Statistics by subject – Information and communications technology

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (43)

All (43) (25 of 43 results)

Data (11)

Data (11) (11 of 11 results)

Analysis (27)

Analysis (27) (25 of 27 results)

Reference (5)

Reference (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007457
    Description:

    The Canadian economy is characterized by the size of the service sector. Elsewhere, the research and development (R&D) activity contributes to the growth of the economy. Paradoxically, R&D is sometime considered as an activity performed by the manufacturing sector. This article sheds light on the importance of efforts dedicated to R&D in the business services sector.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Index and guides: 56M0002G
    Description:

    This guide is for the Household Internet Use Survey microdata file. The Household Internet Use Survey is being conducted by Statistics Canada on behalf of Industry Canada. The information from this survey will assist the Science and Technology Redesign Project at Statistics Canada to fulfil a three-year contractual agreement between them and the Telecommunications and Policy Branch of Industry Canada. The Household Internet Use Survey is a voluntary survey. It will provide information on the use of computers for communication purposes, and households' access and use of the Internet from home.

    The objective of this survey is to measure the demand for telecommunications services by Canadian households. To assess the demand, we measure the frequency and intensity of use of what is commonly referred to as "the information highway" among other things. This was done by asking questions relating to the accessibility of the Internet to Canadian households both at home, the workplace and a number of other locations. The information collected will be used to update and expand upon previous studies done by Statistics Canada on the topic of the Information Highway.

    Release date: 2004-09-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004010
    Description:

    This paper analyses data from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology 2002 that looks at the acquisition of significantly improved technologies and the introduction of new or significantly improved products to the market. The target groups are technological innovators (firms that acquired new technologies and/or sold new products), and non-innovators (firms that neither acquired new technologies nor sold new products). A series of profiles is presented of information communication technology (ICT) use as well as barriers to its use for technological innovators and non-innovators.

    Release date: 2004-05-21

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004001
    Description:

    Technological changes are occurring at home, work and play. In the workplace, change occurs in how business is conducted, its production processes and office procedures and much of this change is related to the introduction of new or significantly improved technologies. This paper is based on information from the 2002 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) (see the Appendix) and concentrates on the acquisition of significantly improved technologies in the private sector. The private sector and its two major subsectors, the goods producing and services producing sectors, are presented by employment-size groups. The technological change rates by major sector are also provided.

    Technological change in the workplace includes the seemingly simple purchases of off-the-shelf technologies such as accounting software; colour printers with double-sided printing and facsimile capabilities; and sophisticated medical diagnostic machines and equipment. Acquisition of new or significantly improved technologies is not limited to purchases, but also includes leasing and licensing as well as customizing and developing technologies. Another technology acquisition method, which could incorporate all of the other technology acquisition methods, is 'putting into place an improved production facility' by, for example, retro-fitting pulp and paper mills. At the turn of the new century, the Canadian private sector is not resisting the lure of change - 4 out of 10 private sector firms introduced technological change from 2000 to 2002.

    Release date: 2004-01-19

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2004066
    Description:

    Recent studies have shown that fewer rural Canadians were using the Internet than urban Canadians, despite new developments in information and communication technologies (ICTs) (Thompson-James 1999, McLaren 2002). The growth of the Internet has been portrayed as an innovative medium for the exchange of information, which could provide new opportunities to rural Canadians. The purpose of this study is to estimate and to analyse the determinants of Internet use by Canadians in order to understand the factors associated with lower Internet use in rural Canada, with specific emphasis on whether 'rurality' acts as an independent factor on Internet use.

    Release date: 2004-01-06

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: