Statistics by subject – Information and communications technology

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All (29)

All (29) (25 of 29 results)

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2005048
    Description:

    This article compares the performance and characteristics of fast-growing small- and mid-sized Canadian Internet service providers (ISPs) with those of their slower-growing counterparts. The study also examines the different strategies employed by the two groups as well as their differing perceptions of potential impediments to their growth.

    The main findings relate to the effects of the two groups' business strategies on their core business and diversification, revenues and expenses, broadband and narrowband services, subscriber base and customer retention rates, connection options and growth impediments.

    Release date: 2005-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2005012
    Description:

    This paper investigates relationships between adult literacy skills and use of information and communications technologies (ICTs). Using the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL), it becomes possible to compare respondents' ICT use, based on self-assessed ICT use patterns and attitudes toward computers, with literacy skills and a number of socio-demographic characteristics, including age, gender and educational attainment. The paper offers data for Canada, its provinces and territories, as well as five other countries (Bermuda, the United States, Italy, Norway and Switzerland), allowing international and inter-provincial comparisons. An important objective of the paper is to examine outcomes associated with literacy skills in combination with patterns of ICT use, and this is achieved by profiling these characteristics and studying their relationships with respondent income. In addition, it offers a portrait of adults' computer and Internet use, including purposes of use, attitudes toward computers, and use of other ICTs, and analyzes such use, with a detailed focus on Canada.

    Patterns of Internet and computer access confirm the existence of "digital divides" both within and between nations. Apart from Italy, differences between the countries included in this study are not large. However, as found elsewhere, large divides exist within countries when examining respondents grouped by their level of income. In Canada, the Western provinces, the territories, and Ontario emerge as leaders in ICT use, although regional patterns are complex and vary depending on the specific technology examined.

    Many other factors are also strongly associated with respondents' ICT use. Age, gender, educational attainment, and level of literacy proficiency help predict whether a respondent is a "high-intensity" computer user. A significant decline in ICT use is found to occur after age 45 in all countries. The findings for ICT use by gender, however, were mixed. In the European countries included in this study (Italy, Norway and Switzerland), clear gender differences emerge but no such gap exists in North America. Respondents with less than upper-secondary education are significantly less likely to use computers for a range of purposes, and this pattern is most pronounced in Italy and Bermuda. In addition, scales that measure individuals' use of computers and the Internet, and attitudes toward computers, tend to increase with the literacy proficiency of respondents.

    Finally, literacy and computer use profiles are strongly related to the likelihood that respondents have high earnings. In most countries included in this study, adults who have average or higher literacy skills and who are intensive computer users have about three to six times the odds of being in the top quartile of personal income, compared to respondents with below average literacy skills and less intensive computer use.

    Release date: 2005-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2005033
    Description:

    In 2004, e-commerce sales were $26.5 billion for private firms in Canada. The paper focuses on the strength of business-to-business sales that accounted for 75% of this total. In particular, the trends in three sectors - wholesale trade, manufacturing and retail trade - are examined. Data from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology is used in the analysis.

    Release date: 2005-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005035
    Description:

    This study examines the impact of information and communication technologies (ICT) and of foreign outsourcing on the demand for skilled workers. One of the defining features of the Canadian economy in the last two decades has been an increasing wage gap between more- and less-skilled workers. Over the same period, there have been dramatic increases in expenditures on information and communication technologies and in purchases of foreign intermediate inputs. Using data for 84 Canadian manufacturing industries over the 1981-1996 period, we find that both ICT and foreign outsourcing are important contributors to the demand for skills.

    Release date: 2005-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050038760
    Description:

    In recent years, the Government of Canada has made substantial new investment in university research with research funding of $4.0 billion in 2003. To commercialize their technologies, Canadian universities and hospitals created 64 spin-off companies in 2003, for a total of 876 created to date. This article highlights some of the changes between 2001 and 2003, as well as presenting the latest regional results.

    Release date: 2005-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050038762
    Description:

    The penetration of information and communications technologies (ICTs), most notably computers and the Internet, has been analyzed extensively in recent years. Studies of the digital divide have identified important gaps in access and use of ICTs between different groups of people, depending on their demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. The results of a Statistics Canada survey combined measure of individuals' computer use and literacy in order to get to such outcomes.

    Release date: 2005-10-26

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005012
    Description:

    This working paper highlights a variety of aspects of innovation in the information and communications technology (ICT) services sector industries including incidence and types of innovation, novelty of innovation, innovation activities, sources of information and collaboration, problems and obstacles to innovation and impacts of innovation.

