Statistics by subject – Human resources in science and technology

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Analysis (17)

Analysis (17) (17 of 17 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-07-27

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008017
    Description:

    This paper examines the growth of human capital in Canadian and U.S. cities. Using pooled Census of Population data for 242 urban centres, we evaluate the link between long run employment growth and the supply of different types of skilled labour. The paper also examines whether the scientific capabilities of cities are influenced by amenities such as the size of the local cultural sector.

    The first part of the paper investigates the contribution of broad and specialized forms of human capital to long-run employment growth. We differentiate between employed degree holders (a general measure of human capital) and degree holders employed in science and cultural occupations (specific measures of human capital). Our growth models investigate long-run changes in urban employment from 1980 to 2000, and control for other factors that have been posited to influence the growth of cities. These include estimates of the amenities that proxy differences in the attractiveness of urban areas.

    The second part of the paper focuses specifically on a particular type of human capital'degree holders in science and engineering occupations. Our models evaluate the factors associated with the medium- and long-run growth of these occupations. Particular attention is placed on disentangling the relationships between science and engineering growth and other forms of human capital.

    Release date: 2008-01-08

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210331
    Description:

    Highly qualified human resources in science and technology are vital for innovation and economic growth. Both are dependent on the stock of human capital which supplies the labour market with highly skilled workers and helps in the diffusion of advanced knowledge. This article profiles Canada's highly qualified personnel based on immigrant status and place of birth, field of study, and selected demographic and employment characteristics.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029242
    Description:

    There is a growing supply of scientists and engineers with doctorates in the natural and applied sciences occupation but, on the other hand, there is a potential for future shortages of university professors concludes a forthcoming Statistics Canada study entitled Where are the Scientists & Engineers? One reason for the lower replacement numbers for university professors is that PhDs may be turning away from educational services towards higher paying industries for employment.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006012
    Description:

    In recent years, cities have become increasingly interested in their ability to generate, attract and retain human capital. One measure of human capital is employment in science- and engineering-based occupations. This paper provides a comparison of the employment shares of these specialized occupations across Canadian and U.S. cities by using data from the Canadian and the U.S. censuses from 1980-1981 and 2000-2001. The paper, therefore, provides a perspective on how Canadian cities performed relative to their U.S. counterparts over a twenty-year period. It also seeks to evaluate how cities of different sizes have performed, because large cities may be advantaged over smaller cities in terms of factors influencing both the demand for, and supply of, scientists and engineers.

    Release date: 2006-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006011
    Description:

    This paper compares the size and composition of science and engineering employment in Canada and the United States. It examines the share of paid employment and paid earnings accounted for by the science and engineering workforce in both countries. Our tabulations distinguish between a core group and a related group of science and engineering workers. The core group includes computer and information scientists, life and related scientists, physical and related scientists, social and related scientists, and engineers. The related group includes workers in health-related occupations, science and engineering managers, science and engineering technologists and technicians, a residual class of other science and engineering workers, and post-secondary educators in science and engineering fields. We examine the employment and earnings shares of science and engineering workers over the 1980/1981 to 2000/2001 period. Detailed industry comparisons are reported for 2000/2001.

    Release date: 2006-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2005006
    Description:

    The growth in micro-technologies and their widespread diffusion across economic sectors have given rise to what is often described as a New Economy - an economy in which competitive prospects are closely aligned with the firm's innovation and technology practices, and its use of skilled workers. Training is one strategy that many firms undertake in order to improve the quality of their workforce.

    This study contributes to the expanding body of research in the area of information and communication technologies (ICT). Using data on business sector workplaces from the 1999 Workplace and Employee Survey (WES), we investigate factors related to the incidence and intensity of training. The study focuses on whether training incidence and training intensity are more closely associated with the technological competencies of specific workplaces than with membership in ICT and science-based industry environments. The study finds that training incidence depends more on the technological competencies exhibited by individual workplaces. Among workplaces that decide to train, these technological competencies are also important determinants of the intensity of training.

