Statistics by subject – Information and communications technology

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All (3)

All (3) (3 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-01-30

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2008016
    Description:

    The Internet's rapid and profound entry into our lives quite understandably makes people wonder how, both individually and collectively, we have been affected by it. When major shifts in technology use occur, utopian and dystopian views of their impact on society often abound, reflecting their disruptiveness and people's concerns. Given its complex uses, the Internet, both as a technology and as an environment, has had both beneficial and deleterious effects. Above all, though, it has had transformative effects.

    Are Canadians becoming more isolated, more reclusive and less integrated in their communities as they use the Internet? Or, are they becoming more participatory and more integrated in their communities? In addition, do these communities still resemble traditional communities, or are they becoming more like social networks than cohesive groups?

    To address these questions, this article organizes, analyzes and presents existing Canadian evidence. It uses survey results and research amassed by Statistics Canada and the Connected Lives project in Toronto to explore the role of the Internet in social engagement and the opportunities it represents for Canadians to be active citizens. It finds that Internet users are at least as socially engaged as non-users. They have large networks and frequent interactions with friends and family, although they tend to spend somewhat less in-person time and, of course, more time online. An appreciable number of Internet users are civically and politically engaged, using the Internet to find out about opportunities and make contact with others.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2006013
    Description:

    This study aims to develop a better understanding of the social impacts associated with Internet use in Canada. Although much work has been accomplished on the penetration and use of the Internet, this study uses data from the General Social Survey, Cycle 19: Time Use to better understand how personal use of the Internet fits in the day-to-day lives of Canadians.

    The survey provides a time-diary account of respondent activities over a 24-hour period, enabling detailed comparisons among heavy Internet users, moderate users, and non-Internet users and their time allocation decisions. Heavy Internet users spent more time alone during the diary day than non-Internet users, even when compared to people of the same social and demographic background. Although they spent less time with family and friends, many heavy Internet users participated in online activities involving social interaction, such as email or chatting with others.

    Release date: 2006-08-02

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Analysis (3)

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  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-01-30

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2008016
    Description:

    The Internet's rapid and profound entry into our lives quite understandably makes people wonder how, both individually and collectively, we have been affected by it. When major shifts in technology use occur, utopian and dystopian views of their impact on society often abound, reflecting their disruptiveness and people's concerns. Given its complex uses, the Internet, both as a technology and as an environment, has had both beneficial and deleterious effects. Above all, though, it has had transformative effects.

    Are Canadians becoming more isolated, more reclusive and less integrated in their communities as they use the Internet? Or, are they becoming more participatory and more integrated in their communities? In addition, do these communities still resemble traditional communities, or are they becoming more like social networks than cohesive groups?

    To address these questions, this article organizes, analyzes and presents existing Canadian evidence. It uses survey results and research amassed by Statistics Canada and the Connected Lives project in Toronto to explore the role of the Internet in social engagement and the opportunities it represents for Canadians to be active citizens. It finds that Internet users are at least as socially engaged as non-users. They have large networks and frequent interactions with friends and family, although they tend to spend somewhat less in-person time and, of course, more time online. An appreciable number of Internet users are civically and politically engaged, using the Internet to find out about opportunities and make contact with others.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2006013
    Description:

    This study aims to develop a better understanding of the social impacts associated with Internet use in Canada. Although much work has been accomplished on the penetration and use of the Internet, this study uses data from the General Social Survey, Cycle 19: Time Use to better understand how personal use of the Internet fits in the day-to-day lives of Canadians.

    The survey provides a time-diary account of respondent activities over a 24-hour period, enabling detailed comparisons among heavy Internet users, moderate users, and non-Internet users and their time allocation decisions. Heavy Internet users spent more time alone during the diary day than non-Internet users, even when compared to people of the same social and demographic background. Although they spent less time with family and friends, many heavy Internet users participated in online activities involving social interaction, such as email or chatting with others.

    Release date: 2006-08-02

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