Statistics by subject – Information and communications technology

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All (14)

All (14) (14 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998120
    Description:

    Considerable attention has been directed at understanding the structural changes that are generating an increased need for skilled workers. These changes are perceived to be the result of developments associated with the emergence of the new knowledge economy, whose potential is often linked to the growth of new technology-based firms (NTBFs). Where are these firms to be found? Related work on changes in technology and innovativeness has been accompanied by the creation of taxonomies that classify industries as high-tech or high-knowledge, based primarily on the characteristics of large firms. There is a temptation to use these taxonomies to identify new technology-based firms only within certain sectors. This paper uses a special survey that collected data on new firms to argue that this would be unwise.

    The paper investigates the limitations of existing classification schemes that might be used to classify industries as high- or low-tech, as advanced or otherwise. Characteristically unidimensional in scope, many of these taxonomies employ conceptual and operational measures that are narrow and incomplete. Consequently, previous rankings that identify sectors as high- or low-tech using these measures obscure the degree of innovativeness and human capital formation exhibited by certain industries. In a policy environment wherein emotive 'scoreboard' classifications have direct effects on resource allocation, the social costs of misclassification are potentially significant.

    Using a comparative methodology, this study investigates the role that conceptualization plays in devising taxonomies of high- and low-tech industries. Far from producing definitive classifications, existing measures of technological advancement are found to be wanting when their underpinnings are examined closely. Our objective in the current analysis is to examine the limitations of standard classification schemes, particularly when applied to new small firms, and to suggest an alternative framework based on a competency-model of the firm.

    Release date: 1998-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1995005
    Description:

    The new reality in the telecommunication service industry is one of competition among service suppliers for market shares. This paper analyzes and presents information from a survey on the demand and diffusion of telecommunication services by Business Services firms.

    Businesses care very much about the prices of these services. At the same time they care about the range and the quality of services offered. They believe that use of such services is indispensable in dealing with their clients and improves their productivity. Currently, the service used the most is facsimile. Large firms use telecommunication services more extensively than others and they are taking full advantage of competition. 61% of the large firms surveyed use at least one alternative supplier. Firms in the computer services industry have a different pattern of use than other industries in the group. There is potential for growth in the use of all services.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1996009
    Description:

    Technological advances and changes in the regulatory environment lead to convergence between the telecommunications, broadcasting and computer services sectors. The Information Highway will allow people to search for employment, pay their bills, book their travel arrangements, purchase goods and services, consult civil service advisors, use interactive educational and entertainment services and much more from their home. The Information Highway Advisory Council report recommends universal access at affordable prices as a policy objective, so that every Canadian, and not just a privileged few, may enjoy the benefits.

    Telephone and cable networks are expected to be the backbone of the Information Highway infrastructure. However, households need to have terminals, such as computers and modems, which will be connected to the networks. The paper analyzes the characteristics of those Canadian households that have already made the decision to purchase and use these terminal devices. Telephone, cable, computer and modem penetration rates are examined with respect to several economic and socio-demographic variables, such as income, education, employment status, age, family composition, provincial and residential location. This helps to identify the major determinants behind these choices which, in turn, can assist the design of policies towards universal access. Telephone penetration is nearly complete and cable penetration is quite high. Although computer and modem penetration rates are much lower they are increasing fast. There is a very strong relationship between household income and computer and modem penetration rates, and education exerts an influence independent of income. Age has had important effects that are independent of income, and its influence will continue to be felt as the age distribution of the population changes in the future. Household composition also plays a role, and households in urban areas are better equipped than households in rural areas.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1995006
    Description:

    This paper traces the path of television in Canada, from its introduction in 1952 to the present, examines its economics, discusses aspects of its content and takes a glimpse at its future.

    Television stations compete more than ever before for advertising dollars. This reflects the increase in the number of stations as well as the emergence of specialty channels. At the same time, technological advancements have expanded the use television to more than just program viewing, while the average viewing time is on the decline. There exists an asymmetry between revenue generation and program expenses. Specifically, the advertising revenues generated by news and information do not cover the cost of production, while drama generates more advertising revenues than is required for its production or purchase.

