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All (248)

All (248) (25 of 248 results)

  • Articles and reports: 18-001-X2017001
    Description:

    This working paper profiles Canadian firms involved in the development and production of Bioproducts. It provides data on the number and types of Bioproducts firms in 2015, covering bioproducts revenues, research and development, use of biomass, patents, products, business practices and the impact of government regulations on the sector.

    Release date: 2017-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016063
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article highlights notable changes in the pace and composition of industrial research and development (R&D) spending in Canada during the 2000-to-2013 period. The analysis is based on historical time series data that conclude with the publication of estimates for reference year 2013. New data on industrial R&D will be released in the coming months. These new survey results begin with estimates for reference year 2014 and reflect conceptual and methodological changes designed to enhance the scope and relevance of the program. Following the introduction of these changes, a study on the break in the time series will be conducted later in 2017. his article highlights trends in industrial R&D spending in advance of the upcoming release of the new data. The analysis underscores the extent to which support for higher R&D spending in more recent years has come from resource-based companies.

    Release date: 2017-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016386
    Description:

    This paper asks whether research and development (R&D) drives the level of competitiveness required to successfully enter export markets and whether, in turn, participation in export markets increases R&D expenditures. Canadian non-exporters that subsequently entered export markets in the first decade of the 2000s are found to be not only larger and more productive, as has been reported for previous decades, but also more likely to have invested in R&D. Both extramural R&D expenditures (purchased from domestic and foreign suppliers) and intramural R&D expenditures (performed in-house) increase the ability of firms to penetrate export markets. Exporting also has a significant impact on subsequent R&D expenditures; exporters are more likely to start investing in R&D. Firms that began exporting increased the intensity of extramural R&D expenditures in the year in which exporting occurred.

    Release date: 2016-11-28

  • Articles and reports: 18-001-X2013001
    Description:

    This working paper profiles Canadian establishments involved in the development and production of functional foods and/or natural health products (FFNHP). It provides data on the number and types of FFNHP establishments in 2011, covering FFNHP revenues, research and development, patents, products, business practices and the impact of government regulation on the sector.

    Release date: 2013-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012016
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series discusses the impact of capitalization of research and development (R&D) expenditure on gross domestic product (GDP) and productivity growth. Capitalizing R&D expenditure increases the scope of investment, and hence, the level of measured capital and GDP. Because R&D expenditure accounts for a small share of GDP, R&D capitalization has little impact on GDP and labour productivity growth.

    Release date: 2012-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X200900110875
    Description:

    This study is a comparative analysis based on data from the Statistics Canada Bioproducts Development Survey (2003) and the Bioproducts Development and Production Survey 2006. This study examines the current state of the domestic industry, changes occurring over the period, and implications for agriculture.

    Release date: 2009-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200900110818
    Description:

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) collects and reports on statistics from its member countries for various subject matter fields. In order to properly compare these statistics, the OE,CD develops common concepts and measurement standards. For the field of research and development (R&D) statistics, the OECD's proposed standard practice for R&D surveys is detailed in the Frascati Manual (OECD, 2002). However, not all OECD countries' national practices align with the Frascati Manual standards. The OECD receives Canadian R&D data from surveys conducted by Statistics Canada. While the general concepts of the Frascati Manual are integrated with Statistics Canada's survey framework, national variations in reporting with the OECD still exist. One of these national differences in data presentation can be found in the allocation of public general university funds.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200900110817
    Description:

    Investment in research and development (R&D) is important to the economy of a country, and its measurement is an essential component of the Canadian statistical system. The publication, Gross Domestic Expenditures on Research and Development in Canada and the Provinces (GERD), 1997 to 2008 (Statistics Canada, 2008a) provides a statistical picture of the Canadian system of research and development. These data inform public policy, help benchmark Canadian performance against other countries (OECD, 2008 and 2007) and provide essential input to the study of the impact of science and technology on the life of Canadians.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200900110849
    Description:

    This article explores differences in characteristics of innovative and non-innovative manufacturing plants in Canada using results from the Survey of Innovation (SOI) 2005. It finds that innovative plants are more likely than non-innovators to be large, to have employees with higher education credentials, to engage in research and development (R&D) and marketing activities and to have full-time R&D employees. Innovative plants are also more likely to receive external funding, to export and import, to use both formal and informal methods of intellectual property protection, and to have differences in how they rate the importance of success factors.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800210740
    Description:

    This article highlights expenditures and personnel devoted annually to scientific research and development (R&D) by Canadian private non-profit (PNP) organizations. These organizations play an important role in the Canadian R&D landscape: providing financial support to researchers in universities and other laboratories and performing their own research.

