Statistics by subject – Information and communications technology

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All (193) (25 of 193 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017039
    Description:

    Based on data from the General Social Survey on Canadians’ Safety, this infographic looks at instances of cyberstalking in Canada by region, age, sex and marital status.

    Release date: 2017-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017032
    Description:

    The purpose of the 2016 General Social Survey on Canadians at Work and Home is to explore the lifestyle behaviour of Canadians at work and at home. The section on the use of technology, in the infographic, shows the types of digital devices people own, the frequency of Internet use and the impact technology has on life.

    Release date: 2017-11-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114693
    Description:

    Based on data from the 2014 General Social Survey, this article examines the characteristics associated with being a victim of cyberbullying or cyberstalking within the last five years for the population aged 15 to 29. This article also examines the association between cyberbullying and cyberstalking and various indicators of trust, personal behaviour and mental health.

    Release date: 2016-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2014002
    Description:

    In 2010, the Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. The CIUS consists of a household component that measures home access, and an individual component that measures online behaviours, including the use of e-commerce.

    This infographic describes some results of the Canadian Internet Use and e-Commerce survey of 2010.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2014003
    Description:

    In 2010, the Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. It is a hybrid survey that measures both household Internet access and the individual online behaviours of a selected household member, including the use of e-commerce.

    This infographic describes some results of the Canadian Internet Use and e-Commerce survey of 2012.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2014004
    Description:

    This infographic describes some results of the Digital Technology and Internet Use survey of 2012. It measures the use and adoption of various digital technologies, including the Internet. The survey focuses on the use of information and communications technologies, such as personal computers, mobile devices, and the Internet. The survey also provides indicators of e-commerce and the use of websites.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2014001
    Description:

    This infographic describes some results for the Digital Technology and Internet Use survey of 2013. It measures the use and adoption of various digital technologies, including the Internet. The survey focuses on the use of information and communications technologies, including personal computers, mobile devices, and the Internet, using a sample of Canadian enterprises in the private sector. The survey also provides indicators of e-commerce and website use.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014089
    Description:

    This paper examines two aspects of productivity growth in Canada's broadcasting and telecommunications industry. The first is the extent to which aggregate MFP growth in the sector came from scale economies as opposed to technical progress. The second is the extent to which aggregate labour productivity growth and MFP growth came from within-firm growth, and from the effect of reallocation due to firm entry and exit and within incumbents' the dynamic forces associated with competitive change.

    Release date: 2014-02-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111768
    Description:

    In recent years, older Canadians have increased their Internet usage and are closing the gap with younger Canadians. However, older Canadians do not use the Internet as much for their consumption of cultural products, for example listening to music and watching videos. This study examines the extent to which seniors 65 and over are using the Internet as a source of cultural content, particularly music.

    Release date: 2013-01-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011072
    Description:

    The nature of the competitive process that causes a reallocation of market shares within an industry contributes to aggregate productivity growth. This paper extends our understanding of industry differences in the competitive process by examining firm turnover and productivity growth in various services industries in Canada and situating them relative to retailing and manufacturing, two industries which have been the focus of these studies in the past. Seven industries in the services sector, namely wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, air transportation, truck transportation, broadcasting and telecommunications, business services and financial services, are examined.

    Release date: 2011-08-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111366
    Description:

    Using data from the different cycles of the General Social Survey from 2000 to 2008, this article explores the evolution of the popularity of working at home among employees and the self-employed. In particular, the characteristics of the workers most likely to work at home as well as the various reasons behind this phenomenon are studied. Perceptions about working at home and work-life balance are also discussed.

    Release date: 2010-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900210910
    Description:

    This article looks at how Canadian seniors (those aged 65 and older) use the Internet compared with baby boomers (those aged 45 to 64 - the seniors of tomorrow). It examines the closing gap between Internet use rates of seniors and boomers, and describes differences in the types of online activities, as well as in the intensity of Internet use.

    Release date: 2009-08-06

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200900110816
    Description:

    The adoption and use of information and communications technologies (ICTs) by individuals and businesses in part determines a country's ability to participate successfully in the global information economy. As the Internet is an essential component of ICT infrastructure, its use has become a key hallmark of this participation. In order to situate Internet use both geographically and over time, this study compares 2005 and 2007 Canadian use rates with those of other selected countries, as well as among Canadian provinces.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2008016
    Description:

    The Internet's rapid and profound entry into our lives quite understandably makes people wonder how, both individually and collectively, we have been affected by it. When major shifts in technology use occur, utopian and dystopian views of their impact on society often abound, reflecting their disruptiveness and people's concerns. Given its complex uses, the Internet, both as a technology and as an environment, has had both beneficial and deleterious effects. Above all, though, it has had transformative effects.

