tables from the input-output accounts, we develop integrated ICT industry and commodity classifications that link domestic technology producers to their principal commodity outputs. We then use these classifications to generate a series of descriptive statistics that examine the size of Canada's high-technology economy along with its underlying composition. In our view, these integrated ICT classifications can be used to develop a richer profile of the high-technology economy than one obtains from examining its industry or commodity dimensions in isolation.

    Release date: 2007-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007302
    Description:

    The high-tech sector was a major driving force behind the Canadian economic recovery of the late 1990s. It is well known that the tide began to turn quite suddenly in 2001 when sector-wide employment and earnings halted this upward trend, despite continued gains in the rest of the economy. As informative as employment and earnings statistics may be, they do not paint a complete picture of the severity of the high-tech meltdown. A decline in employment may result from reduced hiring and natural attrition, as opposed to layoffs, while a decline in earnings among high-tech workers says little about the fortunes of laid-off workers who did not regain employment in the high-tech sector. In this study, I use a unique administrative data source to address both of these gaps in our knowledge of the high-tech meltdown. Specifically, the study explores permanent layoffs in the high-tech sector, as well as earnings losses of laid-off high-tech workers. The findings suggest that the high-tech meltdown resulted in a sudden and dramatic increase in the probability of experiencing a permanent layoff, which more than quadrupled in the manufacturing sector from 2000 to 2001. Ottawa-Gatineau workers in the industry were hit particularly hard on this front, as the permanent layoff rate rose by a factor of 11 from 2000 to 2001. Moreover, laid-off manufacturing high-tech workers who found a new job saw a very steep decline in earnings. This decline in earnings was well above the declines registered among any other groups of laid-off workers, including workers who were laid off during the "jobless recovery" of the 1990s. Among laid-off high-tech workers who found a new job, about four out of five did not locate employment in high-tech, and about one out of three moved to another city. In Ottawa-Gatineau, many former high-tech employees found jobs in the federal government. However, about two in five laid-off high-tech workers left the city.

    Release date: 2007-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019621
    Description:

    Advances in science, medical research and information and communications technologies (ICTs) are bringing about significant economic and societal transformations, the full impacts of which are only beginning to emerge. Canada's ICT sector, comprised of both manufacturing and service industries, e industries, is one of several important players in the strategy towards improving the country's innovation performance. In particular, the ICT service industries are leading the way in terms of economic growth and innovative activity.

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039531
    Description:

    Canadian universities and affiliated research hospitals have made great strides in commercializing inventions. Since 1998 Statistics Canada has conducted the Survey of Intellectual Property Commercialization in the Higher Education Sector to track progress in this area. This article highlights some of the changes between 2003 and 2004, as well as presenting the 2004 regional results.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2006049
    Description:

    This article looks at how the growing popularity of Internet reservations is affecting Canada's travel arrangement and travel accommodation industries. While few tour operators perceived their growth was dampened by Internet reservations in 2003, nearly two-thirds of travel agencies felt that Internet reservations were detrimental to their business. As Internet-savvy travelers become more comfortable assembling their own travel packages on-line they are increasingly bypassing travel agencies, especially those with no Internet presence.

    The article also suggests that, along with a sharp decline in the number of foreign tourists visiting Canada, the greater prevalence of Internet reservations dampened room prices and operating profits from 2001 to 2003 for traveler accommodations providers, particularly non-affiliated ones.

    Release date: 2006-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 63-018-X20060018804
    Description:

    This article looks at how the growing popularity of Internet reservations is affecting Canada's travel arrangement and travel accommodation industries. While few tour operators perceived their growth was dampened by Internet reservations in 2003, nearly two-thirds of travel agencies felt that Internet reservations were detrimental to their business. As Internet-savvy travelers become more comfortable assembling their own travel packages on-line they are increasingly bypassing travel agencies, especially those with no Internet presence.

    The article also suggests that, along with a sharp decline in the number of foreign tourists visiting Canada, the greater prevalence of Internet reservations dampened room prices and operating profits from 2001 to 2003 for traveler accommodations providers, particularly non-affiliated ones.

    Release date: 2006-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2005048
    Description:

    This article compares the performance and characteristics of fast-growing small- and mid-sized Canadian Internet service providers (ISPs) with those of their slower-growing counterparts. The study also examines the different strategies employed by the two groups as well as their differing perceptions of potential impediments to their growth.

    The main findings relate to the effects of the two groups' business strategies on their core business and diversification, revenues and expenses, broadband and narrowband services, subscriber base and customer retention rates, connection options and growth impediments.

    Release date: 2005-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005035
    Description:

    This study examines the impact of information and communication technologies (ICT) and of foreign outsourcing on the demand for skilled workers. One of the defining features of the Canadian economy in the last two decades has been an increasing wage gap between more- and less-skilled workers. Over the same period, there have been dramatic increases in expenditures on information and communication technologies and in purchases of foreign intermediate inputs. Using data for 84 Canadian manufacturing industries over the 1981-1996 period, we find that both ICT and foreign outsourcing are important contributors to the demand for skills.