    Release date: 2005-10-25

  • Table: 56-001-X20050048656
    Description:

    This issue of the Bulletin presents financial and operating statistics for the cable, direct-to-home satellite and wireless cable television industries for the 2001 to 2004 period.

    Release date: 2005-10-20

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20050008660
    Description:

    Electronic commerce in Canada has grown from $5.7 billion in 2000 to over $28 billion in 2004. Despite this growth, barriers remain to e-commerce's effective integration into the economy. The authors compare responses to Statistic Canada's Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology for the years 2001 and 2003. This Canada-wide business survey lists ten barriers to e-commerce adoption and asks firms to identify those that apply. The authors identify statistically significant changes over time and show that barriers are changing, but are not consistent across firm size or industry sector. The authors conclude that policies aimed at encouraging e-commerce adoption must be specific to both firm size and industry sector.

    Release date: 2005-10-20

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20050008658
    Description:

    The vast majority of Internet service providers (ISPs) in Canada are small- and medium-sized companies striving to compete with large and more dominant telecommunication and cable companies.

    Based on data from Statistics Canada's Annual Survey of Internet Service Providers and Related Services for 2000 and 2002, this article compares the performance and characteristics of fast-growing small- and mid-sized Canadian ISPs with those of their slower-growing counterparts. The study also examines the different strategies employed by the two groups as well as their differing perceptions of potential impediments to their growth.

    The main findings relate to the effects of the two groups' business strategies on their core business and diversification, revenues and expenses, broadband and narrowband services, subscriber base and customer retention rates, connection options and growth impediments.

    Release date: 2005-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510713146
    Description:

    Workers who use computers earn more than those who do not. Is this a productivity effect or merely selection (that is, workers selected to use computers are more productive to begin with). After controlling for selection, the average worker enjoys a wage premium of 3.8% upon adopting a computer. This premium, however, obscures important differences by education and occupation. Long-run returns to computer use are over 5% for most workers. Differences between short-run and long-run returns suggest that workers may share training costs through sacrificed wages.

    Release date: 2005-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005034
    Description:

    This report presents information on the information and communications technologies (ICT) infrastructure and reach in all responding First Nations schools in Canada. It uses data from the 2003/04 Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey.

    Release date: 2005-08-22

  • Table: 56-001-X20050038057
    Description:

    This issue of the Bulletin presents financial and operating statistics for the private radio industry for the 2001 to 2004 period.

    Release date: 2005-08-03

  • Articles and reports: 63-018-X20050018435
    Description:

    Examines small-and mid-sized Internet service providers, and probes the differences between faster growing Internet service providers and their slower-growing counterparts between 2000 and 2002.

    Release date: 2005-07-19

  • Table: 88-001-X20050048062
    Description:

    This service bulletin contains historical and current data on research and development (R&D) expenditures and personnel in Canada, by industry. In Canada, the industrial or business enterprise sector is the largest R&D performer.

    Release date: 2005-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028015
    Description:

    Canada has been a connected nation for many years. The penetration of basic telephone service and of cable services have been and remain amongst the highest in the world. The networks most used by Canadians are the wireline telephone network, the cable television network, the wireless telephone network, the Internet, and the satellite and MDS television networks. This article highlights the amazing speed at which connectivity is evolving.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028014
    Description:

    It is difficult to imagine, particularly for younger Canadians, that mobile telecommunications devices were a curiosity only 20 years ago. In fact, mobile communications were not that common as recently as 10 years ago when less than 2 million devices were connected to our wireless networks. While the rate of adoption of the Internet in Canada is one of the highest in the world and the rate of adoption of satellite television is showing signs of a slowdown, there still seems to be considerable potential for growth in the wireless telecommunications industry.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Table: 56-001-X20050028052
    Description:

    This issue of the Bulletin presents financial and operating statistics for the television broadcasting industry for the 2001 to 2004 period.

    Release date: 2005-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005028
    Description:

    This paper examines student-educator ratios and per-capita education expenditures within the context of the presence of a teacher-librarian. The presence of library staff such as teacher-librarians or library technicians is reviewed by province, on a per school and per student basis. In addition, the presence of school libraries in rural and urban schools and public versus private schools is considered.

    Release date: 2005-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030017816
    Description:

    This article examines the use of computers, e-mail and the Internet in the culture sector in industries such as recording production, film and publishing, performing arts and heritage institutions.

    Release date: 2005-04-07

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005007
    Description:

    This report summarises an expert meeting hosted by the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division on commercialization. The purpose of the meeting was to identify indicators that could be used in support of evidence-based commercialisation policy, and a conceptual framework to tie them together. The findings were that it was premature to adopt a single conceptual framework and that it was important to measure linkages among public sector actors and between those in the public and private sectors if the activity of commercialization was to be better understood.