    Are Canadians becoming more isolated, more reclusive and less integrated in their communities as they use the Internet? Or, are they becoming more participatory and more integrated in their communities? In addition, do these communities still resemble traditional communities, or are they becoming more like social networks than cohesive groups?

    To address these questions, this article organizes, analyzes and presents existing Canadian evidence. It uses survey results and research amassed by Statistics Canada and the Connected Lives project in Toronto to explore the role of the Internet in social engagement and the opportunities it represents for Canadians to be active citizens. It finds that Internet users are at least as socially engaged as non-users. They have large networks and frequent interactions with friends and family, although they tend to spend somewhat less in-person time and, of course, more time online. An appreciable number of Internet users are civically and politically engaged, using the Internet to find out about opportunities and make contact with others.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110597
    Description:

    Internet use is a key hallmark of an information society. Assessing Internet use today goes beyond access to encompass a cluster of behaviours that reflect the individual's ability to participate productively in an information economy. This study compares the pattern of Internet use of Canadians working in the information and communications technology industries with that of other Canadians.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008018
    Description:

    This paper examines the presence of knowledge spillovers that affect the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It examines whether plants that adopt advanced technologies are more likely to do so when there are other nearby plants that do so within a model of technology adoption.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007015
    Description:

    This paper illustrates how the statistical architecture of Canada's System of National Accounts can be utilized to study the size and composition of a specific economic sector. For illustrative purposes, the analysis focuses on the information and communications technology (ICT) sector, and hence, on the set of technology-producing industries and technology outputs most commonly associated with what is often termed the high-technology economy. Using supply and use tables from the input-output accounts, we develop integrated ICT industry and commodity classifications that link domestic technology producers to their principal commodity outputs. We then use these classifications to generate a series of descriptive statistics that examine the size of Canada's high-technology economy along with its underlying composition. In our view, these integrated ICT classifications can be used to develop a richer profile of the high-technology economy than one obtains from examining its industry or commodity dimensions in isolation.

    Release date: 2007-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2007015
    Description:

    The 2005 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) included a module of questions on the extent and reasons for which Canadians use the Internet to connect with all levels of government - federal, provincial and municipal. This study examines the patterns of use for government online information and services among adult Canadians. A profile of government online users is developed in order to compare them with other Internet users and with non-users on the basis of various socio-demographic and Internet use characteristics. Concerns about Internet privacy and security are examined as potential barriers to the use of government online services. Finally, a multivariate logistic regression model helps to disentangle the various factors influencing the use of the Internet for government online activities.

    Release date: 2007-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200700410375
    Description:

    This article investigates the use of the Internet for education-related reasons based on findings from the 2005 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS). After providing an overview of Internet use in Canada, the article describes selected social, economic and geographic characteristics of those going online for education-related reasons. It then examines specific reasons for going online for education-related purposes, including for distance education, self-directed learning and correspondence courses. Finally, it examines urban and rural differences among those using the Internet for distance education.

    Release date: 2007-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210328
    Description:

    Although small firms were less likely than large firms to identify benefits from conducting business online, there has been growth in the proportion of firms indicating perceived benefits over the past five years in all size categories.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210327
    Description:

    Internet use is an important hallmark for participation in an information society. Although 68% of adult Canadians went online for personal, non-business reasons in 2005, digital inequality persists both geographically and among certain population groups. While much research and policy attention has been aimed at understanding the barriers to Internet use, there were an estimated 850,000 Canadians who had used the Internet at one time but were no longer doing so in 2005. Who are these former users and why have they discontinued their use of the Internet?

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007003
    Description:

    This study investigates factors that influence Internet use with an emphasis on rural areas and small towns.