    Release date: 2005-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050038760
    Description:

    In recent years, the Government of Canada has made substantial new investment in university research with research funding of $4.0 billion in 2003. To commercialize their technologies, Canadian universities and hospitals created 64 spin-off companies in 2003, for a total of 876 created to date. This article highlights some of the changes between 2001 and 2003, as well as presenting the latest regional results.

    Release date: 2005-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 63-018-X20050018435
    Description:

    Examines small-and mid-sized Internet service providers, and probes the differences between faster growing Internet service providers and their slower-growing counterparts between 2000 and 2002.

    Release date: 2005-07-19

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028015
    Description:

    Canada has been a connected nation for many years. The penetration of basic telephone service and of cable services have been and remain amongst the highest in the world. The networks most used by Canadians are the wireline telephone network, the cable television network, the wireless telephone network, the Internet, and the satellite and MDS television networks. This article highlights the amazing speed at which connectivity is evolving.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2005010
    Description:

    This paper tracks the growth and decline of information and communications technology (ICT) industries that were synonymous with the so-called new economy boom of the late-1990s and its subsequent bust period in the early 2000s. The analysis focuses on the question of whether the ICT bust has been accompanied by a structural shift illustrated by less firm turnover. It shows that to date there is little evidence of a structural shift. Entry rates of new establishments within the ICT sector were above those of other sectors within the economy during both the ICT boom and bust. This is evidence that both firms and entrepreneurs continued to see opportunities to develop new products and markets even during a time of retrenchment. The location of the ICT sector also show little evidence of a change.

    Release date: 2005-03-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2005006
    Description:

    The growth in micro-technologies and their widespread diffusion across economic sectors have given rise to what is often described as a New Economy - an economy in which competitive prospects are closely aligned with the firm's innovation and technology practices, and its use of skilled workers. Training is one strategy that many firms undertake in order to improve the quality of their workforce.

    This study contributes to the expanding body of research in the area of information and communication technologies (ICT). Using data on business sector workplaces from the 1999 Workplace and Employee Survey (WES), we investigate factors related to the incidence and intensity of training. The study focuses on whether training incidence and training intensity are more closely associated with the technological competencies of specific workplaces than with membership in ICT and science-based industry environments. The study finds that training incidence depends more on the technological competencies exhibited by individual workplaces. Among workplaces that decide to train, these technological competencies are also important determinants of the intensity of training.

    Workplaces which score highly on our index of technological competency are over three times more likely to train than those that rank zero on the competency index. The size of the workplace is also a factor. Large and medium-sized workplaces are 3 and 2.3 times more likely to train than small workplaces, respectively. And workplaces with higher-skilled workforces are more likely to train than workplaces with lower-skilled workforces.

    For workplaces that choose to train, their technological competency is the main determinant of training intensity. The size of the workplace, the average cost of training, and the skill level of the workforce are also influential factors'but to a lesser extent. Other factors, such as sector, outside sources of funding, and unionization status, are not influential factors in determining the intensity of training. Workplaces that have a higher average cost of training train fewer employees as a proportion of their workforce. However, the skill level of their employees moderates this effect, because as payroll-per-employee increases (a proxy for worker skills), plants train more.

    Release date: 2005-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2004025
    Description:

    Productivity growth in the U.S. economy jumped during the second half of the 1990s, a resurgence that the literature linked to information technology use. This report contributes to this debate in two ways. First, using the most comparable Canadian and U.S. data available, the contributions of information technology to output, capital input, and productivity performance are quantified. Second, the report examines the extent to which information technology-producing and information technology-using industries have contributed to the aggregate multifactor productivity revival.

    Release date: 2004-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040026932
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2003 Survey of Innovation to examine selected service industries.

    Release date: 2004-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040026927
    Description:

    This article looks at the information and communication technology (ICT) industries and reports on technological changes.

    Release date: 2004-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040026929
    Description:

    Many government departments conduct research and development (R&D), patent inventions and license their technologies. Statistics Canada's Federal Science Expenditures and Personnel (FSEP) survey tracks intellectual property (IP) management activities.

    Release date: 2004-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2004005
    Description:

    This study explores the information and communications technology (ICT) industries and science-based industries of Canada's knowledge economy.

    Release date: 2004-05-28

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016800
    Description:

    For five days in December 2003, the city of Geneva, Switzerland was transformed into the largest multicultural information and communication centre in the world. More than 11,000 gathered for the gamut of meetings, workshops, discussions and exhibitions, all of them culminating at a global summit on the topic of the Information Society.

