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All (18)

All (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200611113175
    Description:

    Just as the responsibility of raising children is lifting, many families are facing a new challenge providing care to aging parents, relatives or friends. The intensity of work and eldercare can affect the work life balance of the caregiver. An examination of the prevalence and impact of caregiving among those aged 45 to 64, looking at the hours spent on both paid work and informal care of seniors.

    Release date: 2006-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060059528
    Description:

    This article presents information about access to transportation by different age groups; then, it discusses the impact of having either more or less access to transportation on seniors' activities and quality of life. Finally, the article examines the characteristics of those seniors who are most likely to have limited access to transportation, and are thus most likely to face restrictions in their everyday activities.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006288
    Description:

    This paper exploits the unique strengths of the tax-based Longitudinal Administrative Database to measure the flows of Canadians to other countries and the patterns of return over the period from 1982 to 2003. Overall, approximately 0.1% (i.e., one tenth of 1%) of the adult population leaves the country in any given year. Departure rates have generally moved with the state of the Canadian economy, but the trends have clearly been driven by more than this: declining in the 1980s as the economy was going well; turning up towards the end of the decade, but before the economy began to stall in 1989; rising through the early part of the 1990s as the economy was mired in a deep recession, but then continuing to rise through 1997, by which time a strong recovery was underway; and then declining sharply since 2000-thus stemming what many had thought was an inexorable upwards trend-when economic factors were fairly stable. Departure rates decline with age (except for the youngest group); are lower for couples without children than other family types; are high for those in British Columbia, quite low for Francophone Quebecers, and very high for Anglophones in that province; are somewhat lower for those on Employment Insurance (formerly Unemployment Insurance) and substantially higher for those at higher-income levels; and are very much higher for recent immigrants. Departure rates for those at higher-income levels shifted upwards in the 1990s, but returned to pre-1990s rates in more recent years in the case of men, while the shift was maintained for women. Only a minority of those who leave ever return: about 15% within 5 years of their departure. Return rates have, however, increased significantly since 2000-mirroring to a large extent what was happening on the departure side.

    Release date: 2006-11-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20060029294
    Description:

    This newsletter article presents results from a population-based study of birth outcomes in Quebec from 1991 to 2000. Rates of adverse birth outcomes increased across successively poorer neighbourhood income groups, and across successively lower levels of maternal education, for five outcomes: preterm birth, small-for-gestational-age birth, stillbirth, neonatal death, and postneonatal death.

    Release date: 2006-09-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006048
    Description:

    This study analyzes drug sales by type of retailer between 1998 and 2005. The analysis focuses on the competition between pharmacies, food stores and general merchandise stores. Retail sales of drugs in Canada are also compared with those of the United States. The main source of data is the Quarterly Retail Commodity Survey.

    Release date: 2006-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2006010
    Description:

    This report paints a statistical portrait of socio-economic conditions in the Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) of Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver. It highlights trends in population growth, suburban growth, commuting, employment, unemployment, immigration, income and low-income and socio-economic conditions among immigrants, Aboriginal People, and others. It uses data from the 1981 to 2001 Censuses of Canada, the 2005 Labour Force Historical Review, and Income in Canada, 2004.

    Release date: 2006-07-20

  • Classification: 82-225-X20060099205
    Description:

    The Death Clearance Overview document describes the Death Clearance module of the Canadian Cancer Registry, its structure, its function and its role in the operation of the national cancer registry. Inputs and outputs are listed and briefly described, as well as the different steps constituting the Death Clearance process.

    Release date: 2006-07-07

  • Public use microdata: 95M0020X
    Description:

    This file provides data on households and housing. The 2001 Census Public Use Microdata Files (PUMFs) contain samples of anonymous responses to the 2001 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses. Three files are available: the Individuals File, the Families File, and the Households and Housing File. Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. The user can group and manipulate these variables to suit data and research requirements. Tabulations excluded from other census products can be created or relationships between variables can be analysed using different statistical tests. These files provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people. Most of the census subject matter is included in the microdata files. For the anonymity of respondents, geographic identifiers have been restricted to provinces, territories and large metropolitan areas.

    Note:This product will be released in 2 phases, Phase 1 (release May 17, 2006) and Phase 2 (released June 30, 2006).Phase 1 will contain the following: (1) the data file (2) portions of the user documentation (3) the SAS and SPSS code.

    Phase 2 will contain the COMPLETE product, including the following additional information: (1) conversion factors(2) tools used to measure the quality (3) a users' guide which provides step-by-step instructions on how to use the Quality application.

    Clients who have purchased Phase 1 of this product will automatically receive Phase 2, the complete product.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009189
    Description:

    The purpose of this article is firstly to describe the importance of the immigration from the Balkan region and to answer the following question: do immigrants from the Balkans form a population that differs in socioeconomic terms from other immigrants and the host population? An analysis of the flows of newcomers to Canada show that the number of immigrants from the Balkan region has increased rapidly from 1993-1994 due to a large increase in the number of refugees coming from the countries that emerged from the former Yugoslavia. From 1994 to 2000, an important proportion of refugees admitted to Canada came from the Balkan region. In the 2001 Census, some 220 000 immigrants from the Balkans were enumerated. Results also show that, overall, immigrants from the Balkan region are different from the others immigrants in Canada and from the Canadian population: they are more concentrated geographically and their likehood of having an university degree is higher.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009188
    Description:

    The visible minority population is growing rapidly in Canada and accounts for an increasing proportion of the birth rate. How do the various visible minority groups in Canada's population differ from one another with respect to fertility? The study shows that fertility is higher for visible minority women as a group than for the rest of the population, that fertility varies appreciably from one visible minority group to another, and that removing the effects of the groups' socio-economic characteristics, including religious denomination, does not eliminate fertility differentials.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Public use microdata: 95M0016X
    Description:

    This file provides data on the characteristics of the population. The 2001 Census Public Use Microdata Files (PUMFs) contain samples of anonymous responses to the 2001 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses. Three files are available: the Individuals File, the Families File, and the Households and Housing File.

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. The PUMFs user can group and manipulate these variables to suit data and research requirements. Tabulations excluded from other census products can be created or relationships between variables can be analysed using different statistical tests. PUMFs provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    Most of the subject matter covered by the census is included in the microdata files. To ensure the respondents' anonymity, geographic identifiers have been restricted to provinces/territories and large metropolitan areas.

    Note: Please be advised that errors have been detected in the data for two variables contained on the revised version of this CD-ROM. As well, we have added a unique record identifier called PPSORT, built/included in the file for administrative purposes only.The affected variables are:Income status (2000 low income cut-offs) (INCSTP)Ethnic origin (ETHNICRA)Further details can be found in the "Errata" file offered in several formats on the new, re-issued CD-ROM.Original release date - February 8, 20051rst Correction - released August 24, 20052nd Correction - released April 26, 2006

    Release date: 2006-04-26

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-618-X
    Description:

    The purpose of the provincial and territorial reports is to present a summary of demographic, social and economic characteristics of the off reserve Aboriginal population in the Atlantic provinces, Québec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Columbia, Yukon and Northwest Territories. Information on education, residential schools, information technology, employment, mobility and housing, health and language are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided, as are some comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2001 Census and the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2006-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S2005000
    Description:

    Health at Older Ages is the sixth report in the Statistics Canada series How Healthy Are Canadians? It contains four articles. Analysis is based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey, the National Population Health Survey, and the Hospital Morbidity Database.

    Healthy living among seniors explores good health in relation to health behaviours and psychosocial factors. The components of good health are presented for the senior population by age group and by sex. The article looks at the importance of health behaviours such as exercise, alcohol consumption, diet and smoking, as well stress and community belonging. The effect of healthy behaviours over time is also assessed.

    Dependency, chronic conditions and pain in seniors estimates the prevalence of dependency in the population aged 65 or older by age group and by the presence of specific chronic conditions. The analysis focuses on how the relationship between dependency and chronic conditions is affected when pain is also considered.

    Seniors' health care use provides estimates of the proportions of seniors who consulted medical professionals, took various types of medication, were hospitalized and received home care services. Associations between health status and the use of these forms of health care is examined. The relationship between the use of health care and socio-economic status is also considered.

    Successful aging in health care institutions explores factors associated with positive self-perceived health among seniors who live in health care institutions. Prevalence rates of positive self-perceived health are estimated and characteristics associated with it are identified. As well, factors related to death among institutional residents over a six-year period are analysed.

    Predictors of death in seniors updates information on the leading cause of death for people aged 65 or older, and examines factors associated with death in seniors over an eight-year period. The analysis focuses on psychosocial factors (psychological distress, financial and family stress) in relation to mortality.

    Release date: 2006-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20060019097
    Description:

    This newsletter article presents estimates of the population health impact of cancer in Canada, based on cancer incidence and mortality in 2001. Cancer has a substantial impact in terms of both mortality and morbidity, and a considerable amount of this impact is attributable to modifiable risk factors. These results provide a more comprehensive picture of how cancer affects the Canadian population. This is part of the Population Health Impact of Disease in Canada (PHI) research program.

    Release date: 2006-03-07

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006273
    Description:

    Recent immigration appears to be characterized by frequent return and onward migration. This has important consequences for the contribution of immigrants to the economy of the host country. The return to host country settlement costs may be very low for some immigrants. Lack of longitudinal data has prevented much analysis of whether recent international migration is more like internal migration and not a once-for-all move with a possible return should the move prove to have been a mistake. A newly available longitudinal data set covering all immigrants to Canada since 1980 provides the opportunity to address the issues raised by the new migration. The results show that a large fraction of immigrants, especially among skilled workers and entrepreneurs, are highly internationally mobile.

    Release date: 2006-03-01

  • Public use microdata: 89M0020X
    Description:

    The Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) provides data on the social and economic conditions of Aboriginal people in Canada. Its specific purpose was to identify the needs of Aboriginal people focusing on issues such as health, language, employment, income, schooling, housing, and mobility. The survey was designed and implemented in partnership with national Aboriginal organizations.

    This product contains information for the Aboriginal adult population (15 years and over) living in off-reserve areas.

    Release date: 2006-02-28

  • Public use microdata: 95M0018X
    Description:

    This file provides data on family composition in Canada.

    The 2001 Census Public Use Microdata Files (PUMFs) contain samples of anonymous responses to the 2001 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses. Three files are available: the Individuals File, the Families File, and the Households and Housing File.

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. The user can group and manipulate these variables to suit data and research requirements. Tabulations excluded from other census products can be created or relationships between variables can be analysed using different statistical tests. These files provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    Most of the census subject matter is included in the microdata files. For the anonymity of respondents, geographic identifiers have been restricted to provinces, territories and large metropolitan areas.

    Release date: 2006-02-21

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005006
    Description:

    This bulletin groups watersheds according to the share of their population that is designated as "census rural" in order to profile the rural versus urban demographic structure of watersheds across Canada.

    Release date: 2006-01-05

Data (4)

Data (4) (4 of 4 results)

  • Public use microdata: 95M0020X
    Description:

    This file provides data on households and housing. The 2001 Census Public Use Microdata Files (PUMFs) contain samples of anonymous responses to the 2001 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses. Three files are available: the Individuals File, the Families File, and the Households and Housing File. Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. The user can group and manipulate these variables to suit data and research requirements. Tabulations excluded from other census products can be created or relationships between variables can be analysed using different statistical tests. These files provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people. Most of the census subject matter is included in the microdata files. For the anonymity of respondents, geographic identifiers have been restricted to provinces, territories and large metropolitan areas.

    Note:This product will be released in 2 phases, Phase 1 (release May 17, 2006) and Phase 2 (released June 30, 2006).Phase 1 will contain the following: (1) the data file (2) portions of the user documentation (3) the SAS and SPSS code.

    Phase 2 will contain the COMPLETE product, including the following additional information: (1) conversion factors(2) tools used to measure the quality (3) a users' guide which provides step-by-step instructions on how to use the Quality application.

    Clients who have purchased Phase 1 of this product will automatically receive Phase 2, the complete product.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Public use microdata: 95M0016X
    Description:

    This file provides data on the characteristics of the population. The 2001 Census Public Use Microdata Files (PUMFs) contain samples of anonymous responses to the 2001 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses. Three files are available: the Individuals File, the Families File, and the Households and Housing File.

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. The PUMFs user can group and manipulate these variables to suit data and research requirements. Tabulations excluded from other census products can be created or relationships between variables can be analysed using different statistical tests. PUMFs provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    Most of the subject matter covered by the census is included in the microdata files. To ensure the respondents' anonymity, geographic identifiers have been restricted to provinces/territories and large metropolitan areas.

    Note: Please be advised that errors have been detected in the data for two variables contained on the revised version of this CD-ROM. As well, we have added a unique record identifier called PPSORT, built/included in the file for administrative purposes only.The affected variables are:Income status (2000 low income cut-offs) (INCSTP)Ethnic origin (ETHNICRA)Further details can be found in the "Errata" file offered in several formats on the new, re-issued CD-ROM.Original release date - February 8, 20051rst Correction - released August 24, 20052nd Correction - released April 26, 2006

    Release date: 2006-04-26

  • Public use microdata: 89M0020X
    Description:

    The Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) provides data on the social and economic conditions of Aboriginal people in Canada. Its specific purpose was to identify the needs of Aboriginal people focusing on issues such as health, language, employment, income, schooling, housing, and mobility. The survey was designed and implemented in partnership with national Aboriginal organizations.

