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All (36)

All (36) (25 of 36 results)

  • Technical products: 88F0006X1999010
    Description:

    This second edition of R&D tax treatment in Canada: a provincial comparison, uses a method developed by the Conference Board of Canada to compare the tax incentives to do research and development (R&D) in each of the provinces. The results contribute to the analysis of regional differences in science and technology activity in Canada, as part of the work of the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division of Statistics Canada.

    An example of a regional difference is the tax incentive to do R&D in a province. There is the federal Scientific Research and Experimental Development tax programme, which has regional variations. Six out of ten provinces have their own incentive programmes and tax rates which differ from province to province. The B-Index analysis of the Conference Board provides a means of comparing tax incentives and of providing an indicator.

    Release date: 1999-12-30

  • Technical products: 88F0006X1999008
    Description:

    This publication presents the national gross domestic expenditures on research and development (GERD) from 1988 to 1999 as well as the provincial GERD from 1988 to 1997. An additional series of tables showing research and development (R&D) expenditures at the national level in either science from 1963 to 1987, or at the provincial level from 1979 to 1987, may be obtained from the Science and Innovation Surveys Section, Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division.

    Release date: 1999-12-24

  • Technical products: 88F0006X1999009
    Description:

    This working paper presents the estimation procedures used to calculate the research and development (R&D) expenditures in the higher education sector for the year 1979-80 to 1997-98.

    Release date: 1999-12-24

  • Table: 88-001-X19990107930
    Description:

    This service bulletin presents the geographic distribution of federal government science and technologyexpenditures. Data on federal government expenditures on science and technology are found in Volume 23,No. 5 of this publication, released in October, 1999. In both this and the earlier bulletin, science and technology (S&T) expenditure is the sum of expenditures on research and development (R&D) and on related scientific activities (RSA).

    Release date: 1999-12-23

  • Table: 88-001-X19990097966
    Description:

    The statistics presented in this bulletin are derived from our latest survey of industrial research and development activities in Canada. The survey reports on the research and development spending intentions for 1999, the estimates for 1998 and the actual expenditures for 1997 of corporations performing research and development activities in Canada. In 1997, a decision was made to eliminate the short survey forms in favour of administrative data, in order to reduce the response burden.

    Release date: 1999-12-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-518-X
    Description:

    The food-processing industry benefits from a wide a range of new advanced technologies. Technological advances include computer-based information and control systems, as well as sophisticated processing and packaging methods that enhance product quality, improve food safety and reduce costs. Continuous quality improvement and benchmarking are examples of related business practices.

    This study examines the use of advanced technologies in the food-processing industry. It focuses not just on the incidence and intensity of use of these new technologies but also on the way technology relates to overall firm strategy. It also examines how technology use is affected by selected industry structural characteristics and how the adoption of technologies affects the performance of firms. It considers as well how the environment influences technological change. The nature and structure of the industry are shown to condition the competitive environment, the business strategies that are pursued, product characteristics and the role of technology.

    Firms make strategic choices in light of technological opportunities and the risks and opportunities provided by their competitive environments. They implement strategies through appropriate business practices and activities, including the development of core competencies in the areas of marketing, production and human resources, as well as technology. Firms that differ in size and nationality choose to pursue different technological strategies. This study focuses on how these differences are reflected in the different use of technology for large and small establishments, for foreign and domestic plants and for plants in different industries.

    Release date: 1999-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999105
    Description:

    This paper outlines the growth in advanced technology use that has taken place over the last decade in Canadian manufacturing establishments. It presents the percentage of plants that use any one of the advanced technologies studied and how this has changed between 1989 and 1998. It also investigates how growth rates in the 1990s have varied across different technologies in specific functional areas, such as design and engineering, fabrication, communications, and integration and control. In an attempt to discover how changes in technology use are related to certain plant characteristics, the paper then investigates whether the growth in technology use varies across plants that differ by size, nationality and industry. Multivariate analysis is used to investigate the joint effects of plant size, foreign ownership and industry on the incidence of technology adoption and how these effects have changed over the last decade.

    Release date: 1999-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 88F0017M1999007
    Description:

    This paper looks at the impediments to innovations perceived by Canadian firms. It focuses on communication, financial services and technical business services.

    Release date: 1999-12-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999137
    Description:

    This paper describes the evidence that several Statistics Canada studies have developed on the importance of innovation to growth and the need for highly skilled workers in the innovation process. Rather than focusing on broad industry aggregates as is often done, we concentrate our attention on firms and their behaviour. This allows us to investigate the connection between the success of businesses and the strategies that they pursue.