    Release date: 2005-03-18

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005006
    Description:

    This research workshop part of the foresight function of the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division, was co-sponsored and hosted by the University of Windsor. The workshop placed the performance of commercialisation in the context of recent federal policy and history. It provided an opportunity for people involved in producing intellectual property for commercialisation to tell their stories. Legal experts advised on the problems of managing intellectual property and on how to make academics, and their private sector partners, better informed about intellectual property protection mechanisms. Recommendations on measurements of commercialisation activities are presented in the report.

    Release date: 2005-03-18

  • Table: 56-001-X20050017817
    Description:

    This issue of the Bulletin presents financial and operating statistics for wireline and wireless telecommunication services industries for the 2000 to 2003 period.

    Release date: 2005-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2005010
    Description:

    This paper tracks the growth and decline of information and communications technology (ICT) industries that were synonymous with the so-called new economy boom of the late-1990s and its subsequent bust period in the early 2000s. The analysis focuses on the question of whether the ICT bust has been accompanied by a structural shift illustrated by less firm turnover. It shows that to date there is little evidence of a structural shift. Entry rates of new establishments within the ICT sector were above those of other sectors within the economy during both the ICT boom and bust. This is evidence that both firms and entrepreneurs continued to see opportunities to develop new products and markets even during a time of retrenchment. The location of the ICT sector also show little evidence of a change.

    Release date: 2005-03-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050017766
    Description:

    In 2003 more Canadian households were paying for their goods and services online. Access is critical and households with a high-speed connection were more likely to be electronic commerce households. This article presents data from the Household Internet Use Survey 2003.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

Data (5)

Data (5) (5 of 5 results)

Analysis (17)

Analysis (17) (17 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2005048
    Description:

    This article compares the performance and characteristics of fast-growing small- and mid-sized Canadian Internet service providers (ISPs) with those of their slower-growing counterparts. The study also examines the different strategies employed by the two groups as well as their differing perceptions of potential impediments to their growth.

    The main findings relate to the effects of the two groups' business strategies on their core business and diversification, revenues and expenses, broadband and narrowband services, subscriber base and customer retention rates, connection options and growth impediments.

    Release date: 2005-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2005012
    Description:

    This paper investigates relationships between adult literacy skills and use of information and communications technologies (ICTs). Using the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL), it becomes possible to compare respondents' ICT use, based on self-assessed ICT use patterns and attitudes toward computers, with literacy skills and a number of socio-demographic characteristics, including age, gender and educational attainment. The paper offers data for Canada, its provinces and territories, as well as five other countries (Bermuda, the United States, Italy, Norway and Switzerland), allowing international and inter-provincial comparisons. An important objective of the paper is to examine outcomes associated with literacy skills in combination with patterns of ICT use, and this is achieved by profiling these characteristics and studying their relationships with respondent income. In addition, it offers a portrait of adults' computer and Internet use, including purposes of use, attitudes toward computers, and use of other ICTs, and analyzes such use, with a detailed focus on Canada.

    Patterns of Internet and computer access confirm the existence of "digital divides" both within and between nations. Apart from Italy, differences between the countries included in this study are not large. However, as found elsewhere, large divides exist within countries when examining respondents grouped by their level of income. In Canada, the Western provinces, the territories, and Ontario emerge as leaders in ICT use, although regional patterns are complex and vary depending on the specific technology examined.

    Many other factors are also strongly associated with respondents' ICT use. Age, gender, educational attainment, and level of literacy proficiency help predict whether a respondent is a "high-intensity" computer user. A significant decline in ICT use is found to occur after age 45 in all countries. The findings for ICT use by gender, however, were mixed. In the European countries included in this study (Italy, Norway and Switzerland), clear gender differences emerge but no such gap exists in North America. Respondents with less than upper-secondary education are significantly less likely to use computers for a range of purposes, and this pattern is most pronounced in Italy and Bermuda. In addition, scales that measure individuals' use of computers and the Internet, and attitudes toward computers, tend to increase with the literacy proficiency of respondents.

    Finally, literacy and computer use profiles are strongly related to the likelihood that respondents have high earnings. In most countries included in this study, adults who have average or higher literacy skills and who are intensive computer users have about three to six times the odds of being in the top quartile of personal income, compared to respondents with below average literacy skills and less intensive computer use.

    Release date: 2005-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2005033
    Description:

    In 2004, e-commerce sales were $26.5 billion for private firms in Canada. The paper focuses on the strength of business-to-business sales that accounted for 75% of this total. In particular, the trends in three sectors - wholesale trade, manufacturing and retail trade - are examined. Data from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology is used in the analysis.

