Statistics by subject – Information and communications technology

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (14)

All (14) (14 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007015
    Description:

    This paper illustrates how the statistical architecture of Canada's System of National Accounts can be utilized to study the size and composition of a specific economic sector. For illustrative purposes, the analysis focuses on the information and communications technology (ICT) sector, and hence, on the set of technology-producing industries and technology outputs most commonly associated with what is often termed the high-technology economy. Using supply and use tables from the input-output accounts, we develop integrated ICT industry and commodity classifications that link domestic technology producers to their principal commodity outputs. We then use these classifications to generate a series of descriptive statistics that examine the size of Canada's high-technology economy along with its underlying composition. In our view, these integrated ICT classifications can be used to develop a richer profile of the high-technology economy than one obtains from examining its industry or commodity dimensions in isolation.

    Release date: 2007-12-21

  • Table: 56-001-X200700210550
    Description:

    The statistics presented in this bulletin are for the year ending on August 31 and for the period from 2003 to 2006. The following text contains references to previous periods when it is useful to set the industry's performance in a historical context.

    Release date: 2007-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2007015
    Description:

    The 2005 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) included a module of questions on the extent and reasons for which Canadians use the Internet to connect with all levels of government - federal, provincial and municipal. This study examines the patterns of use for government online information and services among adult Canadians. A profile of government online users is developed in order to compare them with other Internet users and with non-users on the basis of various socio-demographic and Internet use characteristics. Concerns about Internet privacy and security are examined as potential barriers to the use of government online services. Finally, a multivariate logistic regression model helps to disentangle the various factors influencing the use of the Internet for government online activities.

    Release date: 2007-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200700410375
    Description:

    This article investigates the use of the Internet for education-related reasons based on findings from the 2005 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS). After providing an overview of Internet use in Canada, the article describes selected social, economic and geographic characteristics of those going online for education-related reasons. It then examines specific reasons for going online for education-related purposes, including for distance education, self-directed learning and correspondence courses. Finally, it examines urban and rural differences among those using the Internet for distance education.

    Release date: 2007-10-30

  • Table: 56-001-X200700110107
    Description:

    This publication presents financial and operating statistics for telecommunications services industries, except the Cable and Other Program Distribution industry

    Release date: 2007-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210327
    Description:

    Internet use is an important hallmark for participation in an information society. Although 68% of adult Canadians went online for personal, non-business reasons in 2005, digital inequality persists both geographically and among certain population groups. While much research and policy attention has been aimed at understanding the barriers to Internet use, there were an estimated 850,000 Canadians who had used the Internet at one time but were no longer doing so in 2005. Who are these former users and why have they discontinued their use of the Internet?

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210328
    Description:

    Although small firms were less likely than large firms to identify benefits from conducting business online, there has been growth in the proportion of firms indicating perceived benefits over the past five years in all size categories.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007003
    Description:

    This study investigates factors that influence Internet use with an emphasis on rural areas and small towns.

    Release date: 2007-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007302
    Description:

    The high-tech sector was a major driving force behind the Canadian economic recovery of the late 1990s. It is well known that the tide began to turn quite suddenly in 2001 when sector-wide employment and earnings halted this upward trend, despite continued gains in the rest of the economy. As informative as employment and earnings statistics may be, they do not paint a complete picture of the severity of the high-tech meltdown. A decline in employment may result from reduced hiring and natural attrition, as opposed to layoffs, while a decline in earnings among high-tech workers says little about the fortunes of laid-off workers who did not regain employment in the high-tech sector. In this study, I use a unique administrative data source to address both of these gaps in our knowledge of the high-tech meltdown. Specifically, the study explores permanent layoffs in the high-tech sector, as well as earnings losses of laid-off high-tech workers. The findings suggest that the high-tech meltdown resulted in a sudden and dramatic increase in the probability of experiencing a permanent layoff, which more than quadrupled in the manufacturing sector from 2000 to 2001. Ottawa-Gatineau workers in the industry were hit particularly hard on this front, as the permanent layoff rate rose by a factor of 11 from 2000 to 2001. Moreover, laid-off manufacturing high-tech workers who found a new job saw a very steep decline in earnings. This decline in earnings was well above the declines registered among any other groups of laid-off workers, including workers who were laid off during the "jobless recovery" of the 1990s. Among laid-off high-tech workers who found a new job, about four out of five did not locate employment in high-tech, and about one out of three moved to another city. In Ottawa-Gatineau, many former high-tech employees found jobs in the federal government. However, about two in five laid-off high-tech workers left the city.

    Release date: 2007-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019621
    Description:

    Advances in science, medical research and information and communications technologies (ICTs) are bringing about significant economic and societal transformations, the full impacts of which are only beginning to emerge. Canada's ICT sector, comprised of both manufacturing and service industries, e industries, is one of several important players in the strategy towards improving the country's innovation performance. In particular, the ICT service industries are leading the way in terms of economic growth and innovative activity.

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019625
    Description:

    In 2005, only 6% of Canadian firms sold goods online. Even though 43% of firms made purchases online, it appears that the majority of firms are still having difficulties adapting their business to the online environment or are simply choosing not to do so. In order for Canadian electronic commerce to continue its growth, it is important to identify the barriers and explore what firm characteristics, such as size and sector, may influence these barriers.

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019624
    Description:

    The Internet has changed the way many Canadians conduct their everyday activities, from viewing weather, news and sports to banking and paying bills. It has also changed the way many shop. In 2005, Canadians placed almost 50 million online orders valued at $7.9 billion. However, many of these orders were made by a relatively small group of people. In fact, Canada's top online spenders represented fewer than 7% of adult Canadians and accounted for three-quarters of total online expenditures to consumers. Who are these Canadians and what are they buying?

