Statistics by subject – Information and communications technology

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All (12)

All (12) (12 of 12 results)

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2008003
    Description:

    Canadians were early adopters of broadband Internet services, and Canada continues to lead the G7 group of industrialized countries in broadband penetration. In 2003, approximately 65% of Canadian households with home Internet connections had broadband connections, a number that increased to 81% in 2005. It is assumed that the high adoption rates reflect a population that is well-prepared to use the Internet to access education, health, government, business and entertainment services. However, the adoption of broadband alone is not a panacea for users. How the broadband connection is used is critical to understanding impacts. By analyzing Statistics Canada's Household Internet Use Survey (HIUS) data, this paper makes the case that not all broadband households are the same. It demonstrates that understanding how often and for what purposes Canadian households are using their broadband connections allows for a fuller examination of Internet usage than simply measuring broadband access rates. As the data will show, broadband access does not imply full usage of broadband services. This study identifies differences within broadband households, and explains why it is important to recognize the differences in their usage behaviours.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Journals and periodicals: 56F0004M
    Description:

    The Connectedness series publishes analytical studies as well as research reports in the broad area of connectedness. This includes the industrial areas of telecommunications, broadcasting, computer services and Internet Service Providers as well as cross economy activities such as the Internet and electronic commerce. It offers a statistical perspective in these emerging phenomena that are changing the economic and societal landscape of the country.

    All papers are subject to peer and institutional review as well as review by subject matter experts, as necessary.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2008016
    Description:

    The Internet's rapid and profound entry into our lives quite understandably makes people wonder how, both individually and collectively, we have been affected by it. When major shifts in technology use occur, utopian and dystopian views of their impact on society often abound, reflecting their disruptiveness and people's concerns. Given its complex uses, the Internet, both as a technology and as an environment, has had both beneficial and deleterious effects. Above all, though, it has had transformative effects.

    Are Canadians becoming more isolated, more reclusive and less integrated in their communities as they use the Internet? Or, are they becoming more participatory and more integrated in their communities? In addition, do these communities still resemble traditional communities, or are they becoming more like social networks than cohesive groups?

    To address these questions, this article organizes, analyzes and presents existing Canadian evidence. It uses survey results and research amassed by Statistics Canada and the Connected Lives project in Toronto to explore the role of the Internet in social engagement and the opportunities it represents for Canadians to be active citizens. It finds that Internet users are at least as socially engaged as non-users. They have large networks and frequent interactions with friends and family, although they tend to spend somewhat less in-person time and, of course, more time online. An appreciable number of Internet users are civically and politically engaged, using the Internet to find out about opportunities and make contact with others.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71-585-X
    Description:

    This compendium provides data from the new Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) conducted by Statistics Canada with the support of Human Resources Development Canada. The survey consists of two components: (1) a workplace survey on the adoption of technologies, organizational change, training and other human resource practices, business strategies, and labour turnover in workplaces; and (2) a survey of employees within these same workplaces covering wages, hours of work, job type, human capital, use of technologies and training. The result is a rich new source of linked information on workplaces and their employees.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Table: Summary table
    Release date: 2008-09-18

  • Table: 56-001-X200800110653
    Description:

    This publication presents financial and operating statistics for telecommunications services industries, except the Cable and Other Program Distribution industry.

    Release date: 2008-09-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110597
    Description:

    Internet use is a key hallmark of an information society. Assessing Internet use today goes beyond access to encompass a cluster of behaviours that reflect the individual's ability to participate productively in an information economy. This study compares the pattern of Internet use of Canadians working in the information and communications technology industries with that of other Canadians.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2008001
    Description:

    This study compares the characteristics of innovative exporting firms using formal intellectual property (IP) regimes and those using informal intellectual property regimes. Two service industry groups are examined: Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and Selected Professional, Scientific and Technical Services. The data are based on the 2003 Survey of Innovation

    Release date: 2008-02-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008018
    Description:

    This paper examines the presence of knowledge spillovers that affect the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It examines whether plants that adopt advanced technologies are more likely to do so when there are other nearby plants that do so within a model of technology adoption.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

Data (5)

Data (5) (5 of 5 results)

Analysis (4)

Analysis (4) (4 of 4 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 56F0004M
    Description:

    The Connectedness series publishes analytical studies as well as research reports in the broad area of connectedness. This includes the industrial areas of telecommunications, broadcasting, computer services and Internet Service Providers as well as cross economy activities such as the Internet and electronic commerce. It offers a statistical perspective in these emerging phenomena that are changing the economic and societal landscape of the country.