    Workplaces which score highly on our index of technological competency are over three times more likely to train than those that rank zero on the competency index. The size of the workplace is also a factor. Large and medium-sized workplaces are 3 and 2.3 times more likely to train than small workplaces, respectively. And workplaces with higher-skilled workforces are more likely to train than workplaces with lower-skilled workforces.

    For workplaces that choose to train, their technological competency is the main determinant of training intensity. The size of the workplace, the average cost of training, and the skill level of the workforce are also influential factors'but to a lesser extent. Other factors, such as sector, outside sources of funding, and unionization status, are not influential factors in determining the intensity of training. Workplaces that have a higher average cost of training train fewer employees as a proportion of their workforce. However, the skill level of their employees moderates this effect, because as payroll-per-employee increases (a proxy for worker skills), plants train more.

    Release date: 2005-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2004005
    Description:

    This study explores the information and communications technology (ICT) industries and science-based industries of Canada's knowledge economy.

    Release date: 2004-05-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2003003
    Description:

    This report compares employment growth in information and communications technology (ICT) industries and science-based industries across provinces, urban and rural regions and census metropolitan areas (CMAs).

    Release date: 2003-07-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016150
    Description:

    Given that science and technology skills are a high priority for maintaining Canada's competitive advantage in the new economy, the obvious question is: Where do S&T skills come from and how does Canada compare with other countries? Read the findings from a recent Statistics Canada study that examines the ins and outs of the science stream, starting in Grade 4 through to the workforce.

    Release date: 2002-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010016030
    Description:

    This article, the first of three, gives an overview of this study of the determinants of elementary and high school mathematics and science performance, the economic returns of adult literacy, and the diffusion of science and technology (S&T) graduates into the work force.

    Release date: 2001-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010016031
    Description:

    This article, the second of three, describes elementary and secondary school participation and performance in science and technology (S&T) courses.

    Release date: 2001-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001154
    Description:

    This paper examines the ways that innovation status as opposed to technology use affects the training activities of manufacturing plants. It examines training that is introduced as a response to specific skill shortages versus training that is implemented in response to the introduction of advanced equipment.

    Advanced technology users are more likely to have workers in highly skilled occupations, to face greater shortages for these workers, and they are more likely to train workers in response to these shortages than are plants that do not use advanced technologies.

    The introduction of new techniques is also accompanied by differences in the incidence of training, with advanced technology users being more likely to introduce training programs than non-users. Here, innovation status within the group of technology users also affects the training decision. In particular, innovating and non-innovating technology users diverge with regards to the extent and nature of training that is undertaken in response to the introduction of new advanced equipment. Innovators are more likely to provide training for this purpose and to prefer on-the-job training to other forms. Non-innovators are less likely to offer training under these circumstances and when they do, it is more likely to be done in a classroom, either off-site or at the firm.

    These findings emphasize that training occurs for more than one reason. Shortages related to insufficient supply provide one rational. But it is not here that innovative firms stand out. Rather they appear to respond differentially to the introduction of new equipment by extensively implementing training that is highly firm-specific. This suggests that innovation requires new skills that are not so much occupation specific (though that is no doubt present) but general cognitive skills that come from operating in an innovative environment that involves improving the problem-solving capabilities of many in the workforce. These problem-solving capabilities occur in a learning-by-doing setting with hands on experience.

    Release date: 2001-04-04

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20000025118
    Description:

    The number of personnel in scientific and technological (S&T) activities in the federal government has declined by 15% since 1990-1991.

    Release date: 2000-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 88F0017M1996003
    Description:

    This paper examines a number of significant changes (real or perceived) related to wages and earnings, in the Canadian context, since the recession of the early 1980s.

    Release date: 1998-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19970033624
    Description:

    The Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) was conducted by the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) in 1995. The largest and most ambitious study ever conducted under the auspices of IEA, TIMSS compared the teaching and learning of mathematics with the teaching and learning of science at the elementary and secondary school levels. Its aim was to inform educators around the world about exemplary instructional practices and student outcomes in mathematics and science.

    Release date: 1998-03-04

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