    Release date: 2007-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007302
    Description:

    The high-tech sector was a major driving force behind the Canadian economic recovery of the late 1990s. It is well known that the tide began to turn quite suddenly in 2001 when sector-wide employment and earnings halted this upward trend, despite continued gains in the rest of the economy. As informative as employment and earnings statistics may be, they do not paint a complete picture of the severity of the high-tech meltdown. A decline in employment may result from reduced hiring and natural attrition, as opposed to layoffs, while a decline in earnings among high-tech workers says little about the fortunes of laid-off workers who did not regain employment in the high-tech sector. In this study, I use a unique administrative data source to address both of these gaps in our knowledge of the high-tech meltdown. Specifically, the study explores permanent layoffs in the high-tech sector, as well as earnings losses of laid-off high-tech workers. The findings suggest that the high-tech meltdown resulted in a sudden and dramatic increase in the probability of experiencing a permanent layoff, which more than quadrupled in the manufacturing sector from 2000 to 2001. Ottawa-Gatineau workers in the industry were hit particularly hard on this front, as the permanent layoff rate rose by a factor of 11 from 2000 to 2001. Moreover, laid-off manufacturing high-tech workers who found a new job saw a very steep decline in earnings. This decline in earnings was well above the declines registered among any other groups of laid-off workers, including workers who were laid off during the "jobless recovery" of the 1990s. Among laid-off high-tech workers who found a new job, about four out of five did not locate employment in high-tech, and about one out of three moved to another city. In Ottawa-Gatineau, many former high-tech employees found jobs in the federal government. However, about two in five laid-off high-tech workers left the city.

    Release date: 2007-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019621
    Description:

    Advances in science, medical research and information and communications technologies (ICTs) are bringing about significant economic and societal transformations, the full impacts of which are only beginning to emerge. Canada's ICT sector, comprised of both manufacturing and service industries, e industries, is one of several important players in the strategy towards improving the country's innovation performance. In particular, the ICT service industries are leading the way in terms of economic growth and innovative activity.

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019624
    Description:

    The Internet has changed the way many Canadians conduct their everyday activities, from viewing weather, news and sports to banking and paying bills. It has also changed the way many shop. In 2005, Canadians placed almost 50 million online orders valued at $7.9 billion. However, many of these orders were made by a relatively small group of people. In fact, Canada's top online spenders represented fewer than 7% of adult Canadians and accounted for three-quarters of total online expenditures to consumers. Who are these Canadians and what are they buying?

    Release date: 2007-05-10

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Analysis (193)

Analysis (193) (25 of 193 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017039
    Description:

    Based on data from the General Social Survey on Canadians’ Safety, this infographic looks at instances of cyberstalking in Canada by region, age, sex and marital status.

    Release date: 2017-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017032
    Description:

    The purpose of the 2016 General Social Survey on Canadians at Work and Home is to explore the lifestyle behaviour of Canadians at work and at home. The section on the use of technology, in the infographic, shows the types of digital devices people own, the frequency of Internet use and the impact technology has on life.

    Release date: 2017-11-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114693
    Description:

    Based on data from the 2014 General Social Survey, this article examines the characteristics associated with being a victim of cyberbullying or cyberstalking within the last five years for the population aged 15 to 29. This article also examines the association between cyberbullying and cyberstalking and various indicators of trust, personal behaviour and mental health.

    Release date: 2016-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2014002
    Description:

    In 2010, the Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. The CIUS consists of a household component that measures home access, and an individual component that measures online behaviours, including the use of e-commerce.

    This infographic describes some results of the Canadian Internet Use and e-Commerce survey of 2010.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2014003
    Description:

    In 2010, the Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. It is a hybrid survey that measures both household Internet access and the individual online behaviours of a selected household member, including the use of e-commerce.

    This infographic describes some results of the Canadian Internet Use and e-Commerce survey of 2012.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2014004
    Description:

    This infographic describes some results of the Digital Technology and Internet Use survey of 2012. It measures the use and adoption of various digital technologies, including the Internet. The survey focuses on the use of information and communications technologies, such as personal computers, mobile devices, and the Internet. The survey also provides indicators of e-commerce and the use of websites.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2014001
    Description:

    This infographic describes some results for the Digital Technology and Internet Use survey of 2013. It measures the use and adoption of various digital technologies, including the Internet. The survey focuses on the use of information and communications technologies, including personal computers, mobile devices, and the Internet, using a sample of Canadian enterprises in the private sector. The survey also provides indicators of e-commerce and website use.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014089
    Description:

    This paper examines two aspects of productivity growth in Canada's broadcasting and telecommunications industry. The first is the extent to which aggregate MFP growth in the sector came from scale economies as opposed to technical progress. The second is the extent to which aggregate labour productivity growth and MFP growth came from within-firm growth, and from the effect of reallocation due to firm entry and exit and within incumbents' the dynamic forces associated with competitive change.