    All papers are subject to peer and institutional review as well as review by subject matter experts, as necessary.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2008016
    Description:

    The Internet's rapid and profound entry into our lives quite understandably makes people wonder how, both individually and collectively, we have been affected by it. When major shifts in technology use occur, utopian and dystopian views of their impact on society often abound, reflecting their disruptiveness and people's concerns. Given its complex uses, the Internet, both as a technology and as an environment, has had both beneficial and deleterious effects. Above all, though, it has had transformative effects.

    Are Canadians becoming more isolated, more reclusive and less integrated in their communities as they use the Internet? Or, are they becoming more participatory and more integrated in their communities? In addition, do these communities still resemble traditional communities, or are they becoming more like social networks than cohesive groups?

    To address these questions, this article organizes, analyzes and presents existing Canadian evidence. It uses survey results and research amassed by Statistics Canada and the Connected Lives project in Toronto to explore the role of the Internet in social engagement and the opportunities it represents for Canadians to be active citizens. It finds that Internet users are at least as socially engaged as non-users. They have large networks and frequent interactions with friends and family, although they tend to spend somewhat less in-person time and, of course, more time online. An appreciable number of Internet users are civically and politically engaged, using the Internet to find out about opportunities and make contact with others.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110597
    Description:

    Internet use is a key hallmark of an information society. Assessing Internet use today goes beyond access to encompass a cluster of behaviours that reflect the individual's ability to participate productively in an information economy. This study compares the pattern of Internet use of Canadians working in the information and communications technology industries with that of other Canadians.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008018
    Description:

    This paper examines the presence of knowledge spillovers that affect the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It examines whether plants that adopt advanced technologies are more likely to do so when there are other nearby plants that do so within a model of technology adoption.

    Release date: 2008-02-05

Reference (3)

Reference (3) (3 results)

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2008003
    Description:

    Canadians were early adopters of broadband Internet services, and Canada continues to lead the G7 group of industrialized countries in broadband penetration. In 2003, approximately 65% of Canadian households with home Internet connections had broadband connections, a number that increased to 81% in 2005. It is assumed that the high adoption rates reflect a population that is well-prepared to use the Internet to access education, health, government, business and entertainment services. However, the adoption of broadband alone is not a panacea for users. How the broadband connection is used is critical to understanding impacts. By analyzing Statistics Canada's Household Internet Use Survey (HIUS) data, this paper makes the case that not all broadband households are the same. It demonstrates that understanding how often and for what purposes Canadian households are using their broadband connections allows for a fuller examination of Internet usage than simply measuring broadband access rates. As the data will show, broadband access does not imply full usage of broadband services. This study identifies differences within broadband households, and explains why it is important to recognize the differences in their usage behaviours.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71-585-X
    Description:

    This compendium provides data from the new Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) conducted by Statistics Canada with the support of Human Resources Development Canada. The survey consists of two components: (1) a workplace survey on the adoption of technologies, organizational change, training and other human resource practices, business strategies, and labour turnover in workplaces; and (2) a survey of employees within these same workplaces covering wages, hours of work, job type, human capital, use of technologies and training. The result is a rich new source of linked information on workplaces and their employees.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2008001
    Description:

    This study compares the characteristics of innovative exporting firms using formal intellectual property (IP) regimes and those using informal intellectual property regimes. Two service industry groups are examined: Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and Selected Professional, Scientific and Technical Services. The data are based on the 2003 Survey of Innovation

    Release date: 2008-02-29

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