Statistics by subject – Information and communications technology

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  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005007
    Description:

    This report summarises an expert meeting hosted by the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division on commercialization. The purpose of the meeting was to identify indicators that could be used in support of evidence-based commercialisation policy, and a conceptual framework to tie them together. The findings were that it was premature to adopt a single conceptual framework and that it was important to measure linkages among public sector actors and between those in the public and private sectors if the activity of commercialization was to be better understood.

    Release date: 2005-03-18

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005006
    Description:

    This research workshop part of the foresight function of the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division, was co-sponsored and hosted by the University of Windsor. The workshop placed the performance of commercialisation in the context of recent federal policy and history. It provided an opportunity for people involved in producing intellectual property for commercialisation to tell their stories. Legal experts advised on the problems of managing intellectual property and on how to make academics, and their private sector partners, better informed about intellectual property protection mechanisms. Recommendations on measurements of commercialisation activities are presented in the report.

    Release date: 2005-03-18

  • Index and guides: 96-328-M2004027
    Description:

    This activity looks at the different ways in which technology is used on the farm.

    Release date: 2005-01-28

  • Index and guides: 96-328-M2004028
    Description:

    This lesson focuses on computer use on farms. As in other parts of society, computers are a part of farmers' lives. Computers provide much-needed information on farms and facilitate activities such as banking, marketing, communications and research.

    Release date: 2005-01-28

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007457
    Description:

    The Canadian economy is characterized by the size of the service sector. Elsewhere, the research and development (R&D) activity contributes to the growth of the economy. Paradoxically, R&D is sometime considered as an activity performed by the manufacturing sector. This article sheds light on the importance of efforts dedicated to R&D in the business services sector.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Index and guides: 56M0002G
    Description:

    This guide is for the Household Internet Use Survey microdata file. The Household Internet Use Survey is being conducted by Statistics Canada on behalf of Industry Canada. The information from this survey will assist the Science and Technology Redesign Project at Statistics Canada to fulfil a three-year contractual agreement between them and the Telecommunications and Policy Branch of Industry Canada. The Household Internet Use Survey is a voluntary survey. It will provide information on the use of computers for communication purposes, and households' access and use of the Internet from home.

    The objective of this survey is to measure the demand for telecommunications services by Canadian households. To assess the demand, we measure the frequency and intensity of use of what is commonly referred to as "the information highway" among other things. This was done by asking questions relating to the accessibility of the Internet to Canadian households both at home, the workplace and a number of other locations. The information collected will be used to update and expand upon previous studies done by Statistics Canada on the topic of the Information Highway.

    Release date: 2004-09-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5051
    Release date: 2004-06-10

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 2939
    Release date: 2004-06-07

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004010
    Description:

    This paper analyses data from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology 2002 that looks at the acquisition of significantly improved technologies and the introduction of new or significantly improved products to the market. The target groups are technological innovators (firms that acquired new technologies and/or sold new products), and non-innovators (firms that neither acquired new technologies nor sold new products). A series of profiles is presented of information communication technology (ICT) use as well as barriers to its use for technological innovators and non-innovators.

    Release date: 2004-05-21

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004001
    Description:

    Technological changes are occurring at home, work and play. In the workplace, change occurs in how business is conducted, its production processes and office procedures and much of this change is related to the introduction of new or significantly improved technologies. This paper is based on information from the 2002 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) (see the Appendix) and concentrates on the acquisition of significantly improved technologies in the private sector. The private sector and its two major subsectors, the goods producing and services producing sectors, are presented by employment-size groups. The technological change rates by major sector are also provided.

    Technological change in the workplace includes the seemingly simple purchases of off-the-shelf technologies such as accounting software; colour printers with double-sided printing and facsimile capabilities; and sophisticated medical diagnostic machines and equipment. Acquisition of new or significantly improved technologies is not limited to purchases, but also includes leasing and licensing as well as customizing and developing technologies. Another technology acquisition method, which could incorporate all of the other technology acquisition methods, is 'putting into place an improved production facility' by, for example, retro-fitting pulp and paper mills. At the turn of the new century, the Canadian private sector is not resisting the lure of change - 4 out of 10 private sector firms introduced technological change from 2000 to 2002.