    Release date: 2005-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005035
    Description:

    This study examines the impact of information and communication technologies (ICT) and of foreign outsourcing on the demand for skilled workers. One of the defining features of the Canadian economy in the last two decades has been an increasing wage gap between more- and less-skilled workers. Over the same period, there have been dramatic increases in expenditures on information and communication technologies and in purchases of foreign intermediate inputs. Using data for 84 Canadian manufacturing industries over the 1981-1996 period, we find that both ICT and foreign outsourcing are important contributors to the demand for skills.

    Release date: 2005-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050038760
    Description:

    In recent years, the Government of Canada has made substantial new investment in university research with research funding of $4.0 billion in 2003. To commercialize their technologies, Canadian universities and hospitals created 64 spin-off companies in 2003, for a total of 876 created to date. This article highlights some of the changes between 2001 and 2003, as well as presenting the latest regional results.

    Release date: 2005-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050038762
    Description:

    The penetration of information and communications technologies (ICTs), most notably computers and the Internet, has been analyzed extensively in recent years. Studies of the digital divide have identified important gaps in access and use of ICTs between different groups of people, depending on their demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. The results of a Statistics Canada survey combined measure of individuals' computer use and literacy in order to get to such outcomes.

    Release date: 2005-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510713146
    Description:

    Workers who use computers earn more than those who do not. Is this a productivity effect or merely selection (that is, workers selected to use computers are more productive to begin with). After controlling for selection, the average worker enjoys a wage premium of 3.8% upon adopting a computer. This premium, however, obscures important differences by education and occupation. Long-run returns to computer use are over 5% for most workers. Differences between short-run and long-run returns suggest that workers may share training costs through sacrificed wages.

    Release date: 2005-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005034
    Description:

    This report presents information on the information and communications technologies (ICT) infrastructure and reach in all responding First Nations schools in Canada. It uses data from the 2003/04 Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey.

    Release date: 2005-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 63-018-X20050018435
    Description:

    Examines small-and mid-sized Internet service providers, and probes the differences between faster growing Internet service providers and their slower-growing counterparts between 2000 and 2002.

    Release date: 2005-07-19

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028015
    Description:

    Canada has been a connected nation for many years. The penetration of basic telephone service and of cable services have been and remain amongst the highest in the world. The networks most used by Canadians are the wireline telephone network, the cable television network, the wireless telephone network, the Internet, and the satellite and MDS television networks. This article highlights the amazing speed at which connectivity is evolving.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028014
    Description:

    It is difficult to imagine, particularly for younger Canadians, that mobile telecommunications devices were a curiosity only 20 years ago. In fact, mobile communications were not that common as recently as 10 years ago when less than 2 million devices were connected to our wireless networks. While the rate of adoption of the Internet in Canada is one of the highest in the world and the rate of adoption of satellite television is showing signs of a slowdown, there still seems to be considerable potential for growth in the wireless telecommunications industry.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005028
    Description:

    This paper examines student-educator ratios and per-capita education expenditures within the context of the presence of a teacher-librarian. The presence of library staff such as teacher-librarians or library technicians is reviewed by province, on a per school and per student basis. In addition, the presence of school libraries in rural and urban schools and public versus private schools is considered.

    Release date: 2005-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030017816
    Description:

    This article examines the use of computers, e-mail and the Internet in the culture sector in industries such as recording production, film and publishing, performing arts and heritage institutions.

    Release date: 2005-04-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2005010
    Description:

    This paper tracks the growth and decline of information and communications technology (ICT) industries that were synonymous with the so-called new economy boom of the late-1990s and its subsequent bust period in the early 2000s. The analysis focuses on the question of whether the ICT bust has been accompanied by a structural shift illustrated by less firm turnover. It shows that to date there is little evidence of a structural shift. Entry rates of new establishments within the ICT sector were above those of other sectors within the economy during both the ICT boom and bust. This is evidence that both firms and entrepreneurs continued to see opportunities to develop new products and markets even during a time of retrenchment. The location of the ICT sector also show little evidence of a change.

    Release date: 2005-03-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050017766
    Description:

    In 2003 more Canadian households were paying for their goods and services online. Access is critical and households with a high-speed connection were more likely to be electronic commerce households. This article presents data from the Household Internet Use Survey 2003.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050017765
    Description:

    The percentage of firms using an extranet in Canada remains low with just over 6% of private firms using an extranet in 2003. Nonetheless, extranets could become an important part of the e-business landscape in Canada. This article examines the functionality of extranets that Canadian firms are currently employing.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2005006
    Description:

    The growth in micro-technologies and their widespread diffusion across economic sectors have given rise to what is often described as a New Economy - an economy in which competitive prospects are closely aligned with the firm's innovation and technology practices, and its use of skilled workers. Training is one strategy that many firms undertake in order to improve the quality of their workforce.

