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  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2018-01-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 11F0019M
    Description:

    The Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series provides for the circulation of research conducted by Analytical Studies Branch staff and collaborators. The Series is intended to stimulate discussion on a variety of topics, such as labour, immigration, education and skills, income mobility, well-being, aging, firm dynamics, productivity, economic transitions, and economic geography. Readers of the Series are encouraged to contact the authors with their comments and suggestions. All the papers in the Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series go through institutional and peer review to ensure that they conform to Statistics Canada's mandate as a governmental statistical agency and adhere to generally accepted standards of good professional practice.

    Release date: 2018-01-29

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2018-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 18-001-X2017001
    Description:

    This working paper profiles Canadian firms involved in the development and production of Bioproducts. It provides data on the number and types of Bioproducts firms in 2015, covering bioproducts revenues, research and development, use of biomass, patents, products, business practices and the impact of government regulations on the sector.

    Release date: 2017-12-22

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-12-18

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-12-08

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-12-08

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-11-16

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-09-15

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-07-27

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-05-29

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-02-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016063
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article highlights notable changes in the pace and composition of industrial research and development (R&D) spending in Canada during the 2000-to-2013 period. The analysis is based on historical time series data that conclude with the publication of estimates for reference year 2013. New data on industrial R&D will be released in the coming months. These new survey results begin with estimates for reference year 2014 and reflect conceptual and methodological changes designed to enhance the scope and relevance of the program. Following the introduction of these changes, a study on the break in the time series will be conducted later in 2017. his article highlights trends in industrial R&D spending in advance of the upcoming release of the new data. The analysis underscores the extent to which support for higher R&D spending in more recent years has come from resource-based companies.

    Release date: 2017-02-15

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-02-15

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-12-21

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-11-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016386
    Description:

    This paper asks whether research and development (R&D) drives the level of competitiveness required to successfully enter export markets and whether, in turn, participation in export markets increases R&D expenditures. Canadian non-exporters that subsequently entered export markets in the first decade of the 2000s are found to be not only larger and more productive, as has been reported for previous decades, but also more likely to have invested in R&D. Both extramural R&D expenditures (purchased from domestic and foreign suppliers) and intramural R&D expenditures (performed in-house) increase the ability of firms to penetrate export markets. Exporting also has a significant impact on subsequent R&D expenditures; exporters are more likely to start investing in R&D. Firms that began exporting increased the intensity of extramural R&D expenditures in the year in which exporting occurred.

    Release date: 2016-11-28

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-03-18

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-02-12

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-12-11

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-12-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-622-M
    Description:

    The Canadian Economy in Transition is a series of new analytical reports that investigate the dynamics of industrial change in the Canadian economy. Many of these studies focus on the growth and development of industries that are often described as vanguards of the new economy, such as information and communications technology industries and science-based industries (heavy investors in research and development and human capital). Other studies examine the role that knowledge workers play in Canada's industrial evolution. In addition, future studies will investigate productivity performance in different industrial sectors.

    This new series brings together a coherent set of research reports that provide users with a wide variety of empirical perspectives on the economy's changing industrial structure. These perspectives include the dynamics of productivity, profitability, employment, output, investment, occupational structure and industrial geography.

    Release date: 2015-10-08

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-07-29

  • Journals and periodicals: 11F0027M
    Description:

    The Economic Analysis Research Paper Series provides the circulation of research conducted by the staff of National Accounts and Analytical Studies, visiting fellows and academic associates. The research paper series is meant to stimulate discussion on a range of topics including the impact of the new economy; productivity issues; firm profitability; technology usage; the effect of financing on firm growth; depreciation functions; the use of satellite accounts; savings rates; leasing; firm dynamics; hedonic estimations; diversification patterns; investment patterns; the differences in the performance of small and large, or domestic and multinational firms; and purchasing power parity estimates. Readers of the series are encouraged to contact the authors with comments, criticisms and suggestions.

    The primary distribution medium for the papers is the Internet. These papers can be downloaded from the Internet at www.statcan.gc.ca for free. Papers in the series are distributed to Statistics Canada Regional Offices and provincial statistical focal points.

    All papers in the Economic Analysis Series go through institutional and peer review to ensure that they conform to Statistics Canada's mandate as a government statistical agency and adhere to generally accepted standards of good professional practice.