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2007083
    Description:

    This working paper outlines the results of a new study that notes that technology, prices and demography are key forces driving the economy in the nation's rural areas.

    Release date: 2007-02-13

Data (3)

Data (3) (3 results)

Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) (10 of 10 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007015
    Description:

    This paper illustrates how the statistical architecture of Canada's System of National Accounts can be utilized to study the size and composition of a specific economic sector. For illustrative purposes, the analysis focuses on the information and communications technology (ICT) sector, and hence, on the set of technology-producing industries and technology outputs most commonly associated with what is often termed the high-technology economy. Using supply and use tables from the input-output accounts, we develop integrated ICT industry and commodity classifications that link domestic technology producers to their principal commodity outputs. We then use these classifications to generate a series of descriptive statistics that examine the size of Canada's high-technology economy along with its underlying composition. In our view, these integrated ICT classifications can be used to develop a richer profile of the high-technology economy than one obtains from examining its industry or commodity dimensions in isolation.

    Release date: 2007-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2007015
    Description:

    The 2005 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) included a module of questions on the extent and reasons for which Canadians use the Internet to connect with all levels of government - federal, provincial and municipal. This study examines the patterns of use for government online information and services among adult Canadians. A profile of government online users is developed in order to compare them with other Internet users and with non-users on the basis of various socio-demographic and Internet use characteristics. Concerns about Internet privacy and security are examined as potential barriers to the use of government online services. Finally, a multivariate logistic regression model helps to disentangle the various factors influencing the use of the Internet for government online activities.

    Release date: 2007-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200700410375
    Description:

    This article investigates the use of the Internet for education-related reasons based on findings from the 2005 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS). After providing an overview of Internet use in Canada, the article describes selected social, economic and geographic characteristics of those going online for education-related reasons. It then examines specific reasons for going online for education-related purposes, including for distance education, self-directed learning and correspondence courses. Finally, it examines urban and rural differences among those using the Internet for distance education.

    Release date: 2007-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210327
    Description:

    Internet use is an important hallmark for participation in an information society. Although 68% of adult Canadians went online for personal, non-business reasons in 2005, digital inequality persists both geographically and among certain population groups. While much research and policy attention has been aimed at understanding the barriers to Internet use, there were an estimated 850,000 Canadians who had used the Internet at one time but were no longer doing so in 2005. Who are these former users and why have they discontinued their use of the Internet?

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210328
    Description:

    Although small firms were less likely than large firms to identify benefits from conducting business online, there has been growth in the proportion of firms indicating perceived benefits over the past five years in all size categories.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007003
    Description:

    This study investigates factors that influence Internet use with an emphasis on rural areas and small towns.

    Release date: 2007-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007302
    Description:

    The high-tech sector was a major driving force behind the Canadian economic recovery of the late 1990s. It is well known that the tide began to turn quite suddenly in 2001 when sector-wide employment and earnings halted this upward trend, despite continued gains in the rest of the economy. As informative as employment and earnings statistics may be, they do not paint a complete picture of the severity of the high-tech meltdown. A decline in employment may result from reduced hiring and natural attrition, as opposed to layoffs, while a decline in earnings among high-tech workers says little about the fortunes of laid-off workers who did not regain employment in the high-tech sector. In this study, I use a unique administrative data source to address both of these gaps in our knowledge of the high-tech meltdown. Specifically, the study explores permanent layoffs in the high-tech sector, as well as earnings losses of laid-off high-tech workers. The findings suggest that the high-tech meltdown resulted in a sudden and dramatic increase in the probability of experiencing a permanent layoff, which more than quadrupled in the manufacturing sector from 2000 to 2001. Ottawa-Gatineau workers in the industry were hit particularly hard on this front, as the permanent layoff rate rose by a factor of 11 from 2000 to 2001. Moreover, laid-off manufacturing high-tech workers who found a new job saw a very steep decline in earnings. This decline in earnings was well above the declines registered among any other groups of laid-off workers, including workers who were laid off during the "jobless recovery" of the 1990s. Among laid-off high-tech workers who found a new job, about four out of five did not locate employment in high-tech, and about one out of three moved to another city. In Ottawa-Gatineau, many former high-tech employees found jobs in the federal government. However, about two in five laid-off high-tech workers left the city.

    Release date: 2007-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019621
    Description:

    Advances in science, medical research and information and communications technologies (ICTs) are bringing about significant economic and societal transformations, the full impacts of which are only beginning to emerge. Canada's ICT sector, comprised of both manufacturing and service industries, e industries, is one of several important players in the strategy towards improving the country's innovation performance. In particular, the ICT service industries are leading the way in terms of economic growth and innovative activity.

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019625
    Description:

    In 2005, only 6% of Canadian firms sold goods online. Even though 43% of firms made purchases online, it appears that the majority of firms are still having difficulties adapting their business to the online environment or are simply choosing not to do so. In order for Canadian electronic commerce to continue its growth, it is important to identify the barriers and explore what firm characteristics, such as size and sector, may influence these barriers.

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019624
    Description:

    The Internet has changed the way many Canadians conduct their everyday activities, from viewing weather, news and sports to banking and paying bills. It has also changed the way many shop. In 2005, Canadians placed almost 50 million online orders valued at $7.9 billion. However, many of these orders were made by a relatively small group of people. In fact, Canada's top online spenders represented fewer than 7% of adult Canadians and accounted for three-quarters of total online expenditures to consumers. Who are these Canadians and what are they buying?

    Release date: 2007-05-10

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: