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All (7)

All (7) (7 of 7 results)

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201700114793
    Description:

    This article examines mortality in Canada primarily for the year 2012 and 2013 including infant mortality, the probability of dying and life expectancy for males and females.

    Release date: 2017-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114316
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada examines many aspects related to senior women in Canada including their socio-demographic characteristics, life expectancy, living arrangements, social participation, Internet use, health, assistance with daily living and leading causes of death, as well as economic characteristics including their labour force participation and income. The focus will be on recent patterns, with discussion of historical trends where appropriate, including selected analysis by ethnocultural diversity and geographic region.

    Release date: 2016-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200111618
    Description:

    The age and other characteristics of emigrants who return to Canada may have social and economic implications - particularly with respect to transfer programs for seniors. This study uses census data to address several questions related to Canadian residents who previously emigrated to other countries: Do seniors account for a large proportion of returned emigrants? From where do older emigrants return? Do the characteristics of older returned emigrants differ from those of older Canadians who did not live abroad? Do the amounts and sources of income received in old age differ between these groups? How do all these results differ for the Canadian-born versus immigrant returnees?

    Release date: 2012-01-30

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007452
    Description:

    The report examines income and low income in census metropolitan areas between 1980 and 2000. It examines the situation of families and the neighbourhoods they live in. It also examines the situation of recent immigrants, Aboriginal people and lone-parent family members.

    Median pre-tax income rose in virtually all Canadian census metropolitan areas (CMAs) over the 1980 to 2000 period. Incomes increased at both the top and bottom of the income distribution, but tended to rise faster at the top. In nearly all cities, income increased faster in the higher income neighbourhoods - measured at the census tract (CT) level - than it did in lower income neighbourhoods. The incidence of low income was at similar levels in 1980 and 2000, but the demographic composition of low income changed, reflecting rising low-income rates among some 'at-risk' groups, as well as demographic changes in the CMA. By 2000, recent immigrants comprised more of the low-income population, and a greater share of the residents in low-income neighbourhoods than they did in 1980. Recent immigrants had much higher low-income rates in 2000 than in 1980. In 2000, Aboriginal people and people in single-parent families had much higher low-income rates than others and were over-represented in low-income neighbourhoods. The share of income that low-income families received from government transfers rose over the period. The location of low-income neighbourhoods changed in some CMAs, reflecting a decline in low-income neighbourhoods in the city centre and a rise in low-income neighbourhoods in more suburban areas.

    The report examines before-tax income in CMAs using the 1981, 1986, 1991, 1996 and 2001 censuses of Canada.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005750
    Description:

    In the present research, our aims are to trace the emergence of the "blended family" (the term generally employed to describe stepfamilies with a common child), exploring which features of stepfamilies make them most susceptible to become blended families, and to assess how being born into a stepfamily affects the family experience and subsequent life course of the growing number of children involved.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013572
    Description:

    The inspiration and content of this volume owe much to Larry Kotlikoff, Alan Auerbach and their collaborators for their pioneering work in the development of Generational Accounting. These papers include the latest efforts to apply their accounting framework to Canada as well as numerous extensions of parallel thinking to a far broader range of legacies. Both of these lines of research make use of Statistics Canada's unmatched sources of data and analytical capacities, so the sponsorship and content of this book make a natural match.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013565
    Description:

    A clear understanding of the size and extent of intergenerational transfers made by governments is central to any informed debate dealing with "Intergenerational Equity." Accordingly, the aim of this chapter is to provide a descriptive backdrop to these discussions by examining how current policy at all levels of government in Canada redistributes income among the different generations.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013572
    Description:

    The inspiration and content of this volume owe much to Larry Kotlikoff, Alan Auerbach and their collaborators for their pioneering work in the development of Generational Accounting. These papers include the latest efforts to apply their accounting framework to Canada as well as numerous extensions of parallel thinking to a far broader range of legacies. Both of these lines of research make use of Statistics Canada's unmatched sources of data and analytical capacities, so the sponsorship and content of this book make a natural match.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013565
    Description:

    A clear understanding of the size and extent of intergenerational transfers made by governments is central to any informed debate dealing with "Intergenerational Equity." Accordingly, the aim of this chapter is to provide a descriptive backdrop to these discussions by examining how current policy at all levels of government in Canada redistributes income among the different generations.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

Analysis (4)

Analysis (4) (4 of 4 results)

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201700114793
    Description:

    This article examines mortality in Canada primarily for the year 2012 and 2013 including infant mortality, the probability of dying and life expectancy for males and females.

    Release date: 2017-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114316
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada examines many aspects related to senior women in Canada including their socio-demographic characteristics, life expectancy, living arrangements, social participation, Internet use, health, assistance with daily living and leading causes of death, as well as economic characteristics including their labour force participation and income. The focus will be on recent patterns, with discussion of historical trends where appropriate, including selected analysis by ethnocultural diversity and geographic region.

    Release date: 2016-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200111618
    Description:

    The age and other characteristics of emigrants who return to Canada may have social and economic implications - particularly with respect to transfer programs for seniors. This study uses census data to address several questions related to Canadian residents who previously emigrated to other countries: Do seniors account for a large proportion of returned emigrants? From where do older emigrants return? Do the characteristics of older returned emigrants differ from those of older Canadians who did not live abroad? Do the amounts and sources of income received in old age differ between these groups? How do all these results differ for the Canadian-born versus immigrant returnees?

    Release date: 2012-01-30

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005750
    Description:

    In the present research, our aims are to trace the emergence of the "blended family" (the term generally employed to describe stepfamilies with a common child), exploring which features of stepfamilies make them most susceptible to become blended families, and to assess how being born into a stepfamily affects the family experience and subsequent life course of the growing number of children involved.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007452
    Description:

    The report examines income and low income in census metropolitan areas between 1980 and 2000. It examines the situation of families and the neighbourhoods they live in. It also examines the situation of recent immigrants, Aboriginal people and lone-parent family members.

    Median pre-tax income rose in virtually all Canadian census metropolitan areas (CMAs) over the 1980 to 2000 period. Incomes increased at both the top and bottom of the income distribution, but tended to rise faster at the top. In nearly all cities, income increased faster in the higher income neighbourhoods - measured at the census tract (CT) level - than it did in lower income neighbourhoods. The incidence of low income was at similar levels in 1980 and 2000, but the demographic composition of low income changed, reflecting rising low-income rates among some 'at-risk' groups, as well as demographic changes in the CMA. By 2000, recent immigrants comprised more of the low-income population, and a greater share of the residents in low-income neighbourhoods than they did in 1980. Recent immigrants had much higher low-income rates in 2000 than in 1980. In 2000, Aboriginal people and people in single-parent families had much higher low-income rates than others and were over-represented in low-income neighbourhoods. The share of income that low-income families received from government transfers rose over the period. The location of low-income neighbourhoods changed in some CMAs, reflecting a decline in low-income neighbourhoods in the city centre and a rise in low-income neighbourhoods in more suburban areas.

    The report examines before-tax income in CMAs using the 1981, 1986, 1991, 1996 and 2001 censuses of Canada.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

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