    The papers in the series often include results derived from multivariate analysis or other statistical techniques. It should be recognized that the results of these analyses are subject to uncertainty in the reported estimates.

    The level of uncertainty will depend on several factors: the nature of the functional form used in the multivariate analysis; the type of econometric technique employed; the appropriateness of the statistical assumptions embedded in the model or technique; the comprehensiveness of the variables included in the analysis; and the accuracy of the data that are utilized. The peer group review process is meant to ensure that the papers in the series have followed accepted standards to minimize problems in each of these areas.

    Release date: 2015-07-24

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-08-25

Reference (197)

Reference (197) (25 of 197 results)

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004006
    Description:

    Biotechnology is a pervasive technology used in several industrial sectors, making collecting sound data a real challenge. This paper describes the methodology of the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey. Some of the specific issues dealt with are the definitions of biotechnology and innovative biotechnology firms, the target population, sampling, data collection procedures, and data quality evaluation.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004005
    Description:

    This document presents the geographical distribution of federal government expenditures on science and technology. The statistics presented in this report are supplements of data published in the Service Bulletin 'Science Statistics' Volume 28, Number 3, Catalogue no. 88-001XIE.

    Included in this report are tables presenting expenditures and staff of federal government scientific establishments for the fiscal year 2001/02.

    Release date: 2004-02-12

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004002
    Description:

    This publication explains the estimation procedures used to calculate 2001/02 research and development (R&D) expenditures in the Higher Education sector. The Higher Education Research and Development (HERD) performance figures are estimated using a new technique that was developed in 2000 and first applied to the 1998/99 data. It assumes that the total expenditures on HERD are equal to the sum of

    a) sponsored research (available from Canadian Association of University Business Officers [CAUBO] sources)b) an estimate of indirect expenditures on sponsored researchc) a value for the fraction of faculty time devoted to sponsored and non-sponsored researchd) an estimate of indirect expenditures related to faculty time on researche) teaching hospitals data not included in CAUBO data.

    Release date: 2004-01-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004003
    Description:

    This publication presents the national gross domestic expenditures on research and development (GERD) from 1992 to 2003, as well as the provincial GERD from 1992 to 2001. Up until 1985, GERD only included research and development (R&D) expenditures in the Natural Sciences and Engineering (NSE) field. Beginning in 1985, Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) activities have also been included in GERD. An additional series of tables showing R&D expenditures at the national level in either science from 1963 to 1991, or at the provincial level from 1979 to 1991, may be obtained from the Science and Innovation Surveys Section of the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division.

    Release date: 2004-01-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004004
    Description:

    These notes capture some of the presentations and the subsequent discussions that took place during the meeting of Statistics Canada's Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division. For two full days, over 20 people talked about innovation from different perspectives and sought common understanding of the issues and consensus on where work on the subject should take the form of medium or longer terms. The meeting had a Canadian bias as it was part of the foresight progam of the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division, but it would not have been as productive had Jan Fagerberg not been able to join the group and share the work of the Towards a European Area of Research and Innovation (TEARI) project, which he leads. The meeting was further enriched by the insights gained as members of different communities of discourse exchanged their knowledge and arrived at common conclusions.

    Release date: 2004-01-26

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004001
    Description:

    Technological changes are occurring at home, work and play. In the workplace, change occurs in how business is conducted, its production processes and office procedures and much of this change is related to the introduction of new or significantly improved technologies. This paper is based on information from the 2002 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) (see the Appendix) and concentrates on the acquisition of significantly improved technologies in the private sector. The private sector and its two major subsectors, the goods producing and services producing sectors, are presented by employment-size groups. The technological change rates by major sector are also provided.

    Technological change in the workplace includes the seemingly simple purchases of off-the-shelf technologies such as accounting software; colour printers with double-sided printing and facsimile capabilities; and sophisticated medical diagnostic machines and equipment. Acquisition of new or significantly improved technologies is not limited to purchases, but also includes leasing and licensing as well as customizing and developing technologies. Another technology acquisition method, which could incorporate all of the other technology acquisition methods, is 'putting into place an improved production facility' by, for example, retro-fitting pulp and paper mills. At the turn of the new century, the Canadian private sector is not resisting the lure of change - 4 out of 10 private sector firms introduced technological change from 2000 to 2002.

    Release date: 2004-01-19

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003013
    Description:

    This paper used data from the 2001 Biotechnology Use and Development Survey (BUDS) to look into bioproduct development using biotechnologies. Results show that the development of bioproducts has become an intrinsic part of the activities of Canadian biotechnology firms.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003010
    Description:

    Canadian health research is conducted in universities, teaching hospitals, business enterprises, government laboratories and private non-profit organizations. This research is funded from a variety of sources including public, private, domestic and foreign.

    This paper provides more detailed information than was previously released in Science Statistics (Catalogue no. 88-001, vol. 27, no. 6). This is the fourth time the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division (SIEID) of Statistics Canada has published an estimate of health research and development spending in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-11-07

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003011
    Description:

    Canada's economic growth and competitiveness depends on scientific and technological development, as well as the people responsible for this development, especially those engaged in research and development (R&D). The number of R&D personnel is a supplementary measure to the statistics on intramural expenditures on R&D.

    In this report, we present some statistical estimates and definitions concerning R&D personnel. Data on R&D personnel are derived from surveys and from estimates based on various data sources.

    Release date: 2003-11-07

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003012
    Description:

    In 2001, Statistics Canada conducted the third Survey of Intellectual Property Commercialization in the Higher Education Sector, which was designed to illuminate the overall process of intellectual property (IP) management. Over 100 universities, degree-granting colleges and affiliated research hospitals took part in this voluntary survey. The results show that over 60% of institutions are actively managing (identifying, protecting, promoting and/or commercializing) their IP. Royalties from licensing increased from $18.9 million in 1999 to $44.4 million in 2001. To date, universities and research hospitals have created a total of 680 spin-off companies.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003009
    Description:

    This document presents historical tables displaying Federal Government expenditures and personnel applied to activities in science and technology. The expenditures and personnel for the 2000/01 fiscal year are actual while the data for the 2001/02 and 2002/03 fiscal years are forecasts and estimates, respectively.

    Release date: 2003-05-08

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003008
    Description:

    This document presents the geographical distribution of Federal Government expenditures on science and technology (S&T) for the years 1994/95 to 2000/2001.

    Release date: 2003-05-05

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003005
    Description:

    The main indicators of biotechnology activities in Canada are presented in this article. The data are from the 2001 Biotechnology Use and Development Survey. Within the last few years, except for the amount of financing capital raised, an increase in all the indicators was noticed. For example, the number of innovative firms involved in biotechnology activities rose from 358 in 1999 to 375 in 2001. The Human Health sector outpaces all the other sectors in terms of the number of firms, human resources, biotechnology revenues, biotechnology research and development expenditures, amount of financing capital raised, and the number of products in the pipeline. Contrary to medium-sized and large firms where the personnel is more homogenous, small firms employ mostly highly-qualified workers. The 2001 data show a maturing trend in small firms. Most firms could not hire enough people to fill all their vacancies (estimated at 953 positions in Canada) for the 2001 year.

    Release date: 2003-03-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003006
    Description:

    This working paper is based on a speech delivered by Judith Maxwell, President of the Canadian Policy Research Networks. In her discourse, Ms. Maxwell challenged her listeners to 'think outside of the box' on innovation and to be creative in how they approached the topic. For her, innovation extends beyond economic activities into societal interactions and culture. Therefore, innovation translates into more than productivity growth and improved efficiency, but also better living, working and learning conditions.

    Release date: 2003-03-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003007
    Description:

    This article presents findings from a 2001 Canadian pilot survey on the use of knowledge management practices by firms. Of the firms surveyed, 9 out of 10 firms reported using at least 1 of the 23 knowledge management practices that were studied. This survey, a world first by a statistical agency, measured the extent to which knowledge management practices were used by Canadian businesses in forestry and logging; chemical manufacturing; transportation equipment manufacturing; machinery, equipment and supply wholesaler-distributors; and management, scientific and technical consulting services. The reasons for and the results of using knowledge management practices, as well as the practices themselves, are examined by firm size and by type of adopter.

    Release date: 2003-03-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5021
    Release date: 2003-03-25

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003004
    Description:

    The statistics in this document are aggregates of the provincial government science surveys conducted by Statistics Canada under contract with the provinces, and cover the period 1993/94 to 2001/02.