    Information in this age of technology moves faster than it can be processed. We are now living in what many have termed as an 'information society,' where information and communications technologies (ICTs), most notably the Internet, have transformed the way in which we live, learn and work.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016799
    Description:

    The recent explosive demand for cell phones, personal computers and Internet access has propelled the growth of industries producing information and communication technologies (ICT) goods and services. With Quebec and Ontario accounting for over 85% of ICT manufacturing, the 'high-tech meltdown' was damaging to both provinces, dragging down an otherwise growing manufacturing sector in 2001 and chopping the growth in the 2002 recovery. Unlike manufacturing, the production of ICT services in all provinces exhibited robust growth rates from 1997 to 2002, providing a major source of growth to the service sector, as well as to the total gross domestic product (GDP).

    Release date: 2004-03-05

Reference (17)

Reference (17) (17 of 17 results)

  • Technical products: 88-222-X
    Description:

    This annual publication is based on the Survey of Intellectual Property Commercialization in the Higher Education Sector which tracks the progress of innovation in this area.

    The objective of the survey is to assure the availability of pertinent information to monitor science and technology related activities and to support the development of science and technology policy. The topic studied is intellectual property management at universities and affiliated teaching hospitals. The data are used to determine how to maximize the benefits resulting from public sector research. Data users include the federal and provincial governments and university administrators and researchers.

    Release date: 2010-08-23

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2009004
    Description:

    This paper provides an analysis of technological change within the Canadian economy based on data from the 2006 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology where firms indicated how they introduced significantly improved technologies. The paper explores differences in the use of methods of introduction of significantly improved technologies by firm/organization size and by industry in both the private and public sectors.

    The paper begins with a brief presentation of previous work carried out on technology introduction. The methodology is described. A description of concepts used in the analysis will follow. Analytic results examining technological change in the private sector overall, by industry and by size, and the public sector overall, by industry and by size are presented. A comparison of technological change in the private and public sectors follows. The paper concludes with a discussion of analytic results and further analytic work that could be undertaken.

    Release date: 2009-11-19

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2008001
    Description:

    This study compares the characteristics of innovative exporting firms using formal intellectual property (IP) regimes and those using informal intellectual property regimes. Two service industry groups are examined: Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and Selected Professional, Scientific and Technical Services. The data are based on the 2003 Survey of Innovation

    Release date: 2008-02-29

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2007083
    Description:

    This working paper outlines the results of a new study that notes that technology, prices and demography are key forces driving the economy in the nation's rural areas.

    Release date: 2007-02-13

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2006011
    Description:

    Universities and their affiliated research hospitals make an important contribution to innovation in Canada's economy. Besides generating new knowledge and training highly qualified graduates, some of the technology they produce is patented and licensed to companies for incorporation into commercial products. This is the fifth survey of intellectual property commercialization in the higher education sector.

    Release date: 2006-10-04

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005012
    Description:

    This working paper highlights a variety of aspects of innovation in the information and communications technology (ICT) services sector industries including incidence and types of innovation, novelty of innovation, innovation activities, sources of information and collaboration, problems and obstacles to innovation and impacts of innovation.

    Release date: 2005-10-25

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005006
    Description:

    This research workshop part of the foresight function of the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division, was co-sponsored and hosted by the University of Windsor. The workshop placed the performance of commercialisation in the context of recent federal policy and history. It provided an opportunity for people involved in producing intellectual property for commercialisation to tell their stories. Legal experts advised on the problems of managing intellectual property and on how to make academics, and their private sector partners, better informed about intellectual property protection mechanisms. Recommendations on measurements of commercialisation activities are presented in the report.

    Release date: 2005-03-18

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005007
    Description:

    This report summarises an expert meeting hosted by the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division on commercialization. The purpose of the meeting was to identify indicators that could be used in support of evidence-based commercialisation policy, and a conceptual framework to tie them together. The findings were that it was premature to adopt a single conceptual framework and that it was important to measure linkages among public sector actors and between those in the public and private sectors if the activity of commercialization was to be better understood.

    Release date: 2005-03-18

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007457
    Description:

    The Canadian economy is characterized by the size of the service sector. Elsewhere, the research and development (R&D) activity contributes to the growth of the economy. Paradoxically, R&D is sometime considered as an activity performed by the manufacturing sector. This article sheds light on the importance of efforts dedicated to R&D in the business services sector.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 2939
    Release date: 2004-06-07

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004010
    Description:

    This paper analyses data from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology 2002 that looks at the acquisition of significantly improved technologies and the introduction of new or significantly improved products to the market. The target groups are technological innovators (firms that acquired new technologies and/or sold new products), and non-innovators (firms that neither acquired new technologies nor sold new products). A series of profiles is presented of information communication technology (ICT) use as well as barriers to its use for technological innovators and non-innovators.

