Statistics by subject – Aboriginal language groups

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  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017035
    Description:

    Based on 2016 Census data, the following infographic provides a portrait of Aboriginal languages in Canada, including mother tongue and languages spoken at home.

    Release date: 2017-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017027
    Description:

    Based on 2016 Census data, the following infographic provides a portrait of the Aboriginal population in Canada, including age, growth, population count and the diversity of Aboriginal languages.

    Release date: 2017-10-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-655-X
    Description:

    Many of the 60 or so Aboriginal languages in Canada are considered endangered to varying degrees for their long-term survival. Assessing language vitality or endangerment through the measurement of various factors can provide useful information to help ensure the continuity of a language. This paper illustrates how the 2011 Census of Population and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) can be used to measure some of the factors that provide information related to the vitality of Aboriginal languages.

    Release date: 2014-10-16

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-10-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211336
    Description:

    This study analyses data from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey to identify some of the characteristics associated with the ability to understand an Aboriginal language among off-reserve First Nations children aged 2 to 5. More specifically, it examines the extent to which the home, the extended family, child care settings, and the broader community can contribute to the transmission of Aboriginal languages to young First Nations children living off reserve.

    Release date: 2010-09-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-644-X
    Description:

    This document of fact sheets provides an early learning profile of Métis, Inuit, and off-reserve First Nations children under the age of six in Canada. The 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey is used to provide broad indicators of young Aboriginal children's experiences with learning. Data include how they learn about words and traditional activities and who helps them learn. Family characteristics associated with participation in early learning activities are also presented.

    Release date: 2010-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-644-X201000111281
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides an early learning profile of Inuit children under the age of six in Canada. The 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey is used to provide broad indicators of young Inuit children's experiences with learning. Data include how they learn about words and traditional activities and who helps them learn. Family characteristics associated with participation in early learning activities are also presented.

    Release date: 2010-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-644-X201000111279
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides an early learning profile of off-reserve First Nations children under the age of six in Canada. The 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey is used to provide broad indicators of young off-reserve First Nations children's experiences with learning. Data include how they learn about words and traditional activities and who helps them learn. Family characteristics associated with participation in early learning activities are also presented.

    Release date: 2010-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-644-X201000111280
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides an early learning profile of Métis children under the age of six in Canada. The 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey is used to provide broad indicators of young Métis children's experiences with learning. Data include how they learn about words and traditional activities and who helps them learn. Family characteristics associated with participation in early learning activities are also presented.

    Release date: 2010-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111142
    Description:

    Métis peoples make up one third of the Aboriginal population in Canada (about 390,000 people in 2006). Using the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (15 and older) and Métis Supplement this article explores various cultural activities of the Métis population. More specifically, it considers involvement in traditional activities, such as: arts and crafts, hunting, fishing, trapping, and gathering wild vegetation. It also explores Aboriginal language use, involvement in Métis-specific organizations, and spiritual and religious practices. Findings are presented by sex, age, and region.

    Release date: 2010-04-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-634-X
    Description:

    The Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) provides an extensive set of data about Aboriginal (Métis, Inuit, and off-reserve First Nations) children under 6 years of age in urban, rural, and northern locations across Canada. The Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) was designed to provide a picture of the early development of Aboriginal children and the social and living conditions in which they are learning and growing.

    The survey was developed by Statistics Canada and Aboriginal advisors from across the country and was conducted jointly with Human Resources and Social Development Canada.

    Release date: 2009-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110769
    Description:

    This article offers a brief demographic and socio-economic profile of the people who reported Métis as their Aboriginal identity in the 2006 Census of Population. It discusses the growth of the Métis population over the decade 1996-2006 as well as reports on their housing conditions, languages, education, labour force and earnings.

    Release date: 2009-01-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200900110780
    Description:

    Despite more stable annual growth since 2002, there has been no reduction in the volatility of monthly changes in GDP. Partly this reflects the increasing importance of industries such as resources and construction where output is more unstable.

    Release date: 2009-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800210712
    Description:

    This article offers a brief demographic and socio-economic profile of Inuit, based on results of the 2006 Census of Population. Inuit living in Inuit Nunaat (Inuit homeland) are compared to those living outside Inuit Nunaat. Direct links are provided to Statistics Canada website containing a series of data tables for readers wanting more detailed information.

