Statistics by subject – Information and communications technology

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Analysis (13)

Analysis (13) (13 of 13 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-11-26

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-10-28

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-01-30

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2008016
    Description:

    The Internet's rapid and profound entry into our lives quite understandably makes people wonder how, both individually and collectively, we have been affected by it. When major shifts in technology use occur, utopian and dystopian views of their impact on society often abound, reflecting their disruptiveness and people's concerns. Given its complex uses, the Internet, both as a technology and as an environment, has had both beneficial and deleterious effects. Above all, though, it has had transformative effects.

    Are Canadians becoming more isolated, more reclusive and less integrated in their communities as they use the Internet? Or, are they becoming more participatory and more integrated in their communities? In addition, do these communities still resemble traditional communities, or are they becoming more like social networks than cohesive groups?

    To address these questions, this article organizes, analyzes and presents existing Canadian evidence. It uses survey results and research amassed by Statistics Canada and the Connected Lives project in Toronto to explore the role of the Internet in social engagement and the opportunities it represents for Canadians to be active citizens. It finds that Internet users are at least as socially engaged as non-users. They have large networks and frequent interactions with friends and family, although they tend to spend somewhat less in-person time and, of course, more time online. An appreciable number of Internet users are civically and politically engaged, using the Internet to find out about opportunities and make contact with others.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2007015
    Description:

    The 2005 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) included a module of questions on the extent and reasons for which Canadians use the Internet to connect with all levels of government - federal, provincial and municipal. This study examines the patterns of use for government online information and services among adult Canadians. A profile of government online users is developed in order to compare them with other Internet users and with non-users on the basis of various socio-demographic and Internet use characteristics. Concerns about Internet privacy and security are examined as potential barriers to the use of government online services. Finally, a multivariate logistic regression model helps to disentangle the various factors influencing the use of the Internet for government online activities.

    Release date: 2007-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007003
    Description:

    This study investigates factors that influence Internet use with an emphasis on rural areas and small towns.

    Release date: 2007-09-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-508-X
    Description:

    This volume is Statistics Canada's second compendium publication on the subject of information and communications technologies (ICTs) in Canada. It builds on the material provided in our first compendium publication, Networked Canada: Beyond the information highway, as well as the ongoing Connectedness Series. It also goes one step further by representing a comprehensive compilation of measurements and analyses from diverse areas across the Agency. It traces the evolution of our economy and highlights many facets of our society's transformation.

    Part 1 offers a profile of Canada's ICT sector, including key indicators of change. Changes occurring in individual industries that supply ICT goods and services are also analysed.

    Part 2 addresses economy-wide issues (including health, education and justice) from a sectoral approach, covering ICT diffusion and utilization among business, households and governments.

    Part 3 offers a collection of thematic analyses focussing on topical issues of the Information Society. These include the high-tech labour market, information technology (IT) occupations, the digital divide, telecommunications services, broadband use and deployment, and the use of ICTs by cultural industries.

    Part 4 examines Canada's international involvement in the Information Society. Contributions from policy departments offer an account of the Canadian role in promoting a global Information Society, with particular emphasis on assistance to developing countries.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2003010
    Description:

    This paper quantifies the demand for and supply of broadband Internet technologies in Canada. It also examines broadband investment, supply and availability.

    Release date: 2003-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2002007
    Description:

    This paper looks at the digital divide, commonly understood as the gap between information and communications technology (ICT) 'haves' and 'have-nots.' It examines the many variables, including income, education, age and geographical location, that exert significant influences on household penetration of both ICT and non-ICT commodities.

    Release date: 2002-10-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-504-X
    Description:

    Networked Canada is the first comprehensive compendium to be published by Statistics Canada on the information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. The compendium has been designed as a profile of the information society, focusing on current trends, as well as an historical overview of the growth and development of the Canadian ICT sector industries. The publication contains two main parts. The first provides a statistical overview of the ICT sector on the basis of key economic variables, including production, employment, international trade, revenue and R&D expenditure. A summary of international ICT sector comparisons for selected variables, using recent data published by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) is also included here. The ever widening use of, and access to ICTs in the home, at work, in schools and by governments is examined in the second part.