    Release date: 2004-05-21

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004001
    Description:

    Technological changes are occurring at home, work and play. In the workplace, change occurs in how business is conducted, its production processes and office procedures and much of this change is related to the introduction of new or significantly improved technologies. This paper is based on information from the 2002 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) (see the Appendix) and concentrates on the acquisition of significantly improved technologies in the private sector. The private sector and its two major subsectors, the goods producing and services producing sectors, are presented by employment-size groups. The technological change rates by major sector are also provided.

    Technological change in the workplace includes the seemingly simple purchases of off-the-shelf technologies such as accounting software; colour printers with double-sided printing and facsimile capabilities; and sophisticated medical diagnostic machines and equipment. Acquisition of new or significantly improved technologies is not limited to purchases, but also includes leasing and licensing as well as customizing and developing technologies. Another technology acquisition method, which could incorporate all of the other technology acquisition methods, is 'putting into place an improved production facility' by, for example, retro-fitting pulp and paper mills. At the turn of the new century, the Canadian private sector is not resisting the lure of change - 4 out of 10 private sector firms introduced technological change from 2000 to 2002.

    Release date: 2004-01-19

  • Technical products: 62-014-X
    Description:

    The growth in the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sector has created a need for more sector-specific economic indicators. Prices Division at Statistics Canada (STC) currently produces price indexes for several ICT goods that include computers and computer equipment or peripherals (e.g., printers and monitors). These indexes measure the price movement of ICT goods at the final or end-purchaser level (i.e., government, businesses and households) for consumption. The ICT price index series are used by economists, industry analysts and the general public to track and comprehend events and trends as they occur in this important area of the ICT sector. Within STC, the series pertaining to consumers are used in the calculation of the Consumer Price Index. In addition, several series are used by the Canadian System of National Accounts in deflating the value of gross investment by government and businesses. This reference document outlines what ICT goods price indexes are produced and their underlying data sources and methodology.

    Release date: 2003-10-30

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002017
    Description:

    This paper is an exploratory study to help us identify and characterize innovation practices in Canada's dynamic service industries. It uses logistical estimates to demonstrate that innovation in the services sector is not homogeneous. For each type of innovation 'product, process or both. there is a different business strategy. Small firms do more product innovation, and clients, along with fairs and exhibitions, appear to be the primary sources of information.

    Product innovation is generally done by technical services industries. Process innovation does not seem to favour any particular sector but, understandably, the factors that have the most impact on this type of innovation are company flexibility and information from patent literature, consulting firms and internal management. The most complex strategy-for both product and process innovation-is associated with large firms in the communications and finance sub-sectors. This type of innovation has a larger number of significant factors than the other two types. Finally, this paper shows that there are differences among the forms of innovation and that these differences apply within individual sub-sectors.

    Release date: 2003-01-15

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002016
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation 1999 was conducted in the fall of 1999. It surveyed the manufacturing field and was the first innovation survey of selected natural resource industries.

    This is part of a series of working papers based on the Survey of Innovation 1999. Previous working papers include an examination of national estimates of innovation in manufacturing and statistical tables of provincial estimates of innovation in manufacturing.

    This document includes a description of survey methodology, as well as statistical tables for manufacturing industries at the national level for all non write-in questions from the Survey of Innovation 1999 questionnaire.

    Tables present survey results on the following subjects: competitive environment; firm success factors; percentage of innovative firms; unsuccessful or not yet completed innovation projects; activities linked to innovation; sources of information; objectives; problems and obstacles; impact; cooperative and collaborative arrangements; most important innovation; building and construction products; natural resource products; research and development; intellectual property; human resources; andgovernment support programs.

    Release date: 2003-01-13

  • Index and guides: 31-532-G
    Description:

    This practical and informative guide for manufacturers and exporters will assist in navigating through numerous Statistics Canada products and services. In addition, some recent articles and research papers have been highlighted.

    Release date: 2000-07-26

  • Technical products: 88F0006X1999005
    Description:

    The study of the adoption and dissemination of technologies is one of the key components of innovation and technological development. Indeed, it is through the adoption of newer, more advanced, technologies that industries can increase their production capabilities, improve their productivity, and expand their lines of new products and services. Surveys on the adoption of new technologies complement other information collected about R&D and innovation, allow the measurement of and how quickly and in what way industries adapt to technological change.

    This is the fifth Survey of Advanced Technology in the Canadian Manufacturing Sector. Three surveys of advanced manufacturing technologies were conducted in 1987, 1989 and 1993 (which was part of the Survey of Advanced Technology in Canadian Manufacturing), followed by a survey of the use of biotechnology by Canadian industries, conducted in 1997.

    Increasingly, manufacturing industries rely on information technology and telecommunications, computerizing and linking all functions of their production process. This survey puts the emphasis on issues such as the use of communication networks, whether internal (e. g. Local Area Networks) or external (e.g. the Internet).

    Release date: 1999-08-23

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