    We find that the more successful firms attribute their success to having developed competencies in a wide range of areas-but that the common factor that most frequently distinguishes faster from slower growing firms is innovation. Innovators in turn place greater emphasis on training and acquiring skilled workers.

    The studies also show that the emphasis on highly skilled workers varies across industries. In goods industries, a training strategy complements an innovation strategy that focuses on R&D, the adoption of new advanced technologies, or the development of new processes. Small firms that are innovative train their workers when they introduce new machinery and equipment. In the service sector, the innovation strategy relies less on new capital and more on new skills embodied in the workforce. Here there is evidence that a training strategy, by itself, has more impact on the success of a firm-probably because it is more likely to be the innovation strategy of the firm.

    Release date: 1999-11-30

  • Table: 88-001-X1999008
    Description:

    This release provides data on the research and development activities of theprivate non-profit sector. Although the contribution of this sector to the national research and development effort is small in dollar terms, its impact, particularly in the university sector, is significant.Questionnaires were mailed to 95 private non-profit organizations thought to be supporting research and development activities.Twenty-twoorganizations reported performing research and development.

    Release date: 1999-11-26

  • Table: 88-001-X19990087967
    Description:

    This release provides data on the research and development activities of the private non-profit sector.

    Release date: 1999-11-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999101
    Description:

    This paper examines the factors contributing to innovative activity in the Canadian food processing sector. The study first focuses on the importance of research and development activity and advanced business practices used by production and engineering departments. Second, it examines the extent to which larger firm size and less competition serve to stimulate competition-the so-called Schumpeterian hypothesis. Third, the effect of the nationality of a firm on innovation is investigated. Finally, industry effects are examined.

    The paper finds that business practices are significantly related to the probability that a firm is innovative. This is also the case for R&D. Size effects are significant, particularly for process innovations. Elsewhere, their effect is greatly diminished once business practices are included. Foreign ownership is significant only for process innovations and not for product innovations. Competition matters, more so for product than for process innovations. Establishments in the 'other' food products industry tend to lead when it comes to innovation, whereas fish product plants tend to lag.

    Release date: 1999-11-25

  • Table: 88-001-X19990077968
    Description:

    The Higher Education sector is composed of all universities, colleges of technology and other institutes of post-secondary education, whatever their source of finance or legal status.

    Release date: 1999-11-24

  • Articles and reports: 88F0017M1999006
    Description:

    This report describes the basic characteristics of the firms using biotechnologies, the type of use of biotechnologies, the stage of use and future use, the obstacles to acquisition and implementation of biotechnologies, the advantages obtained, and internal and external sources of information leading to biotechnology use.

    Release date: 1999-11-19

  • Table: 88-001-X19990067969
    Description:

    The estimate for research and development in the higher education sector has been revised.

    Release date: 1999-11-16

  • Table: 88-001-X19990057970
    Description:

    This Bulletin provides recent information on the performance and funding of Federal Government Expenditures on Scientific Activities, 1999-2000.

    Release date: 1999-10-29

  • Technical products: 88F0006X1999004
    Description:

    For the first time, estimates of expenditures on research and development in the health field. As part of on-going efforts to improve science and technology statistics in Canada, today's estimates result from consultations and work done for many organizations with an interest in health research and development statistics. Initial findings indicate health is a major area for research and development with almost $1 out of every $6 research dollars in Canada being spent in the health field. In 1998, an estimated $2.3 billion dollars was spent on health R&D done in universities, teaching hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, government laboratories and private non-profit organizations. Health R&D accounted for 16% of total R&D expenditures.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Technical products: 88F0006X1999007
    Description:

    The information in this document is intended primarily to be used by scientific and technological (S&T) policy makers, both federal and provincial, largely as a basis for interprovincial and intersectoral comparisons.The statistics are aggregates of the provincial government science surveys conducted by Statistics Canada under contract with the provinces, and cover the period 1990-1991 to 1998-1999e. The surveys have covered as many as nine provinces, the exception being Prince Edward Island.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Technical products: 88F0006X1999005
    Description:

    The study of the adoption and dissemination of technologies is one of the key components of innovation and technological development. Indeed, it is through the adoption of newer, more advanced, technologies that industries can increase their production capabilities, improve their productivity, and expand their lines of new products and services. Surveys on the adoption of new technologies complement other information collected about R&D and innovation, allow the measurement of and how quickly and in what way industries adapt to technological change.

