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All (8)

All (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M1997004
    Description:

    The estimation of the population by age, sex and marital status for each province is a difficult task, principally because of migration. The characteristics of migrants are available only from responses to the census. Until 1991, the census included only the question on place of residence five years ago. Thus, a person who had a different residence five years earlier was considered as a migrant and was attributed the characteristics reported for him/her at the time of the census. However, the respondent had up to five years to change characteristics, particularly those relating to marital status.

    Since 1991, the census has asked a question on the place of residence one year ago. The same procedure attributes to the migrant the characteristics reported one year earlier, but this time there is only one year to change them.The article describes, in some detail, the methods now used by Statistics Canada to estimate the characteristics of migrants and evaluates the advantages of using the data on place of residence one year ago.

    Release date: 1997-12-23

  • Table: 93F0023X
    Description:

    The Nation is the first series to release basic data from the 1996 Census, providing national coverage. This series covers characteristics of the population, including demographic, social, cultural, labour force and income variables as well as details on dwellings, households and families. Generally the data are represented for Canada, Provinces, Territories and Census Metropolitan Areas. Some tables include comparisons with data from earlier censuses.

    Release date: 1997-11-04

  • Table: 93F0022X
    Description:

    The Nation is the first series to release basic data from the 1996 Census, providing national coverage. This series covers characteristics of the population, including demographic, social, cultural, labour force and income variables as well as details on dwellings, households and families. Generally the data are represented for Canada, Provinces, Territories and Census Metropolitan Areas. Some tables include comparisons with data from earlier censuses.

    Release date: 1997-10-14

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M1997003
    Description:

    For historical reasons, the best known life tables and those most often used are period tables. They are built using death rates by age for a short period of observation (often a single year) and have as their purpose to represent the status of mortality for this period. The survivors and deaths appearing in their columns are in a way abstractions rather than reality. It is thus erroneous to believe that the life table for a given year (for example, 1995) serves in any way whatever to predict the rate at which those born that year will pass away and, hence, of the average length of the life that they have just begun. With rare exceptions, the average number of years lived by individuals has always been longer than the life expectancy found in the life table constructed for the year of their birth. This is due to the fact that period tables are established using the risks of death by age prevailing in that year. But the ceaseless battle against death reduces these risks year after year for these ages and, by growing older, people benefit from these successive gains.

    To reconstitute (or foresee) the rate at which the members of a cohort have (or will) really pass away, it is necessary to deploy very long series of death rates by age and to possess reliable indicators of missing data, and then to adjust them to establish the actual experience of the persons in a cohort. Built in exactly the same way as period tables, these tables are naturally called cohort tables, but comparing observations of their parameters yields conclusions of a different kind.

    Release date: 1997-10-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19970033208
    Description:

    On February 20 and 21, 1997, Statistics Canada hosted the conference, "Intergenerational Equity in Canada." This report presents a brief overview of the concepts and issues associatedwith "equity" between and within generations, summarizing selected conference presentations.

    Release date: 1997-09-10

  • Table: 93F0021X
    Description:

    This is the first set of data in The Nation series released from the 1996 Census, providing national coverage. These cover characteristics of the population on age and sex. Generally the data are represented for Canada, Provinces, Territories and Census Metropolitan Areas. Some tables include comparisons with data from earlier censuses.

    Release date: 1997-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19970013091
    Description:

    This article attempts to determine how the future retirement of elementary and secondary school teachers will affect the hiring of new teachers, given the aging of the teaching force. Using socio-demographic analysis, future requirements for new teachers are determined according to three scenarios regarding retirement age, namely, retirement at age 55, 60 or 65, assuming that the pupil-teacher ratio will remain constant. At present, budget cuts are forcing some educational institutions to reduce their teaching staff, but in a few years, when teachers currently on staff retire, the situation could improve. What, then, will be the hiring prospects in the field of education in the future? This analysis is based on data from the October 1995 Labour Force Survey. It also focuses on the situation facing managers in the education sector, for they will have to decide how to handle the demand for teachers. In addition, the findings may assist young people in choosing their careers.

    Release date: 1997-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19960004869
    Description:

    This report, using data on common-law unions from the censuses and the most recent General Social Surveys, presents an update of our knowledge on the number and characteristics of people who choose to live in common-law unions. As a report, it remains incomplete, and represents but a few more pages in a continuing story.

    Release date: 1997-03-25

Data (3)

Data (3) (3 results)

  • Table: 93F0023X
    Description:

    The Nation is the first series to release basic data from the 1996 Census, providing national coverage. This series covers characteristics of the population, including demographic, social, cultural, labour force and income variables as well as details on dwellings, households and families. Generally the data are represented for Canada, Provinces, Territories and Census Metropolitan Areas. Some tables include comparisons with data from earlier censuses.

    Release date: 1997-11-04

  • Table: 93F0022X
    Description:

    The Nation is the first series to release basic data from the 1996 Census, providing national coverage. This series covers characteristics of the population, including demographic, social, cultural, labour force and income variables as well as details on dwellings, households and families. Generally the data are represented for Canada, Provinces, Territories and Census Metropolitan Areas. Some tables include comparisons with data from earlier censuses.

    Release date: 1997-10-14

  • Table: 93F0021X
    Description:

    This is the first set of data in The Nation series released from the 1996 Census, providing national coverage. These cover characteristics of the population on age and sex. Generally the data are represented for Canada, Provinces, Territories and Census Metropolitan Areas. Some tables include comparisons with data from earlier censuses.

    Release date: 1997-07-29

Analysis (5)

Analysis (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M1997004
    Description:

    The estimation of the population by age, sex and marital status for each province is a difficult task, principally because of migration. The characteristics of migrants are available only from responses to the census. Until 1991, the census included only the question on place of residence five years ago. Thus, a person who had a different residence five years earlier was considered as a migrant and was attributed the characteristics reported for him/her at the time of the census. However, the respondent had up to five years to change characteristics, particularly those relating to marital status.

    Since 1991, the census has asked a question on the place of residence one year ago. The same procedure attributes to the migrant the characteristics reported one year earlier, but this time there is only one year to change them.The article describes, in some detail, the methods now used by Statistics Canada to estimate the characteristics of migrants and evaluates the advantages of using the data on place of residence one year ago.

    Release date: 1997-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M1997003
    Description:

    For historical reasons, the best known life tables and those most often used are period tables. They are built using death rates by age for a short period of observation (often a single year) and have as their purpose to represent the status of mortality for this period. The survivors and deaths appearing in their columns are in a way abstractions rather than reality. It is thus erroneous to believe that the life table for a given year (for example, 1995) serves in any way whatever to predict the rate at which those born that year will pass away and, hence, of the average length of the life that they have just begun. With rare exceptions, the average number of years lived by individuals has always been longer than the life expectancy found in the life table constructed for the year of their birth. This is due to the fact that period tables are established using the risks of death by age prevailing in that year. But the ceaseless battle against death reduces these risks year after year for these ages and, by growing older, people benefit from these successive gains.

    To reconstitute (or foresee) the rate at which the members of a cohort have (or will) really pass away, it is necessary to deploy very long series of death rates by age and to possess reliable indicators of missing data, and then to adjust them to establish the actual experience of the persons in a cohort. Built in exactly the same way as period tables, these tables are naturally called cohort tables, but comparing observations of their parameters yields conclusions of a different kind.

    Release date: 1997-10-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19970033208
    Description:

    On February 20 and 21, 1997, Statistics Canada hosted the conference, "Intergenerational Equity in Canada." This report presents a brief overview of the concepts and issues associatedwith "equity" between and within generations, summarizing selected conference presentations.

    Release date: 1997-09-10

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19970013091
    Description:

    This article attempts to determine how the future retirement of elementary and secondary school teachers will affect the hiring of new teachers, given the aging of the teaching force. Using socio-demographic analysis, future requirements for new teachers are determined according to three scenarios regarding retirement age, namely, retirement at age 55, 60 or 65, assuming that the pupil-teacher ratio will remain constant. At present, budget cuts are forcing some educational institutions to reduce their teaching staff, but in a few years, when teachers currently on staff retire, the situation could improve. What, then, will be the hiring prospects in the field of education in the future? This analysis is based on data from the October 1995 Labour Force Survey. It also focuses on the situation facing managers in the education sector, for they will have to decide how to handle the demand for teachers. In addition, the findings may assist young people in choosing their careers.

    Release date: 1997-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19960004869
    Description:

    This report, using data on common-law unions from the censuses and the most recent General Social Surveys, presents an update of our knowledge on the number and characteristics of people who choose to live in common-law unions. As a report, it remains incomplete, and represents but a few more pages in a continuing story.

    Release date: 1997-03-25

Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

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