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All (2)

All (2) (2 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995075
    Description:

    This study examines technology use in Canada's manufacturing sector, and how a set of technology-using manufacturing establishments performed relative to non-users. Data originates from a recent Statistics Canada survey, asking manufacturing firms about their use of 22 advanced manufacturing technologies, and panel data taken from the Census of Manufacturers.

    Results show that the use of advanced manufacturing technology is widespread, especially in large firms, that multiple-technology use is the norm, and that technologies are generally combined within, as opposed to across, production stages. The technology revolution has been felt more in the area of inspection and communications, and less in fabrication and assembly. In terms of performance, technology-using establishments pay higher wages, enjoy higher labour productivity, and are gaining market share at the expense of non-users.

    Release date: 1995-08-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995067
    Description:

    The role of technical innovation in economic growth is both a current matter of keen public policy interest, and active exploration in economic theory. However, formal economic theorizing is often constrained by considerations of mathematical tractability. Evolutionary economic theories which are realized as computerized microsimulation models offer significant promise both for transcending mathematical constraints and addressing fundamental questions in a more realistic and flexible manner. This paper sketches XEcon, a microsimulation model of economic growth in the evolutionary tradition.

    Release date: 1995-06-30

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  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995075
    Description:

    This study examines technology use in Canada's manufacturing sector, and how a set of technology-using manufacturing establishments performed relative to non-users. Data originates from a recent Statistics Canada survey, asking manufacturing firms about their use of 22 advanced manufacturing technologies, and panel data taken from the Census of Manufacturers.

    Results show that the use of advanced manufacturing technology is widespread, especially in large firms, that multiple-technology use is the norm, and that technologies are generally combined within, as opposed to across, production stages. The technology revolution has been felt more in the area of inspection and communications, and less in fabrication and assembly. In terms of performance, technology-using establishments pay higher wages, enjoy higher labour productivity, and are gaining market share at the expense of non-users.

    Release date: 1995-08-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995067
    Description:

    The role of technical innovation in economic growth is both a current matter of keen public policy interest, and active exploration in economic theory. However, formal economic theorizing is often constrained by considerations of mathematical tractability. Evolutionary economic theories which are realized as computerized microsimulation models offer significant promise both for transcending mathematical constraints and addressing fundamental questions in a more realistic and flexible manner. This paper sketches XEcon, a microsimulation model of economic growth in the evolutionary tradition.

    Release date: 1995-06-30

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