    This is the fifth Survey of Advanced Technology in the Canadian Manufacturing Sector. Three surveys of advanced manufacturing technologies were conducted in 1987, 1989 and 1993 (which was part of the Survey of Advanced Technology in Canadian Manufacturing), followed by a survey of the use of biotechnology by Canadian industries, conducted in 1997.

    Increasingly, manufacturing industries rely on information technology and telecommunications, computerizing and linking all functions of their production process. This survey puts the emphasis on issues such as the use of communication networks, whether internal (e. g. Local Area Networks) or external (e.g. the Internet).

    Release date: 1999-08-23

  • Table: 88-001-X19990047980
    Description:

    This is the first time Statistics Canada has published an estimate of health research and development spending in Canada.

    Release date: 1999-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990014623
    Description:

    A new framework developed by Statistics Canada's, Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division classifies the science and technology (S&T) process into activities - the generation, transmission and use of knowledge - as well as linkages and outcomes. By asking some essential questions, the framework can help us better understand the relationship between science and technology and other activities and, ultimately, its impact on society.

    Release date: 1999-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990014629
    Description:

    The growth of the Canadian economy depends largely on scientific and technological innovation in its knowledge-based industries. Research and development in the aerospace, environmental technology, information technology, biotechnology and telecommunications industries requires a highly qualified labour force with the right skills. A new paper reveals how well we're doing matching skills to demand.

    Release date: 1999-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990014625
    Description:

    To gauge the scope of Canadian contributions to global scientific knowledge, researchers turned to bibliometrics - the science of measuring published material. They found interesting patters at work in Canada, both in terms of subject matter and the nature of our collaborations.

    Release date: 1999-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990014627
    Description:

    Twenty years ago, it was rare for a university to patent an invention, create a spin-off company or license a technology - the priority was to "publish or perish." But according to the results of a new pilot survey, the catch phrase might well become "patent or publish". In 1997-98, Canada's universities registered 143 new patents and licensed 243 technologies, bringing in almost $16 million in royalties.

    Release date: 1999-07-23

  • Table: 88-001-X19990037981
    Description:

    The statistics presented in this bulletin are derived from our latest survey of industrial Research and development activities in Canada. The survey reports on the research and development spending intentions for 1998, the estimates for 1997 and the actual expenditures for 1996 of corporations performing research and development activities in Canada.

    Release date: 1999-06-30

Data (12)

Data (12) (12 of 12 results)

  • Table: 88-001-X19990107930
    Description:

    This service bulletin presents the geographic distribution of federal government science and technologyexpenditures. Data on federal government expenditures on science and technology are found in Volume 23,No. 5 of this publication, released in October, 1999. In both this and the earlier bulletin, science and technology (S&T) expenditure is the sum of expenditures on research and development (R&D) and on related scientific activities (RSA).

    Release date: 1999-12-23

  • Table: 88-001-X19990097966
    Description:

    The statistics presented in this bulletin are derived from our latest survey of industrial research and development activities in Canada. The survey reports on the research and development spending intentions for 1999, the estimates for 1998 and the actual expenditures for 1997 of corporations performing research and development activities in Canada. In 1997, a decision was made to eliminate the short survey forms in favour of administrative data, in order to reduce the response burden.

    Release date: 1999-12-22

  • Table: 88-001-X1999008
    Description:

    This release provides data on the research and development activities of theprivate non-profit sector. Although the contribution of this sector to the national research and development effort is small in dollar terms, its impact, particularly in the university sector, is significant.Questionnaires were mailed to 95 private non-profit organizations thought to be supporting research and development activities.Twenty-twoorganizations reported performing research and development.

    Release date: 1999-11-26

  • Table: 88-001-X19990087967
    Description:

    This release provides data on the research and development activities of the private non-profit sector.

    Release date: 1999-11-26

  • Table: 88-001-X19990077968
    Description:

    The Higher Education sector is composed of all universities, colleges of technology and other institutes of post-secondary education, whatever their source of finance or legal status.

    Release date: 1999-11-24

  • Table: 88-001-X19990067969
    Description:

    The estimate for research and development in the higher education sector has been revised.

    Release date: 1999-11-16

  • Table: 88-001-X19990057970
    Description:

    This Bulletin provides recent information on the performance and funding of Federal Government Expenditures on Scientific Activities, 1999-2000.

