Statistics by subject – Population and demography

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All (14)

All (14) (14 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114345
    Description:

    This article analyzes the impact of immigration on the size and ethnocultural composition of future cohorts of seniors in Canada, using data from the Population Estimates Program, the Population Projections Program and other sources of demographic data.

    Release date: 2016-03-09

  • Table: 98-310-X201100311622
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look at relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The three articles linked to the population and dwelling counts release are entitled 'Population growth in Canada: From 1851 to 2061,' 'Canada's rural population since 1851' and 'The census: A tool for planning at the local level.'

    Release date: 2012-02-08

  • Table: 98-310-X201100311620
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look at relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The three articles linked to the population and dwelling counts release are entitled 'Population growth in Canada: From 1851 to 2061,' 'Canada's rural population since 1851' and 'The census: A tool for planning at the local level.'

    Release date: 2012-02-08

  • Table: 98-310-X201100311623
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look at relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The three articles linked to the population and dwelling counts release are entitled 'Population growth in Canada: From 1851 to 2061,' 'Canada's rural population since 1851' and 'The census: A tool for planning at the local level.'

    Release date: 2012-02-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900210919
    Description:

    This article examines whether access to maternity and paternity benefits influences a couple's decision to have a child. We identify characteristics of people who are most likely to say that benefits would transform intentions into behaviour.

    Release date: 2009-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X200400010665
    Description:

    In this article, the authors analyze the migration flows of Canadians between 2001 and 2006 using the 2006 Census data. First, the major internal migration movements are described at various geographic levels. The results can show certain phenomena that have marked the 2001-2006 intercensal period, such as the overall decline in mobility, the attraction exercised by Alberta, the urban expansion and the outflow of young people from rural areas. Second, various migrant characteristics are examined using a multivariate statistical model including several types of destination. The results help better understand the socio-demographic characteristics associated with mobility status, such as age, marital status, education, family structure or immigrant status.

    Release date: 2008-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110574
    Description:

    In order to celebrate Québec City's 400th birthday, this article is about the city's evolution, but also about the circumstances revolving around the censuses from the early beginnings up until now. The article looks at the census' history and at the data that emerged from it over the past four centuries.

    Release date: 2008-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009188
    Description:

    The visible minority population is growing rapidly in Canada and accounts for an increasing proportion of the birth rate. How do the various visible minority groups in Canada's population differ from one another with respect to fertility? The study shows that fertility is higher for visible minority women as a group than for the rest of the population, that fertility varies appreciably from one visible minority group to another, and that removing the effects of the groups' socio-economic characteristics, including religious denomination, does not eliminate fertility differentials.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009189
    Description:

    The purpose of this article is firstly to describe the importance of the immigration from the Balkan region and to answer the following question: do immigrants from the Balkans form a population that differs in socioeconomic terms from other immigrants and the host population? An analysis of the flows of newcomers to Canada show that the number of immigrants from the Balkan region has increased rapidly from 1993-1994 due to a large increase in the number of refugees coming from the countries that emerged from the former Yugoslavia. From 1994 to 2000, an important proportion of refugees admitted to Canada came from the Balkan region. In the 2001 Census, some 220 000 immigrants from the Balkans were enumerated. Results also show that, overall, immigrants from the Balkan region are different from the others immigrants in Canada and from the Canadian population: they are more concentrated geographically and their likehood of having an university degree is higher.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038968
    Description:

    This article uses Statistics Canada's most recent population projections for visible minority groups to draw a picture of the possible ethnocultural composition of the country when Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary in 2017. It focuses on a number of issues: How many Canadians might belong to a visible minority group in the near future? How many landed immigrants might there be? What are the predominant visible minority groups likely to be? Is diversity likely to remain concentrated in Canada's major urban centres?

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017941
    Description:

    We live in an aging society. And much has been written about how care will be provided to an aging population. We can't stop aging, and our capacity to affect our health as we age is limited, but the size, quality and proximity of people's social networks are arguably among the things that determine whether seniors receive formal care delivered by professionals, rely on informal care provided by family and friends or, indeed, receive no care at all.

    In this article, we look at the relationship between the social networks of non-institutionalized seniors and whether they receive formal, informal or no care.

    Release date: 2005-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047776
    Description:

    The years leading up to retirement may confront people with new challenges as well as opportunities. In addition to health, finances and several other factors, family relationships in general and satisfaction with marriage in particular greatly influence couples' experience of these years.

    This article uses data from the 2001 and 1995 General Social Surveys (GSS) to examine older couples' (aged 50 to 74 years) perceptions of their relationship during retirement or the years leading to retirement. Specifically, the analysis looks at couples' employment or retirement status, each individual's relative contribution to household income and the presence of adult children in the home as they relate to the quality of their relationship.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20030026807
    Description:

    The pattern of suicide among immigrants is closer to that in their countries of birth than to that of the Canadian-born population. Suicide rates of immigrants are about half those of the Canadian-born. Among immigrants, suicide rates increase with age, but among people born in Canada, rates are highest in middle age.

    Release date: 2004-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990034790
    Description:

    This article compares some selected indicators of psychological and social well-being for married seniors in poor health with those for seniors in good health. It also examines whether the well-being of partners is affected by their spouse's health.