    The multi-channel universe promised by direct to home satellite broadcasting not only threatens even more the advertising revenue of television stations, but exerts further pressure on cable companies as well.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1997013
    Description:

    This paper is a sequel to the Access to the information highway paper (63F0002 no.9) published last year. It updates to 1996 the penetration rates of telephones, cable, computers and modems, and also provides 1996 data on cellular phones and Internet use. The penetration rates of these commodities are analyzed in relation to several socioeconomic and demographic variables.

    Virtually all households have a telephone, while almost three in four have cable, one in seven has their own cellular phone, and nearly one in three has a computer. Although half of the computer households have a modem, less than half of these particular households use their modem to access the Internet.

    Household income strongly affects penetration rates for cellular phones, computers and Internet use. However, among those with a computer, education level is a stronger predictor of Internet use than income. In contrast, for cellular phone penetration rates, income is a stronger predictor than education.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998017
    Description:

    This article describes and quantifies the growth of Canada's dynamic software and computer services industry in the 1990s. Results show that the industry's ouput has doubled in the 1990s, and that its workforce's size and remuneration levels also grew rapidly. The article explores the industry's three largest growth areas (professional services, data processing services and software products development) and offers insights into why these areas are growing. Also examined are international policy developments affecting the industry, including the Voorburg Group and recent trade agreements. The article also discusses the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) and how it will improve statistical measurements of this, and other, service industries.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 61F0057M1998002
    Description:

    Survey highlights

    Release date: 1998-10-02

  • Table: 56-001-X19980025195
    Description:

    Total broadcasting revenue of the private sector was $2,574.9 million compared to $2,391.6 million in 1996, an increase of 7.7%. Total expenses for private stations which include departmental, depreciation and interest expenses increased 3.4% to $2,337.4 million from $2,261.0 million in 1996.

    Release date: 1998-07-14

  • Table: 56-001-X19980015196
    Description:

    Through a special survey of cellular service providers, Statistics Canada has compiled the first comprehensive statistical record of the cellular telephone industry's development between 1987 and 1996. The data quantify the growth and financial performance of the industry.

    Release date: 1998-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19970043642
    Description:

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: to examine the components of growth in the software development and computer service industry; and to juxtapose this against developments in international policy circles affecting both this industry and service industries in general. Part I offers a description of the major components of this industry with respect to classification. Part II examines recent trends at the industry and subsector level, showing how this industry has evolved through the 1990s.

    Release date: 1998-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19980048274
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on the major areas of the criminal justice system (police, courts, legal aid, prosecutions and correctional services), as well as on a variety of current topics and issues related to justice in Canada.

    Release date: 1998-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 61F0057M1998001
    Description:

    The Survey on Preparedness of Canadian Business for the Year 2000 was conducted by Statistics Canada on behalf of Task Force Year 2000 to assess the business community's readiness for the Year 2000 computer problem. The survey found that more than half of Canadian businesses with more than five employees are doing nothing to address this issue. Moreover, less than 1 in 10 firms have a formal plan to assess, convert and test systems for the date change to 2000. Some 2% of firms have implemented and completed all phases of a plan, and a further 16% have taken less formal steps and say their systems are confirmed to be ready for 2000.This report takes a closer look at the survey results to determine how businesses in different industries and size categories are preparing for potential difficulties, and it assesses the general cost and magnitude of fixing the problem.

    Release date: 1998-02-03

  • Articles and reports: 61-532-X19970013507
    Description:

    The reality of the Information Highway (IH) is transforming business practices, individual behaviours and government policies. Its potential is generating hype ranging from upbeat optimism about a brave new world with converging technologies as its harbinger, to outright concerns about employment and privacy. The infrastructures of the IH accommodate transactions that pave the way towards an Information Society.