    Release date: 2008-11-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008002
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Métis history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for Métis children under six years of age.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008003
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families, living with grandparents), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand First Nations history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for First Nations children under six years of age living off reserve.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008004
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, adoption, living with grandparents), housing conditions (crowding, dwellings in need of major repairs, levels of satisfaction with housing conditions), feelings about community (facilities), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Inuit history and culture, cultural activities in child care). Results are presented for all Inuit children. Some results are also presented for those in Inuit Nunaat (meaning Inuit homeland): Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X200800410724
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, adoption, living with grandparents), housing conditions (crowding, dwellings in need of major repairs, levels of satisfaction with housing conditions), feelings about community (facilities), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Inuit history and culture, cultural activities in child care). Results are presented for all Inuit children. Some results are also presented for those in Inuit Nunaat (meaning Inuit homeland): Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X200800310723
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families, living with grandparents), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand First Nations history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for First Nations children under 6 years of age living off reserve.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X200800210722
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Métis history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for Métis children under six years of age.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008001
    Description:

    Using data from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and the 2006 Census, this paper examines the topics of family, community, and child care of Aboriginal (off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit) children under six years of age. The paper explores issues such as family characteristics (size of families, age of parents, living with grandparents, persons involved in raising young Aboriginal children, Aboriginal children living in low-income economic families), feelings about community, cultural activities and child care arrangements. It is designed as a starting point to understanding the social and living conditions in which young Aboriginal children are learning and growing. The report is divided into three parts: First Nations children living off reserve, Métis children, and Inuit children.

    Release date: 2008-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008005
    Description:

    A series of supporting data tables accompany the analytical article from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS). These supporting data tables provide data at the provincial/regional level for Aboriginal, off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children under 6 years old for major themes covered in the analytical article: How often the child talks or plays together with different people, focusing attention on each other for five minutes or more; Feelings about home and daily life (housing conditions; support network from family, friends, or others; main job or activity; way spend free time; finances); Feelings about community (as a place with good schools, nursery schools and early childhood education programs; as a place with adequate facilities for children for example, community centres, rinks, gyms, parks; as a safe community; as a place with health facilities; as a place with actively involved members of the community; as a place with First Nations, Métis and Inuit cultural activities); Child care arrangements (percentage of children in child care; percentage of children in a child care arrangement that provides learning opportunities; percentage of children in a child care arrangement that promotes traditional and cultural values and customs); and, Percentage of children living in low-income families.

    Release date: 2008-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070069980
    Description:

    The labour force participation rate will inevitably decline over the next two decades. This reflects the retirement of the boomer generation and a low birth rate in recent years. Various scenarios involving increased immigration and keeping older workers in the labour force longer can mitigate but not reverse these trends

    Release date: 2007-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060059589
    Description:

    In an increasingly knowledge-based economy, the key to equity in economic opportunity lies in equity in access to a university education. Attending university is a costly undertaking. One aspect of the costs is distance, for the many who do not live within commuting distance of a university. Using census data, a new study looks at the impact the creation of seven new universities : in British Columbia, Newfoundland and Nova Scotia : in the last 25 years has had on university attendance of local youth. The impact is positive, but not shared equally among all youth.

    Release date: 2007-02-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070029586
    Description:

    A guide to the pitfalls of using the federal sector of the Provincial Accounts in assessing which provinces benefit the most from federal activities.

    Release date: 2007-02-15

Reference (2)

Reference (2) (2 results)

  • Index and guides: 98-200-X2016010
    Description:

    This article in the Census in Brief series paints a picture of linguistic diversity in Canada using statistics on Aboriginal and immigrant languages. It also presents different attributes of multilingualism and the place of official languages in Canada.

    Release date: 2017-08-02

  • Index and guides: 97-555-P2006003
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following demographic variables: First official language spoken, Home language, Knowledge of non-official languages, Knowledge of official languages, Language of work, and Mother tongue.

    Provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2006 Census. Each guide contains definitions and explanations on census concepts. Additional information will be included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the census.

    Release date: 2008-01-09

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