    Release date: 2008-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800210741
    Description:

    Innovation commercialization, the process of introducing a new or significantly improved product to market, is an important innovation activity for a plant and is the final stage in new product development. Without successful commercialization, innovations may not return any benefits for a plant's innovation efforts. The Survey of Innovation 2005 asked innovative manufacturing plants questions related to commercialization activities and provides information on the type of these activities being undertaken. Market success is measured in terms of the share of revenues in 2004 from product innovations introduced during the years 2002 to 2004.

    Release date: 2008-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800210739
    Description:

    The 2006 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) included two questions that dealt with the issues of organizational and technological change. This article will examine organizational and technological change in the private and public sectors, providing the first look at this cross-economy data. An upcoming article will explore the relationship between the introduction of significantly improved organizational structures, management techniques, or technology and the training associated with implementation of these changes.

    Release date: 2008-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800210742
    Description:

    In its recently released science and technology (S&T) strategy, Mobilizing Science and Technology to Canada's Advantage (Government of Canada 2007), the federal government stated its commitment to improving its ability to measure and report on the impact of federal S&T expenditures. In response to this challenge, the Policy Research Initiative (PRI) collaborated with departments and agencies that conduct and fund S&T to explore these issues. This article provides a summary from one of the PRI reports, The Transmission of Technology and Knowledge to Innovative Manufacturing Firms by Publicly Funded Research Organizations.

    Release date: 2008-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110588
    Description:

    In 2006, a question on Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags was introduced on the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology. RFID tags are currently used by organizations for a wide variety of purposes. The concept of RFID tags combines radio frequencies and bar code systems, giving mobility to logistics. The data on RFID tag usage in Canada show the application of this technology is in its infancy. The small number of organizations that use RFID tags can be explained by the newness of the technology and the potentially high costs of investment and implementation. Despite the initial costs, organizations that use RFID benefit in the longer run.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110581
    Description:

    When an existing firm decides not to commercially develop a discovery, enterprising entrepreneurs may establish a spinoff organization to pursue the venture. Of the 532 biotechnology firms in Canada in 2005, 179 reported that they were spinoffs from another organization.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110584
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Innovation 2005, this article will examine the use of patents by Canadian manufacturing plants. Survey findings establish that plants use strategic methods more than patents for intellectual property protection. Patent use varies both by how big the plant is and whether it is innovative or non-innovative. In addition, the use of patents by Canadian manufacturing plants varies by the subsector in which they are classified.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110580
    Description:

    Data collected through Statistics Canada's life sciences statistics program indicate that Canada has a sizable biotechnology sector in comparison with larger countries in Europe. This program regularly provides assistance to other countries, which view Canada as a world leader in the development of biotechnology statistics. This article notes the future directions and challenges facing the program.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110596
    Description:

    In the fall of 2007, Statistics Canada designed a survey to gather information on how successfully businesses commercialize innovative products. What strategies must businesses use to achieve their ends? How can they attain their business goals? How is commercial success or failure measured? These are some of the challenges that drove the development of a new survey on commercializing innovation.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110585
    Description:

    Despite some limitations, various indicators for evaluating intellectual property provide useful insights. This article discusses measures of commercial value and their limitations.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110579
    Description:

    The last decade of the Innovation Analysis Bulletin (IAB) tells the story of the evolution of the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division (SIEID) and its precursor, the Science and Technology Redesign Project. This evolution brings all the measurement and analysis activities together in an integrated approach to understanding technological and related organizational change. This includes measurement of research and development resources allocated to the formal generation of knowledge (research and development); the use and commercialization of intellectual property of universities, government laboratories and businesses; the activity of innovation; and the adoption and use of advanced manufacturing technologies, biotechnologies, information communication technologies (ICTs), knowledge management practices, nanotechnologies, and emerging technologies.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110595
    Description:

    The 2005 Survey of Innovation asked non-innovative manufacturing plants why they did not innovate; that is, why they did not introduce a new or significantly improved product or process to the market during the three-year reference period 2002 to 2004. Lack of market demand was the main response. An examination of repondents' other specified reasons shows that some non-innovators may actually be innovative although they do not perceive themselves to be. Innovative and non-innovative plants perceive success factors, such as developing and seeking new markets, in significantly different ways. Non-innovative plants are not expected to be innovative in the near future.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008017
    Description:

    This paper examines the growth of human capital in Canadian and U.S. cities. Using pooled Census of Population data for 242 urban centres, we evaluate the link between long run employment growth and the supply of different types of skilled labour. The paper also examines whether the scientific capabilities of cities are influenced by amenities such as the size of the local cultural sector.