    Release date: 2014-02-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111768
    Description:

    In recent years, older Canadians have increased their Internet usage and are closing the gap with younger Canadians. However, older Canadians do not use the Internet as much for their consumption of cultural products, for example listening to music and watching videos. This study examines the extent to which seniors 65 and over are using the Internet as a source of cultural content, particularly music.

    Release date: 2013-01-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011072
    Description:

    The nature of the competitive process that causes a reallocation of market shares within an industry contributes to aggregate productivity growth. This paper extends our understanding of industry differences in the competitive process by examining firm turnover and productivity growth in various services industries in Canada and situating them relative to retailing and manufacturing, two industries which have been the focus of these studies in the past. Seven industries in the services sector, namely wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, air transportation, truck transportation, broadcasting and telecommunications, business services and financial services, are examined.

    Release date: 2011-08-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111366
    Description:

    Using data from the different cycles of the General Social Survey from 2000 to 2008, this article explores the evolution of the popularity of working at home among employees and the self-employed. In particular, the characteristics of the workers most likely to work at home as well as the various reasons behind this phenomenon are studied. Perceptions about working at home and work-life balance are also discussed.

    Release date: 2010-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900210910
    Description:

    This article looks at how Canadian seniors (those aged 65 and older) use the Internet compared with baby boomers (those aged 45 to 64 - the seniors of tomorrow). It examines the closing gap between Internet use rates of seniors and boomers, and describes differences in the types of online activities, as well as in the intensity of Internet use.

    Release date: 2009-08-06

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200900110816
    Description:

    The adoption and use of information and communications technologies (ICTs) by individuals and businesses in part determines a country's ability to participate successfully in the global information economy. As the Internet is an essential component of ICT infrastructure, its use has become a key hallmark of this participation. In order to situate Internet use both geographically and over time, this study compares 2005 and 2007 Canadian use rates with those of other selected countries, as well as among Canadian provinces.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2008016
    Description:

    The Internet's rapid and profound entry into our lives quite understandably makes people wonder how, both individually and collectively, we have been affected by it. When major shifts in technology use occur, utopian and dystopian views of their impact on society often abound, reflecting their disruptiveness and people's concerns. Given its complex uses, the Internet, both as a technology and as an environment, has had both beneficial and deleterious effects. Above all, though, it has had transformative effects.

    Are Canadians becoming more isolated, more reclusive and less integrated in their communities as they use the Internet? Or, are they becoming more participatory and more integrated in their communities? In addition, do these communities still resemble traditional communities, or are they becoming more like social networks than cohesive groups?

    To address these questions, this article organizes, analyzes and presents existing Canadian evidence. It uses survey results and research amassed by Statistics Canada and the Connected Lives project in Toronto to explore the role of the Internet in social engagement and the opportunities it represents for Canadians to be active citizens. It finds that Internet users are at least as socially engaged as non-users. They have large networks and frequent interactions with friends and family, although they tend to spend somewhat less in-person time and, of course, more time online. An appreciable number of Internet users are civically and politically engaged, using the Internet to find out about opportunities and make contact with others.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110597
    Description:

    Internet use is a key hallmark of an information society. Assessing Internet use today goes beyond access to encompass a cluster of behaviours that reflect the individual's ability to participate productively in an information economy. This study compares the pattern of Internet use of Canadians working in the information and communications technology industries with that of other Canadians.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008018
    Description:

    This paper examines the presence of knowledge spillovers that affect the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It examines whether plants that adopt advanced technologies are more likely to do so when there are other nearby plants that do so within a model of technology adoption.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007015
    Description:

    This paper illustrates how the statistical architecture of Canada's System of National Accounts can be utilized to study the size and composition of a specific economic sector. For illustrative purposes, the analysis focuses on the information and communications technology (ICT) sector, and hence, on the set of technology-producing industries and technology outputs most commonly associated with what is often termed the high-technology economy. Using supply and use tables from the input-output accounts, we develop integrated ICT industry and commodity classifications that link domestic technology producers to their principal commodity outputs. We then use these classifications to generate a series of descriptive statistics that examine the size of Canada's high-technology economy along with its underlying composition. In our view, these integrated ICT classifications can be used to develop a richer profile of the high-technology economy than one obtains from examining its industry or commodity dimensions in isolation.