    This product contains information for the Aboriginal adult population (15 years and over) living in off-reserve areas.

    Release date: 2006-02-28

  • Public use microdata: 95M0018X
    Description:

    This file provides data on family composition in Canada.

    The 2001 Census Public Use Microdata Files (PUMFs) contain samples of anonymous responses to the 2001 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses. Three files are available: the Individuals File, the Families File, and the Households and Housing File.

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. The user can group and manipulate these variables to suit data and research requirements. Tabulations excluded from other census products can be created or relationships between variables can be analysed using different statistical tests. These files provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    Most of the census subject matter is included in the microdata files. For the anonymity of respondents, geographic identifiers have been restricted to provinces, territories and large metropolitan areas.

    Release date: 2006-02-21

Analysis (13)

Analysis (13) (13 of 13 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200611113175
    Description:

    Just as the responsibility of raising children is lifting, many families are facing a new challenge providing care to aging parents, relatives or friends. The intensity of work and eldercare can affect the work life balance of the caregiver. An examination of the prevalence and impact of caregiving among those aged 45 to 64, looking at the hours spent on both paid work and informal care of seniors.

    Release date: 2006-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060059528
    Description:

    This article presents information about access to transportation by different age groups; then, it discusses the impact of having either more or less access to transportation on seniors' activities and quality of life. Finally, the article examines the characteristics of those seniors who are most likely to have limited access to transportation, and are thus most likely to face restrictions in their everyday activities.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006288
    Description:

    This paper exploits the unique strengths of the tax-based Longitudinal Administrative Database to measure the flows of Canadians to other countries and the patterns of return over the period from 1982 to 2003. Overall, approximately 0.1% (i.e., one tenth of 1%) of the adult population leaves the country in any given year. Departure rates have generally moved with the state of the Canadian economy, but the trends have clearly been driven by more than this: declining in the 1980s as the economy was going well; turning up towards the end of the decade, but before the economy began to stall in 1989; rising through the early part of the 1990s as the economy was mired in a deep recession, but then continuing to rise through 1997, by which time a strong recovery was underway; and then declining sharply since 2000-thus stemming what many had thought was an inexorable upwards trend-when economic factors were fairly stable. Departure rates decline with age (except for the youngest group); are lower for couples without children than other family types; are high for those in British Columbia, quite low for Francophone Quebecers, and very high for Anglophones in that province; are somewhat lower for those on Employment Insurance (formerly Unemployment Insurance) and substantially higher for those at higher-income levels; and are very much higher for recent immigrants. Departure rates for those at higher-income levels shifted upwards in the 1990s, but returned to pre-1990s rates in more recent years in the case of men, while the shift was maintained for women. Only a minority of those who leave ever return: about 15% within 5 years of their departure. Return rates have, however, increased significantly since 2000-mirroring to a large extent what was happening on the departure side.

    Release date: 2006-11-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20060029294
    Description:

    This newsletter article presents results from a population-based study of birth outcomes in Quebec from 1991 to 2000. Rates of adverse birth outcomes increased across successively poorer neighbourhood income groups, and across successively lower levels of maternal education, for five outcomes: preterm birth, small-for-gestational-age birth, stillbirth, neonatal death, and postneonatal death.

    Release date: 2006-09-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006048
    Description:

    This study analyzes drug sales by type of retailer between 1998 and 2005. The analysis focuses on the competition between pharmacies, food stores and general merchandise stores. Retail sales of drugs in Canada are also compared with those of the United States. The main source of data is the Quarterly Retail Commodity Survey.

    Release date: 2006-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2006010
    Description:

    This report paints a statistical portrait of socio-economic conditions in the Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) of Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver. It highlights trends in population growth, suburban growth, commuting, employment, unemployment, immigration, income and low-income and socio-economic conditions among immigrants, Aboriginal People, and others. It uses data from the 1981 to 2001 Censuses of Canada, the 2005 Labour Force Historical Review, and Income in Canada, 2004.