    The first part of the paper investigates the contribution of broad and specialized forms of human capital to long-run employment growth. We differentiate between employed degree holders (a general measure of human capital) and degree holders employed in science and cultural occupations (specific measures of human capital). Our growth models investigate long-run changes in urban employment from 1980 to 2000, and control for other factors that have been posited to influence the growth of cities. These include estimates of the amenities that proxy differences in the attractiveness of urban areas.

    The second part of the paper focuses specifically on a particular type of human capital'degree holders in science and engineering occupations. Our models evaluate the factors associated with the medium- and long-run growth of these occupations. Particular attention is placed on disentangling the relationships between science and engineering growth and other forms of human capital.

    Release date: 2008-01-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007016
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the results of several research studies conducted by the Micro-economic Analysis Division of Statistics Canada that investigate the impact of advanced technology use on business performance. These studies combine establishment-level survey data on advanced technology practices with longitudinal data that measure changes in relative performance. Together, these studies provide strong evidence that technology strategies have considerable bearing on competitive outcomes after other correlates of plant performance are taken into account. Advanced communications technologies warrant special emphasis, as the use of these technologies has been shown to be closely associated with changes in relative productivity.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2007063
    Description:

    This study profiles scientists and engineers with doctorates at the beginning of the millennium. Using data from the 2001 Census, it analyzes the geographical distribution of this important Canadian workforce, together with the industrial sector where they work and their earnings.

    Release date: 2007-10-24

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210330
    Description:

    Recent improvements in information and communications technologies (ICTs), coupled with the rise of new global players such as China and India, have enabled firms to outsource a growing share of their activities. This has allowed them to benefit from cost savings and to focus on their core competencies. While domestic and foreign outsourcing of certain manufacturing functions have been prevalent for decades, only recently has the trend extended significantly to services such as legal, accounting, data entry, and research and development (R&D).

    Release date: 2007-10-09

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Analysis (248)

Analysis (248) (25 of 248 results)

  • Articles and reports: 18-001-X2017001
    Description:

    This working paper profiles Canadian firms involved in the development and production of Bioproducts. It provides data on the number and types of Bioproducts firms in 2015, covering bioproducts revenues, research and development, use of biomass, patents, products, business practices and the impact of government regulations on the sector.

    Release date: 2017-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016063
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article highlights notable changes in the pace and composition of industrial research and development (R&D) spending in Canada during the 2000-to-2013 period. The analysis is based on historical time series data that conclude with the publication of estimates for reference year 2013. New data on industrial R&D will be released in the coming months. These new survey results begin with estimates for reference year 2014 and reflect conceptual and methodological changes designed to enhance the scope and relevance of the program. Following the introduction of these changes, a study on the break in the time series will be conducted later in 2017. his article highlights trends in industrial R&D spending in advance of the upcoming release of the new data. The analysis underscores the extent to which support for higher R&D spending in more recent years has come from resource-based companies.

    Release date: 2017-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016386
    Description:

    This paper asks whether research and development (R&D) drives the level of competitiveness required to successfully enter export markets and whether, in turn, participation in export markets increases R&D expenditures. Canadian non-exporters that subsequently entered export markets in the first decade of the 2000s are found to be not only larger and more productive, as has been reported for previous decades, but also more likely to have invested in R&D. Both extramural R&D expenditures (purchased from domestic and foreign suppliers) and intramural R&D expenditures (performed in-house) increase the ability of firms to penetrate export markets. Exporting also has a significant impact on subsequent R&D expenditures; exporters are more likely to start investing in R&D. Firms that began exporting increased the intensity of extramural R&D expenditures in the year in which exporting occurred.

    Release date: 2016-11-28

  • Articles and reports: 18-001-X2013001
    Description:

    This working paper profiles Canadian establishments involved in the development and production of functional foods and/or natural health products (FFNHP). It provides data on the number and types of FFNHP establishments in 2011, covering FFNHP revenues, research and development, patents, products, business practices and the impact of government regulation on the sector.