    Release date: 1998-02-02

  • Articles and reports: 61-532-X19970013508
    Description:

    Information technology is a dynamic, multifaceted sector of the Canadian economy. It is at the leading edge of technology, exhibiting rapid and at times radical change. The sector is composed of large numbers of small, rapidly growing companies as well as some very large, long-established ones.

    Release date: 1998-02-02

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

Analysis (12)

Analysis (12) (12 of 12 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998120
    Description:

    Considerable attention has been directed at understanding the structural changes that are generating an increased need for skilled workers. These changes are perceived to be the result of developments associated with the emergence of the new knowledge economy, whose potential is often linked to the growth of new technology-based firms (NTBFs). Where are these firms to be found? Related work on changes in technology and innovativeness has been accompanied by the creation of taxonomies that classify industries as high-tech or high-knowledge, based primarily on the characteristics of large firms. There is a temptation to use these taxonomies to identify new technology-based firms only within certain sectors. This paper uses a special survey that collected data on new firms to argue that this would be unwise.

    The paper investigates the limitations of existing classification schemes that might be used to classify industries as high- or low-tech, as advanced or otherwise. Characteristically unidimensional in scope, many of these taxonomies employ conceptual and operational measures that are narrow and incomplete. Consequently, previous rankings that identify sectors as high- or low-tech using these measures obscure the degree of innovativeness and human capital formation exhibited by certain industries. In a policy environment wherein emotive 'scoreboard' classifications have direct effects on resource allocation, the social costs of misclassification are potentially significant.

    Using a comparative methodology, this study investigates the role that conceptualization plays in devising taxonomies of high- and low-tech industries. Far from producing definitive classifications, existing measures of technological advancement are found to be wanting when their underpinnings are examined closely. Our objective in the current analysis is to examine the limitations of standard classification schemes, particularly when applied to new small firms, and to suggest an alternative framework based on a competency-model of the firm.

    Release date: 1998-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1995005
    Description:

    The new reality in the telecommunication service industry is one of competition among service suppliers for market shares. This paper analyzes and presents information from a survey on the demand and diffusion of telecommunication services by Business Services firms.

    Businesses care very much about the prices of these services. At the same time they care about the range and the quality of services offered. They believe that use of such services is indispensable in dealing with their clients and improves their productivity. Currently, the service used the most is facsimile. Large firms use telecommunication services more extensively than others and they are taking full advantage of competition. 61% of the large firms surveyed use at least one alternative supplier. Firms in the computer services industry have a different pattern of use than other industries in the group. There is potential for growth in the use of all services.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1996009
    Description:

    Technological advances and changes in the regulatory environment lead to convergence between the telecommunications, broadcasting and computer services sectors. The Information Highway will allow people to search for employment, pay their bills, book their travel arrangements, purchase goods and services, consult civil service advisors, use interactive educational and entertainment services and much more from their home. The Information Highway Advisory Council report recommends universal access at affordable prices as a policy objective, so that every Canadian, and not just a privileged few, may enjoy the benefits.

    Telephone and cable networks are expected to be the backbone of the Information Highway infrastructure. However, households need to have terminals, such as computers and modems, which will be connected to the networks. The paper analyzes the characteristics of those Canadian households that have already made the decision to purchase and use these terminal devices. Telephone, cable, computer and modem penetration rates are examined with respect to several economic and socio-demographic variables, such as income, education, employment status, age, family composition, provincial and residential location. This helps to identify the major determinants behind these choices which, in turn, can assist the design of policies towards universal access. Telephone penetration is nearly complete and cable penetration is quite high. Although computer and modem penetration rates are much lower they are increasing fast. There is a very strong relationship between household income and computer and modem penetration rates, and education exerts an influence independent of income. Age has had important effects that are independent of income, and its influence will continue to be felt as the age distribution of the population changes in the future. Household composition also plays a role, and households in urban areas are better equipped than households in rural areas.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1995006
    Description:

    This paper traces the path of television in Canada, from its introduction in 1952 to the present, examines its economics, discusses aspects of its content and takes a glimpse at its future.