    Release date: 2004-01-19

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2004066
    Description:

    Recent studies have shown that fewer rural Canadians were using the Internet than urban Canadians, despite new developments in information and communication technologies (ICTs) (Thompson-James 1999, McLaren 2002). The growth of the Internet has been portrayed as an innovative medium for the exchange of information, which could provide new opportunities to rural Canadians. The purpose of this study is to estimate and to analyse the determinants of Internet use by Canadians in order to understand the factors associated with lower Internet use in rural Canada, with specific emphasis on whether 'rurality' acts as an independent factor on Internet use.

    Release date: 2004-01-06

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2003065
    Description:

    This paper investigates the key characteristics of the farm operators and farm businesses that influence computer use.

    Release date: 2003-12-17

  • Technical products: 62-014-X
    Description:

    The growth in the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sector has created a need for more sector-specific economic indicators. Prices Division at Statistics Canada (STC) currently produces price indexes for several ICT goods that include computers and computer equipment or peripherals (e.g., printers and monitors). These indexes measure the price movement of ICT goods at the final or end-purchaser level (i.e., government, businesses and households) for consumption. The ICT price index series are used by economists, industry analysts and the general public to track and comprehend events and trends as they occur in this important area of the ICT sector. Within STC, the series pertaining to consumers are used in the calculation of the Consumer Price Index. In addition, several series are used by the Canadian System of National Accounts in deflating the value of gross investment by government and businesses. This reference document outlines what ICT goods price indexes are produced and their underlying data sources and methodology.

    Release date: 2003-10-30

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003002
    Description:

    Today, businesses and individuals are more frequently using electronic networks to obtain information; but are they also using these networks to share information or to create business solutions? Individuals can turn to the Internet to check out companies that post annual reports, catalogues and job opportunities. Businesses can post their catalogues, ask for and reply to tenders, offer training, communicate with customers and suppliers, and post job opportunities over electronic networks. Finally, public sector administrations have entered heavily into electronic information sharing under such initiatives as Government On-Line.

    The Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology captured how, in 2001, businesses used the Internet, intranets, extranets or electronic data interchanges (EDIs) to make information available within their organizations, to their suppliers or customers, or accessible to other organizations. Businesses were asked the types of information, or interactive or network-based activities they made available via electronic networks. Information included product descriptions or catalogues, order status, demand projections, inventory data, customer information and job opportunities. The one interactive or network-based activity captured was electronic training. The information flows captured by this question provide a better understanding of how e-business, in particular electronic customer and supplier relationships, is operating in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-03-03

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002017
    Description:

    This paper is an exploratory study to help us identify and characterize innovation practices in Canada's dynamic service industries. It uses logistical estimates to demonstrate that innovation in the services sector is not homogeneous. For each type of innovation 'product, process or both. there is a different business strategy. Small firms do more product innovation, and clients, along with fairs and exhibitions, appear to be the primary sources of information.

    Product innovation is generally done by technical services industries. Process innovation does not seem to favour any particular sector but, understandably, the factors that have the most impact on this type of innovation are company flexibility and information from patent literature, consulting firms and internal management. The most complex strategy-for both product and process innovation-is associated with large firms in the communications and finance sub-sectors. This type of innovation has a larger number of significant factors than the other two types. Finally, this paper shows that there are differences among the forms of innovation and that these differences apply within individual sub-sectors.

    Release date: 2003-01-15

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002016
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation 1999 was conducted in the fall of 1999. It surveyed the manufacturing field and was the first innovation survey of selected natural resource industries.

    This is part of a series of working papers based on the Survey of Innovation 1999. Previous working papers include an examination of national estimates of innovation in manufacturing and statistical tables of provincial estimates of innovation in manufacturing.

    This document includes a description of survey methodology, as well as statistical tables for manufacturing industries at the national level for all non write-in questions from the Survey of Innovation 1999 questionnaire.