    Release date: 2003-03-17

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003003
    Description:

    Results show that biotechnology companies in Canada are experiencing rapid growth and that Statistics Canada is now capturing more biotechnology activity. For example, between 1997 and 1999, Canadian biotechnology firms grew in number with core biotechnology firms increasing from 282 firms to 358. They brought in $1.9 billion in biotechnology revenues in 1999, compared with $813 million in 1997; they spent around $827 million on biotechnology research and development in 1999, compared with $494 million in 1997.

    Release date: 2003-03-10

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003001
    Description:

    This paper provides a review of the GERD/GDP ratio and other measures of R&D intensity. Canada is compared with two groups of countries: the other members of the G7 and a group of countries in the OECD that reported significantly improved R&D performance over the period 1989 to 1999.

    Release date: 2003-02-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002017
    Description:

    This paper is an exploratory study to help us identify and characterize innovation practices in Canada's dynamic service industries. It uses logistical estimates to demonstrate that innovation in the services sector is not homogeneous. For each type of innovation 'product, process or both. there is a different business strategy. Small firms do more product innovation, and clients, along with fairs and exhibitions, appear to be the primary sources of information.

    Product innovation is generally done by technical services industries. Process innovation does not seem to favour any particular sector but, understandably, the factors that have the most impact on this type of innovation are company flexibility and information from patent literature, consulting firms and internal management. The most complex strategy-for both product and process innovation-is associated with large firms in the communications and finance sub-sectors. This type of innovation has a larger number of significant factors than the other two types. Finally, this paper shows that there are differences among the forms of innovation and that these differences apply within individual sub-sectors.

    Release date: 2003-01-15

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002016
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation 1999 was conducted in the fall of 1999. It surveyed the manufacturing field and was the first innovation survey of selected natural resource industries.

    This is part of a series of working papers based on the Survey of Innovation 1999. Previous working papers include an examination of national estimates of innovation in manufacturing and statistical tables of provincial estimates of innovation in manufacturing.

    This document includes a description of survey methodology, as well as statistical tables for manufacturing industries at the national level for all non write-in questions from the Survey of Innovation 1999 questionnaire.

    Tables present survey results on the following subjects: competitive environment; firm success factors; percentage of innovative firms; unsuccessful or not yet completed innovation projects; activities linked to innovation; sources of information; objectives; problems and obstacles; impact; cooperative and collaborative arrangements; most important innovation; building and construction products; natural resource products; research and development; intellectual property; human resources; andgovernment support programs.

    Release date: 2003-01-13

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002015
    Description:

    This publication presents the national gross domestic expenditures on research and development (GERD) from 1991 to 2002, as well as the provincial GERD from 1991 to 2000. Up until 1985, GERD included research and development (R&D) expenditures in just the Natural Sciences and Engineering (NSE) field. Beginning in 1985, Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) activities were also included in GERD. An additional series of tables, showing R&D expenditures at the national level in either science from 1963 to 1990 or at the provincial level from 1979 to 1990, may be obtained from the Science and Innovation Surveys Section of the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division.

    Release date: 2003-01-10

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002014
    Description:

    This publication provides an explanation of the estimation procedures used to calculate research and development (R & D) expenditures in the higher education sector for 2000-2001.

    Release date: 2003-01-10

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002013
    Description:

    Statistics Canada conducted the Survey of Innovation 1999 in the fall of 1999. It surveyed manufacturing and was the first survey to study innovation in selected natural resource industries. This publication is part of a series of working papers based largely on the Survey of Innovation 1999. It uses a systems approach to understanding innovation in the mineral sector with a focus on metal ore mining. It also describes a model for the mineral sector system. Descriptive statistics and statistical tables present data for some of the industries included in the system including an analysis of the type of innovation and the innovative activities of mining firms. The publication examines information sources for innovation, objectives of innovation, and firm success factors. Data from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology 2000 are used to explore how improved technologies were introduced to firms.

    Release date: 2002-07-23

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002012
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's Survey of Innovation 1999 surveyed manufacturing in the fall of 1999. It was the first innovation survey of selected natural resource industries. This paper is part of a series of working papers based on the Survey of Innovation 1999. This paper details the survey methodology, including decisions taken and lessons learned regarding survey design.

    Release date: 2002-06-28

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