    Release date: 2013-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012016
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series discusses the impact of capitalization of research and development (R&D) expenditure on gross domestic product (GDP) and productivity growth. Capitalizing R&D expenditure increases the scope of investment, and hence, the level of measured capital and GDP. Because R&D expenditure accounts for a small share of GDP, R&D capitalization has little impact on GDP and labour productivity growth.

    Release date: 2012-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X200900110875
    Description:

    This study is a comparative analysis based on data from the Statistics Canada Bioproducts Development Survey (2003) and the Bioproducts Development and Production Survey 2006. This study examines the current state of the domestic industry, changes occurring over the period, and implications for agriculture.

    Release date: 2009-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200900110818
    Description:

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) collects and reports on statistics from its member countries for various subject matter fields. In order to properly compare these statistics, the OE,CD develops common concepts and measurement standards. For the field of research and development (R&D) statistics, the OECD's proposed standard practice for R&D surveys is detailed in the Frascati Manual (OECD, 2002). However, not all OECD countries' national practices align with the Frascati Manual standards. The OECD receives Canadian R&D data from surveys conducted by Statistics Canada. While the general concepts of the Frascati Manual are integrated with Statistics Canada's survey framework, national variations in reporting with the OECD still exist. One of these national differences in data presentation can be found in the allocation of public general university funds.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200900110817
    Description:

    Investment in research and development (R&D) is important to the economy of a country, and its measurement is an essential component of the Canadian statistical system. The publication, Gross Domestic Expenditures on Research and Development in Canada and the Provinces (GERD), 1997 to 2008 (Statistics Canada, 2008a) provides a statistical picture of the Canadian system of research and development. These data inform public policy, help benchmark Canadian performance against other countries (OECD, 2008 and 2007) and provide essential input to the study of the impact of science and technology on the life of Canadians.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200900110849
    Description:

    This article explores differences in characteristics of innovative and non-innovative manufacturing plants in Canada using results from the Survey of Innovation (SOI) 2005. It finds that innovative plants are more likely than non-innovators to be large, to have employees with higher education credentials, to engage in research and development (R&D) and marketing activities and to have full-time R&D employees. Innovative plants are also more likely to receive external funding, to export and import, to use both formal and informal methods of intellectual property protection, and to have differences in how they rate the importance of success factors.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800210740
    Description:

    This article highlights expenditures and personnel devoted annually to scientific research and development (R&D) by Canadian private non-profit (PNP) organizations. These organizations play an important role in the Canadian R&D landscape: providing financial support to researchers in universities and other laboratories and performing their own research.

    Release date: 2008-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800210741
    Description:

    Innovation commercialization, the process of introducing a new or significantly improved product to market, is an important innovation activity for a plant and is the final stage in new product development. Without successful commercialization, innovations may not return any benefits for a plant's innovation efforts. The Survey of Innovation 2005 asked innovative manufacturing plants questions related to commercialization activities and provides information on the type of these activities being undertaken. Market success is measured in terms of the share of revenues in 2004 from product innovations introduced during the years 2002 to 2004.

    Release date: 2008-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800210739
    Description:

    The 2006 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) included two questions that dealt with the issues of organizational and technological change. This article will examine organizational and technological change in the private and public sectors, providing the first look at this cross-economy data. An upcoming article will explore the relationship between the introduction of significantly improved organizational structures, management techniques, or technology and the training associated with implementation of these changes.

    Release date: 2008-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800210742
    Description:

    In its recently released science and technology (S&T) strategy, Mobilizing Science and Technology to Canada's Advantage (Government of Canada 2007), the federal government stated its commitment to improving its ability to measure and report on the impact of federal S&T expenditures. In response to this challenge, the Policy Research Initiative (PRI) collaborated with departments and agencies that conduct and fund S&T to explore these issues. This article provides a summary from one of the PRI reports, The Transmission of Technology and Knowledge to Innovative Manufacturing Firms by Publicly Funded Research Organizations.