    Release date: 2006-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009189
    Description:

    The purpose of this article is firstly to describe the importance of the immigration from the Balkan region and to answer the following question: do immigrants from the Balkans form a population that differs in socioeconomic terms from other immigrants and the host population? An analysis of the flows of newcomers to Canada show that the number of immigrants from the Balkan region has increased rapidly from 1993-1994 due to a large increase in the number of refugees coming from the countries that emerged from the former Yugoslavia. From 1994 to 2000, an important proportion of refugees admitted to Canada came from the Balkan region. In the 2001 Census, some 220 000 immigrants from the Balkans were enumerated. Results also show that, overall, immigrants from the Balkan region are different from the others immigrants in Canada and from the Canadian population: they are more concentrated geographically and their likehood of having an university degree is higher.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009188
    Description:

    The visible minority population is growing rapidly in Canada and accounts for an increasing proportion of the birth rate. How do the various visible minority groups in Canada's population differ from one another with respect to fertility? The study shows that fertility is higher for visible minority women as a group than for the rest of the population, that fertility varies appreciably from one visible minority group to another, and that removing the effects of the groups' socio-economic characteristics, including religious denomination, does not eliminate fertility differentials.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-618-X
    Description:

    The purpose of the provincial and territorial reports is to present a summary of demographic, social and economic characteristics of the off reserve Aboriginal population in the Atlantic provinces, Québec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Columbia, Yukon and Northwest Territories. Information on education, residential schools, information technology, employment, mobility and housing, health and language are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided, as are some comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2001 Census and the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2006-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S2005000
    Description:

    Health at Older Ages is the sixth report in the Statistics Canada series How Healthy Are Canadians? It contains four articles. Analysis is based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey, the National Population Health Survey, and the Hospital Morbidity Database.

    Healthy living among seniors explores good health in relation to health behaviours and psychosocial factors. The components of good health are presented for the senior population by age group and by sex. The article looks at the importance of health behaviours such as exercise, alcohol consumption, diet and smoking, as well stress and community belonging. The effect of healthy behaviours over time is also assessed.

    Dependency, chronic conditions and pain in seniors estimates the prevalence of dependency in the population aged 65 or older by age group and by the presence of specific chronic conditions. The analysis focuses on how the relationship between dependency and chronic conditions is affected when pain is also considered.

    Seniors' health care use provides estimates of the proportions of seniors who consulted medical professionals, took various types of medication, were hospitalized and received home care services. Associations between health status and the use of these forms of health care is examined. The relationship between the use of health care and socio-economic status is also considered.

    Successful aging in health care institutions explores factors associated with positive self-perceived health among seniors who live in health care institutions. Prevalence rates of positive self-perceived health are estimated and characteristics associated with it are identified. As well, factors related to death among institutional residents over a six-year period are analysed.

    Predictors of death in seniors updates information on the leading cause of death for people aged 65 or older, and examines factors associated with death in seniors over an eight-year period. The analysis focuses on psychosocial factors (psychological distress, financial and family stress) in relation to mortality.

    Release date: 2006-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20060019097
    Description:

    This newsletter article presents estimates of the population health impact of cancer in Canada, based on cancer incidence and mortality in 2001. Cancer has a substantial impact in terms of both mortality and morbidity, and a considerable amount of this impact is attributable to modifiable risk factors. These results provide a more comprehensive picture of how cancer affects the Canadian population. This is part of the Population Health Impact of Disease in Canada (PHI) research program.

    Release date: 2006-03-07

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006273
    Description:

    Recent immigration appears to be characterized by frequent return and onward migration. This has important consequences for the contribution of immigrants to the economy of the host country. The return to host country settlement costs may be very low for some immigrants. Lack of longitudinal data has prevented much analysis of whether recent international migration is more like internal migration and not a once-for-all move with a possible return should the move prove to have been a mistake. A newly available longitudinal data set covering all immigrants to Canada since 1980 provides the opportunity to address the issues raised by the new migration. The results show that a large fraction of immigrants, especially among skilled workers and entrepreneurs, are highly internationally mobile.

    Release date: 2006-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005006
    Description:

    This bulletin groups watersheds according to the share of their population that is designated as "census rural" in order to profile the rural versus urban demographic structure of watersheds across Canada.

    Release date: 2006-01-05

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Classification: 82-225-X20060099205
    Description:

    The Death Clearance Overview document describes the Death Clearance module of the Canadian Cancer Registry, its structure, its function and its role in the operation of the national cancer registry. Inputs and outputs are listed and briefly described, as well as the different steps constituting the Death Clearance process.

    Release date: 2006-07-07

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