    Tables present survey results on the following subjects: competitive environment; firm success factors; percentage of innovative firms; unsuccessful or not yet completed innovation projects; activities linked to innovation; sources of information; objectives; problems and obstacles; impact; cooperative and collaborative arrangements; most important innovation; building and construction products; natural resource products; research and development; intellectual property; human resources; andgovernment support programs.

    Release date: 2003-01-13

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2000004
    Description:

    Businesses have embraced the use of information and communications technologies such as e-mail, and the Internet and the personal computer or PC are widely used in most businesses. Use of computers among enterprises was high at 81.9%. The Internet, originally designed as a communications medium for researchers, is now being adopted by many other groups. The Internet was used by 52.8% of enterprises and these enterprises accounted for three-quarters of economic activity.

    The proportion of enterprises with Web sites was 21.7% and these enterprises account for 44.8% of economic activity for the private sector. Among other uses, the Internet was used to purchase goods and services by 13.8% of enterprises and by 10.1% to sell goods and services. Significant variation exists in the levels of information and communications technologies use across industries.

    The public sector is a model user of information and communications technologies. The proportion of institutions in public health, education, and federal and provincial governments using the Internet and e-mail, and having Internet Web sites is significantly higher than it is for the private sector. Over 95 % of institutions in the public sector use the Internet, 96.6% use e-mail and 69.2% have an Internet Web site.

    The volume of Internet-based sales reported was $4.4 billion, of which $4.2 billion was for the private sector and $200 million for the public sector. Total private sector Internet based sales accounted for 0.2% of economic activity in terms of total operating revenue.

    For non-Internet users the most important reason for not using the Internet to purchase or sell goods or services was the belief that their goods or services do not lend themselves to concluding transactions over the Internet. Among Internet users, the most popular reason given for not using the Internet to purchase or sell was that they prefer to maintain their current business model.

    Release date: 2000-11-10

  • Index and guides: 31-532-G
    Description:

    This practical and informative guide for manufacturers and exporters will assist in navigating through numerous Statistics Canada products and services. In addition, some recent articles and research papers have been highlighted.

    Release date: 2000-07-26

  • Technical products: 21-601-M1999040
    Description:

    This paper looks at where Canadians in rural and small town households are using computers and the Internet (home, work, etc.) and what the common usages are (general browsing, e-mail, etc.).

    Release date: 2000-01-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4441
    Release date: 1999-12-09

  • Technical products: 88F0006X1999005
    Description:

    The study of the adoption and dissemination of technologies is one of the key components of innovation and technological development. Indeed, it is through the adoption of newer, more advanced, technologies that industries can increase their production capabilities, improve their productivity, and expand their lines of new products and services. Surveys on the adoption of new technologies complement other information collected about R&D and innovation, allow the measurement of and how quickly and in what way industries adapt to technological change.

    This is the fifth Survey of Advanced Technology in the Canadian Manufacturing Sector. Three surveys of advanced manufacturing technologies were conducted in 1987, 1989 and 1993 (which was part of the Survey of Advanced Technology in Canadian Manufacturing), followed by a survey of the use of biotechnology by Canadian industries, conducted in 1997.

    Increasingly, manufacturing industries rely on information technology and telecommunications, computerizing and linking all functions of their production process. This survey puts the emphasis on issues such as the use of communication networks, whether internal (e. g. Local Area Networks) or external (e.g. the Internet).

    Release date: 1999-08-23

  • Technical products: 88F0006X1999006
    Description:

    This study provides background information towards developing working definitions of e-commerce. In addition, through selected case studies it examines whether respondents could provide information for such measurements. The study distinguishes between e-commerce and e-business, the former being a sub-set of the latter and emphasizes computer-mediation as an important feature of this phenomenon. A definition of e-commerce is then proposed: "Transactions carried over computer-mediated channels that comprise the transfer of ownership or the entitlement to use tangible or intangible assets".

    Release date: 1999-08-20

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4424
    Release date: 1996-08-26

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