    Release date: 2008-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110588
    Description:

    In 2006, a question on Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags was introduced on the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology. RFID tags are currently used by organizations for a wide variety of purposes. The concept of RFID tags combines radio frequencies and bar code systems, giving mobility to logistics. The data on RFID tag usage in Canada show the application of this technology is in its infancy. The small number of organizations that use RFID tags can be explained by the newness of the technology and the potentially high costs of investment and implementation. Despite the initial costs, organizations that use RFID benefit in the longer run.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110581
    Description:

    When an existing firm decides not to commercially develop a discovery, enterprising entrepreneurs may establish a spinoff organization to pursue the venture. Of the 532 biotechnology firms in Canada in 2005, 179 reported that they were spinoffs from another organization.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110584
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Innovation 2005, this article will examine the use of patents by Canadian manufacturing plants. Survey findings establish that plants use strategic methods more than patents for intellectual property protection. Patent use varies both by how big the plant is and whether it is innovative or non-innovative. In addition, the use of patents by Canadian manufacturing plants varies by the subsector in which they are classified.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110580
    Description:

    Data collected through Statistics Canada's life sciences statistics program indicate that Canada has a sizable biotechnology sector in comparison with larger countries in Europe. This program regularly provides assistance to other countries, which view Canada as a world leader in the development of biotechnology statistics. This article notes the future directions and challenges facing the program.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110596
    Description:

    In the fall of 2007, Statistics Canada designed a survey to gather information on how successfully businesses commercialize innovative products. What strategies must businesses use to achieve their ends? How can they attain their business goals? How is commercial success or failure measured? These are some of the challenges that drove the development of a new survey on commercializing innovation.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110585
    Description:

    Despite some limitations, various indicators for evaluating intellectual property provide useful insights. This article discusses measures of commercial value and their limitations.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110579
    Description:

    The last decade of the Innovation Analysis Bulletin (IAB) tells the story of the evolution of the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division (SIEID) and its precursor, the Science and Technology Redesign Project. This evolution brings all the measurement and analysis activities together in an integrated approach to understanding technological and related organizational change. This includes measurement of research and development resources allocated to the formal generation of knowledge (research and development); the use and commercialization of intellectual property of universities, government laboratories and businesses; the activity of innovation; and the adoption and use of advanced manufacturing technologies, biotechnologies, information communication technologies (ICTs), knowledge management practices, nanotechnologies, and emerging technologies.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110595
    Description:

    The 2005 Survey of Innovation asked non-innovative manufacturing plants why they did not innovate; that is, why they did not introduce a new or significantly improved product or process to the market during the three-year reference period 2002 to 2004. Lack of market demand was the main response. An examination of repondents' other specified reasons shows that some non-innovators may actually be innovative although they do not perceive themselves to be. Innovative and non-innovative plants perceive success factors, such as developing and seeking new markets, in significantly different ways. Non-innovative plants are not expected to be innovative in the near future.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008017
    Description:

    This paper examines the growth of human capital in Canadian and U.S. cities. Using pooled Census of Population data for 242 urban centres, we evaluate the link between long run employment growth and the supply of different types of skilled labour. The paper also examines whether the scientific capabilities of cities are influenced by amenities such as the size of the local cultural sector.

    The first part of the paper investigates the contribution of broad and specialized forms of human capital to long-run employment growth. We differentiate between employed degree holders (a general measure of human capital) and degree holders employed in science and cultural occupations (specific measures of human capital). Our growth models investigate long-run changes in urban employment from 1980 to 2000, and control for other factors that have been posited to influence the growth of cities. These include estimates of the amenities that proxy differences in the attractiveness of urban areas.

    The second part of the paper focuses specifically on a particular type of human capital'degree holders in science and engineering occupations. Our models evaluate the factors associated with the medium- and long-run growth of these occupations. Particular attention is placed on disentangling the relationships between science and engineering growth and other forms of human capital.

    Release date: 2008-01-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007016
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the results of several research studies conducted by the Micro-economic Analysis Division of Statistics Canada that investigate the impact of advanced technology use on business performance. These studies combine establishment-level survey data on advanced technology practices with longitudinal data that measure changes in relative performance. Together, these studies provide strong evidence that technology strategies have considerable bearing on competitive outcomes after other correlates of plant performance are taken into account. Advanced communications technologies warrant special emphasis, as the use of these technologies has been shown to be closely associated with changes in relative productivity.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2007063
    Description:

    This study profiles scientists and engineers with doctorates at the beginning of the millennium. Using data from the 2001 Census, it analyzes the geographical distribution of this important Canadian workforce, together with the industrial sector where they work and their earnings.

    Release date: 2007-10-24

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210330
    Description:

    Recent improvements in information and communications technologies (ICTs), coupled with the rise of new global players such as China and India, have enabled firms to outsource a growing share of their activities. This has allowed them to benefit from cost savings and to focus on their core competencies. While domestic and foreign outsourcing of certain manufacturing functions have been prevalent for decades, only recently has the trend extended significantly to services such as legal, accounting, data entry, and research and development (R&D).

    Release date: 2007-10-09

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