    Release date: 1999-12-09

Data (3)

Data (3) (3 results)

  • Table: 98-310-X201100311622
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look at relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The three articles linked to the population and dwelling counts release are entitled 'Population growth in Canada: From 1851 to 2061,' 'Canada's rural population since 1851' and 'The census: A tool for planning at the local level.'

    Release date: 2012-02-08

  • Table: 98-310-X201100311620
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look at relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The three articles linked to the population and dwelling counts release are entitled 'Population growth in Canada: From 1851 to 2061,' 'Canada's rural population since 1851' and 'The census: A tool for planning at the local level.'

    Release date: 2012-02-08

  • Table: 98-310-X201100311623
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look at relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The three articles linked to the population and dwelling counts release are entitled 'Population growth in Canada: From 1851 to 2061,' 'Canada's rural population since 1851' and 'The census: A tool for planning at the local level.'

    Release date: 2012-02-08

Analysis (11)

Analysis (11) (11 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114345
    Description:

    This article analyzes the impact of immigration on the size and ethnocultural composition of future cohorts of seniors in Canada, using data from the Population Estimates Program, the Population Projections Program and other sources of demographic data.

    Release date: 2016-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900210919
    Description:

    This article examines whether access to maternity and paternity benefits influences a couple's decision to have a child. We identify characteristics of people who are most likely to say that benefits would transform intentions into behaviour.

    Release date: 2009-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X200400010665
    Description:

    In this article, the authors analyze the migration flows of Canadians between 2001 and 2006 using the 2006 Census data. First, the major internal migration movements are described at various geographic levels. The results can show certain phenomena that have marked the 2001-2006 intercensal period, such as the overall decline in mobility, the attraction exercised by Alberta, the urban expansion and the outflow of young people from rural areas. Second, various migrant characteristics are examined using a multivariate statistical model including several types of destination. The results help better understand the socio-demographic characteristics associated with mobility status, such as age, marital status, education, family structure or immigrant status.

    Release date: 2008-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110574
    Description:

    In order to celebrate Québec City's 400th birthday, this article is about the city's evolution, but also about the circumstances revolving around the censuses from the early beginnings up until now. The article looks at the census' history and at the data that emerged from it over the past four centuries.

    Release date: 2008-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009188
    Description:

    The visible minority population is growing rapidly in Canada and accounts for an increasing proportion of the birth rate. How do the various visible minority groups in Canada's population differ from one another with respect to fertility? The study shows that fertility is higher for visible minority women as a group than for the rest of the population, that fertility varies appreciably from one visible minority group to another, and that removing the effects of the groups' socio-economic characteristics, including religious denomination, does not eliminate fertility differentials.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009189
    Description:

    The purpose of this article is firstly to describe the importance of the immigration from the Balkan region and to answer the following question: do immigrants from the Balkans form a population that differs in socioeconomic terms from other immigrants and the host population? An analysis of the flows of newcomers to Canada show that the number of immigrants from the Balkan region has increased rapidly from 1993-1994 due to a large increase in the number of refugees coming from the countries that emerged from the former Yugoslavia. From 1994 to 2000, an important proportion of refugees admitted to Canada came from the Balkan region. In the 2001 Census, some 220 000 immigrants from the Balkans were enumerated. Results also show that, overall, immigrants from the Balkan region are different from the others immigrants in Canada and from the Canadian population: they are more concentrated geographically and their likehood of having an university degree is higher.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038968
    Description:

    This article uses Statistics Canada's most recent population projections for visible minority groups to draw a picture of the possible ethnocultural composition of the country when Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary in 2017. It focuses on a number of issues: How many Canadians might belong to a visible minority group in the near future? How many landed immigrants might there be? What are the predominant visible minority groups likely to be? Is diversity likely to remain concentrated in Canada's major urban centres?

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017941
    Description:

    We live in an aging society. And much has been written about how care will be provided to an aging population. We can't stop aging, and our capacity to affect our health as we age is limited, but the size, quality and proximity of people's social networks are arguably among the things that determine whether seniors receive formal care delivered by professionals, rely on informal care provided by family and friends or, indeed, receive no care at all.

    In this article, we look at the relationship between the social networks of non-institutionalized seniors and whether they receive formal, informal or no care.

    Release date: 2005-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047776
    Description:

    The years leading up to retirement may confront people with new challenges as well as opportunities. In addition to health, finances and several other factors, family relationships in general and satisfaction with marriage in particular greatly influence couples' experience of these years.

    This article uses data from the 2001 and 1995 General Social Surveys (GSS) to examine older couples' (aged 50 to 74 years) perceptions of their relationship during retirement or the years leading to retirement. Specifically, the analysis looks at couples' employment or retirement status, each individual's relative contribution to household income and the presence of adult children in the home as they relate to the quality of their relationship.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20030026807
    Description:

    The pattern of suicide among immigrants is closer to that in their countries of birth than to that of the Canadian-born population. Suicide rates of immigrants are about half those of the Canadian-born. Among immigrants, suicide rates increase with age, but among people born in Canada, rates are highest in middle age.

    Release date: 2004-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990034790
    Description:

    This article compares some selected indicators of psychological and social well-being for married seniors in poor health with those for seniors in good health. It also examines whether the well-being of partners is affected by their spouse's health.

    Release date: 1999-12-09

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Reference (0) (0 results)

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