    This study contributes to the expanding body of research in the area of information and communication technologies (ICT). Using data on business sector workplaces from the 1999 Workplace and Employee Survey (WES), we investigate factors related to the incidence and intensity of training. The study focuses on whether training incidence and training intensity are more closely associated with the technological competencies of specific workplaces than with membership in ICT and science-based industry environments. The study finds that training incidence depends more on the technological competencies exhibited by individual workplaces. Among workplaces that decide to train, these technological competencies are also important determinants of the intensity of training.

    Workplaces which score highly on our index of technological competency are over three times more likely to train than those that rank zero on the competency index. The size of the workplace is also a factor. Large and medium-sized workplaces are 3 and 2.3 times more likely to train than small workplaces, respectively. And workplaces with higher-skilled workforces are more likely to train than workplaces with lower-skilled workforces.

    For workplaces that choose to train, their technological competency is the main determinant of training intensity. The size of the workplace, the average cost of training, and the skill level of the workforce are also influential factors'but to a lesser extent. Other factors, such as sector, outside sources of funding, and unionization status, are not influential factors in determining the intensity of training. Workplaces that have a higher average cost of training train fewer employees as a proportion of their workforce. However, the skill level of their employees moderates this effect, because as payroll-per-employee increases (a proxy for worker skills), plants train more.

    Release date: 2005-01-25

Reference (7)

Reference (7) (7 of 7 results)

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005012
    Description:

    This working paper highlights a variety of aspects of innovation in the information and communications technology (ICT) services sector industries including incidence and types of innovation, novelty of innovation, innovation activities, sources of information and collaboration, problems and obstacles to innovation and impacts of innovation.

    Release date: 2005-10-25

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20050008660
    Description:

    Electronic commerce in Canada has grown from $5.7 billion in 2000 to over $28 billion in 2004. Despite this growth, barriers remain to e-commerce's effective integration into the economy. The authors compare responses to Statistic Canada's Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology for the years 2001 and 2003. This Canada-wide business survey lists ten barriers to e-commerce adoption and asks firms to identify those that apply. The authors identify statistically significant changes over time and show that barriers are changing, but are not consistent across firm size or industry sector. The authors conclude that policies aimed at encouraging e-commerce adoption must be specific to both firm size and industry sector.

    Release date: 2005-10-20

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20050008658
    Description:

    The vast majority of Internet service providers (ISPs) in Canada are small- and medium-sized companies striving to compete with large and more dominant telecommunication and cable companies.

    Based on data from Statistics Canada's Annual Survey of Internet Service Providers and Related Services for 2000 and 2002, this article compares the performance and characteristics of fast-growing small- and mid-sized Canadian ISPs with those of their slower-growing counterparts. The study also examines the different strategies employed by the two groups as well as their differing perceptions of potential impediments to their growth.

    The main findings relate to the effects of the two groups' business strategies on their core business and diversification, revenues and expenses, broadband and narrowband services, subscriber base and customer retention rates, connection options and growth impediments.

    Release date: 2005-10-20

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005007
    Description:

    This report summarises an expert meeting hosted by the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division on commercialization. The purpose of the meeting was to identify indicators that could be used in support of evidence-based commercialisation policy, and a conceptual framework to tie them together. The findings were that it was premature to adopt a single conceptual framework and that it was important to measure linkages among public sector actors and between those in the public and private sectors if the activity of commercialization was to be better understood.

    Release date: 2005-03-18

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005006
    Description:

    This research workshop part of the foresight function of the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division, was co-sponsored and hosted by the University of Windsor. The workshop placed the performance of commercialisation in the context of recent federal policy and history. It provided an opportunity for people involved in producing intellectual property for commercialisation to tell their stories. Legal experts advised on the problems of managing intellectual property and on how to make academics, and their private sector partners, better informed about intellectual property protection mechanisms. Recommendations on measurements of commercialisation activities are presented in the report.

    Release date: 2005-03-18

  • Index and guides: 96-328-M2004027
    Description:

    This activity looks at the different ways in which technology is used on the farm.

    Release date: 2005-01-28

  • Index and guides: 96-328-M2004028
    Description:

    This lesson focuses on computer use on farms. As in other parts of society, computers are a part of farmers' lives. Computers provide much-needed information on farms and facilitate activities such as banking, marketing, communications and research.

    Release date: 2005-01-28

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