    Release date: 2007-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2007015
    Description:

    The 2005 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) included a module of questions on the extent and reasons for which Canadians use the Internet to connect with all levels of government - federal, provincial and municipal. This study examines the patterns of use for government online information and services among adult Canadians. A profile of government online users is developed in order to compare them with other Internet users and with non-users on the basis of various socio-demographic and Internet use characteristics. Concerns about Internet privacy and security are examined as potential barriers to the use of government online services. Finally, a multivariate logistic regression model helps to disentangle the various factors influencing the use of the Internet for government online activities.

    Release date: 2007-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200700410375
    Description:

    This article investigates the use of the Internet for education-related reasons based on findings from the 2005 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS). After providing an overview of Internet use in Canada, the article describes selected social, economic and geographic characteristics of those going online for education-related reasons. It then examines specific reasons for going online for education-related purposes, including for distance education, self-directed learning and correspondence courses. Finally, it examines urban and rural differences among those using the Internet for distance education.

    Release date: 2007-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210328
    Description:

    Although small firms were less likely than large firms to identify benefits from conducting business online, there has been growth in the proportion of firms indicating perceived benefits over the past five years in all size categories.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210327
    Description:

    Internet use is an important hallmark for participation in an information society. Although 68% of adult Canadians went online for personal, non-business reasons in 2005, digital inequality persists both geographically and among certain population groups. While much research and policy attention has been aimed at understanding the barriers to Internet use, there were an estimated 850,000 Canadians who had used the Internet at one time but were no longer doing so in 2005. Who are these former users and why have they discontinued their use of the Internet?

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007003
    Description:

    This study investigates factors that influence Internet use with an emphasis on rural areas and small towns.

    Release date: 2007-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007302
    Description:

    The high-tech sector was a major driving force behind the Canadian economic recovery of the late 1990s. It is well known that the tide began to turn quite suddenly in 2001 when sector-wide employment and earnings halted this upward trend, despite continued gains in the rest of the economy. As informative as employment and earnings statistics may be, they do not paint a complete picture of the severity of the high-tech meltdown. A decline in employment may result from reduced hiring and natural attrition, as opposed to layoffs, while a decline in earnings among high-tech workers says little about the fortunes of laid-off workers who did not regain employment in the high-tech sector. In this study, I use a unique administrative data source to address both of these gaps in our knowledge of the high-tech meltdown. Specifically, the study explores permanent layoffs in the high-tech sector, as well as earnings losses of laid-off high-tech workers. The findings suggest that the high-tech meltdown resulted in a sudden and dramatic increase in the probability of experiencing a permanent layoff, which more than quadrupled in the manufacturing sector from 2000 to 2001. Ottawa-Gatineau workers in the industry were hit particularly hard on this front, as the permanent layoff rate rose by a factor of 11 from 2000 to 2001. Moreover, laid-off manufacturing high-tech workers who found a new job saw a very steep decline in earnings. This decline in earnings was well above the declines registered among any other groups of laid-off workers, including workers who were laid off during the "jobless recovery" of the 1990s. Among laid-off high-tech workers who found a new job, about four out of five did not locate employment in high-tech, and about one out of three moved to another city. In Ottawa-Gatineau, many former high-tech employees found jobs in the federal government. However, about two in five laid-off high-tech workers left the city.

    Release date: 2007-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019621
    Description:

    Advances in science, medical research and information and communications technologies (ICTs) are bringing about significant economic and societal transformations, the full impacts of which are only beginning to emerge. Canada's ICT sector, comprised of both manufacturing and service industries, e industries, is one of several important players in the strategy towards improving the country's innovation performance. In particular, the ICT service industries are leading the way in terms of economic growth and innovative activity.

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019624
    Description:

    The Internet has changed the way many Canadians conduct their everyday activities, from viewing weather, news and sports to banking and paying bills. It has also changed the way many shop. In 2005, Canadians placed almost 50 million online orders valued at $7.9 billion. However, many of these orders were made by a relatively small group of people. In fact, Canada's top online spenders represented fewer than 7% of adult Canadians and accounted for three-quarters of total online expenditures to consumers. Who are these Canadians and what are they buying?

    Release date: 2007-05-10

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