    Television stations compete more than ever before for advertising dollars. This reflects the increase in the number of stations as well as the emergence of specialty channels. At the same time, technological advancements have expanded the use television to more than just program viewing, while the average viewing time is on the decline. There exists an asymmetry between revenue generation and program expenses. Specifically, the advertising revenues generated by news and information do not cover the cost of production, while drama generates more advertising revenues than is required for its production or purchase.

    The multi-channel universe promised by direct to home satellite broadcasting not only threatens even more the advertising revenue of television stations, but exerts further pressure on cable companies as well.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1997013
    Description:

    This paper is a sequel to the Access to the information highway paper (63F0002 no.9) published last year. It updates to 1996 the penetration rates of telephones, cable, computers and modems, and also provides 1996 data on cellular phones and Internet use. The penetration rates of these commodities are analyzed in relation to several socioeconomic and demographic variables.

    Virtually all households have a telephone, while almost three in four have cable, one in seven has their own cellular phone, and nearly one in three has a computer. Although half of the computer households have a modem, less than half of these particular households use their modem to access the Internet.

    Household income strongly affects penetration rates for cellular phones, computers and Internet use. However, among those with a computer, education level is a stronger predictor of Internet use than income. In contrast, for cellular phone penetration rates, income is a stronger predictor than education.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998017
    Description:

    This article describes and quantifies the growth of Canada's dynamic software and computer services industry in the 1990s. Results show that the industry's ouput has doubled in the 1990s, and that its workforce's size and remuneration levels also grew rapidly. The article explores the industry's three largest growth areas (professional services, data processing services and software products development) and offers insights into why these areas are growing. Also examined are international policy developments affecting the industry, including the Voorburg Group and recent trade agreements. The article also discusses the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) and how it will improve statistical measurements of this, and other, service industries.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 61F0057M1998002
    Description:

    Survey highlights

    Release date: 1998-10-02

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19970043642
    Description:

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: to examine the components of growth in the software development and computer service industry; and to juxtapose this against developments in international policy circles affecting both this industry and service industries in general. Part I offers a description of the major components of this industry with respect to classification. Part II examines recent trends at the industry and subsector level, showing how this industry has evolved through the 1990s.

    Release date: 1998-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19980048274
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on the major areas of the criminal justice system (police, courts, legal aid, prosecutions and correctional services), as well as on a variety of current topics and issues related to justice in Canada.

    Release date: 1998-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 61F0057M1998001
    Description:

    The Survey on Preparedness of Canadian Business for the Year 2000 was conducted by Statistics Canada on behalf of Task Force Year 2000 to assess the business community's readiness for the Year 2000 computer problem. The survey found that more than half of Canadian businesses with more than five employees are doing nothing to address this issue. Moreover, less than 1 in 10 firms have a formal plan to assess, convert and test systems for the date change to 2000. Some 2% of firms have implemented and completed all phases of a plan, and a further 16% have taken less formal steps and say their systems are confirmed to be ready for 2000.This report takes a closer look at the survey results to determine how businesses in different industries and size categories are preparing for potential difficulties, and it assesses the general cost and magnitude of fixing the problem.

    Release date: 1998-02-03

  • Articles and reports: 61-532-X19970013507
    Description:

    The reality of the Information Highway (IH) is transforming business practices, individual behaviours and government policies. Its potential is generating hype ranging from upbeat optimism about a brave new world with converging technologies as its harbinger, to outright concerns about employment and privacy. The infrastructures of the IH accommodate transactions that pave the way towards an Information Society.

    Release date: 1998-02-02

  • Articles and reports: 61-532-X19970013508
    Description:

    Information technology is a dynamic, multifaceted sector of the Canadian economy. It is at the leading edge of technology, exhibiting rapid and at times radical change. The sector is composed of large numbers of small, rapidly growing companies as well as some very large, long-established ones.

    Release date: 1998-02-02

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