    Many different data sources have been used throughout the project, and while all efforts have been made to maximize the amount of data available, it has not been possible in all instances to consistently report for all ICT industries and all relevant variables. The conversion to the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) has largely contributed to these difficulties, and it is expected that a greater range of data will be available once all of the survey programs begin reporting on the basis of this new industry classification.

    Release date: 2001-04-27

  • Journals and periodicals: 56F0006X
    Description:

    Using the 2000 General Social Survey data on individual Internet use, this paper explores the use of the Internet, and its social impact on Canadians. During the year 2000, an estimated 13 million, or 53% of Canadians over 15 years of age, said they used the Internet at home, work or somewhere else in the last 12 months. Most non-users say cost and access are their greatest barriers to the Internet. The majority of Canadians feel everyone should have access to the Internet, but they are divided about who should remove the barriers

    Release date: 2001-03-26

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2001003
    Description:

    This paper looks at how Canadians use the Internet for shopping, how much Canadians spend on Internet shopping by province, and which countries are receiving the money.

    Release date: 2001-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2000001
    Description:

    This study looks at the number of Canadians logging onto the Internet by province and geographical area, time spent on the Internet, uses of this new medium, education and income.

    Release date: 2001-01-15

Reference (3)

Reference (3) (3 results)

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2010002
    Description:

    This paper investigates the intensity and scope of Internet usage among individual Canadians, based on data from the 2005 and 2007 Canadian Internet Use Surveys (CIUS). It profiles various aspects of online behaviour and analyzes the 2007 findings to examine patterns of scope of Internet use by user characteristics. Multivariate analyses are applied to explore the relationships among Internet use behaviour and characteristics such as age, sex, income, and education.

    In addition to the shift from dial-up to high-speed Internet access that has been occurring among Canadian Internet users, the 2005 to 2007 period also saw a slight increase in the proportion of users who were online daily and for at least five hours per week. While this proportion is growing, fewer than 50% of Canadian Internet users were characterized as high intensity users in 2005 and 2007. Among individuals with high-speed connections, the low intensity users continued to outnumber the high intensity ones, challenging the notion that access to a high speed connection leads to intensive Internet usage. Among Internet users, age, income, sex, and years of online experience were all associated with the propensity to engage in online activities and to use the Internet intensively. The finding that experienced Internet users do use the Internet in more extensive ways underscores the importance of studying the nature of Internet users as they gain more experience.

    Release date: 2010-03-31

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2009005
    Description:

    Before the Internet was launched commercially, few people outside the scientific and academic worlds were aware of this new technology. Commerce has since changed in unimaginable ways and it is now possible to search, purchase and sell just about anything over the Internet. Using data from Statistics Canada's Internet use surveys, this research examines the data, trends and patterns in Canadian online shopping from 2001 to 2007.

    Release date: 2009-12-15

  • Index and guides: 56M0002G
    Description:

    This guide is for the Household Internet Use Survey microdata file. The Household Internet Use Survey is being conducted by Statistics Canada on behalf of Industry Canada. The information from this survey will assist the Science and Technology Redesign Project at Statistics Canada to fulfil a three-year contractual agreement between them and the Telecommunications and Policy Branch of Industry Canada. The Household Internet Use Survey is a voluntary survey. It will provide information on the use of computers for communication purposes, and households' access and use of the Internet from home.

    The objective of this survey is to measure the demand for telecommunications services by Canadian households. To assess the demand, we measure the frequency and intensity of use of what is commonly referred to as "the information highway" among other things. This was done by asking questions relating to the accessibility of the Internet to Canadian households both at home, the workplace and a number of other locations. The information collected will be used to update and expand upon previous studies done by Statistics Canada on the topic of the Information Highway.

    Release date: 2004-09-28

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