    Release date: 1999-10-29

  • Table: 88-001-X19990047980
    Description:

    This is the first time Statistics Canada has published an estimate of health research and development spending in Canada.

    Release date: 1999-07-30

  • Table: 88-001-X19990037981
    Description:

    The statistics presented in this bulletin are derived from our latest survey of industrial Research and development activities in Canada. The survey reports on the research and development spending intentions for 1998, the estimates for 1997 and the actual expenditures for 1996 of corporations performing research and development activities in Canada.

    Release date: 1999-06-30

  • Table: 88-001-X19990027982
    Description:

    The provincial government sector consists of all provincial government departments, ministries and agencies and provincial research organizations.

    Release date: 1999-05-31

  • Table: 88-001-X19990017983
    Description:

    The provincial research organizations account for only a small proportion of the total scientific activities conducted in Canada, approximately 1% of the estimated expenditures for Research and development in 1997.

    Release date: 1999-04-16

  • Table: 88-516-X
    Description:

    Innovation is at the heart of economic growth and development. It is through innovation that new products are brought to market, new production processes developed and organizational change realized. Given existing cross-industry variations in structure, competitiveness and maturity, it is reasonable to expect that firms in different industries will innovate for different reasons, in different ways and with different results. This report focuses on how the innovation activities of firms in three dynamic service industries are conditioned by their different environments.

    Through an understanding of what competitive pressures come into play and how these pressures affect the type of innovation that is performed, Innovation in dynamic service industries goes some way in illustrating how innovation regimes differ substantially, and quite logically, from one industry to another.

    This is the fifth in the series of publications on innovation and technological change in Canada. One of the earlier studies investigated the type of innovation taking place in the manufacturing sector (Baldwin and Da Pont, Innovation in Canadian manufacturing enterprises, Catalogue No. 88-513-XPB). Two others focused on advanced manufacturing technologies. The first (Baldwin and Sabourin, Technology adoption in Canadian manufacturing, Catalogue No. 88-512-XPB) outlined the intensity of use of these technologies. The second (Baldwin, Sabourin, and Rafiquzzaman, Benefits and problems associated with technology adoption, Catalogue No. 88-514-XPE) investigated the determinants of adoption. Another study (Baldwin, Innovation and intellectual property, Catalogue No. 88-515-XPE) examined how innovative firms protect their intellectual property after they have innovated.

    Release date: 1999-01-18

Analysis (12)

Analysis (12) (12 of 12 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-518-X
    Description:

    The food-processing industry benefits from a wide a range of new advanced technologies. Technological advances include computer-based information and control systems, as well as sophisticated processing and packaging methods that enhance product quality, improve food safety and reduce costs. Continuous quality improvement and benchmarking are examples of related business practices.

    This study examines the use of advanced technologies in the food-processing industry. It focuses not just on the incidence and intensity of use of these new technologies but also on the way technology relates to overall firm strategy. It also examines how technology use is affected by selected industry structural characteristics and how the adoption of technologies affects the performance of firms. It considers as well how the environment influences technological change. The nature and structure of the industry are shown to condition the competitive environment, the business strategies that are pursued, product characteristics and the role of technology.

    Firms make strategic choices in light of technological opportunities and the risks and opportunities provided by their competitive environments. They implement strategies through appropriate business practices and activities, including the development of core competencies in the areas of marketing, production and human resources, as well as technology. Firms that differ in size and nationality choose to pursue different technological strategies. This study focuses on how these differences are reflected in the different use of technology for large and small establishments, for foreign and domestic plants and for plants in different industries.

    Release date: 1999-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999105
    Description:

    This paper outlines the growth in advanced technology use that has taken place over the last decade in Canadian manufacturing establishments. It presents the percentage of plants that use any one of the advanced technologies studied and how this has changed between 1989 and 1998. It also investigates how growth rates in the 1990s have varied across different technologies in specific functional areas, such as design and engineering, fabrication, communications, and integration and control. In an attempt to discover how changes in technology use are related to certain plant characteristics, the paper then investigates whether the growth in technology use varies across plants that differ by size, nationality and industry. Multivariate analysis is used to investigate the joint effects of plant size, foreign ownership and industry on the incidence of technology adoption and how these effects have changed over the last decade.

    Release date: 1999-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 88F0017M1999007
    Description:

    This paper looks at the impediments to innovations perceived by Canadian firms. It focuses on communication, financial services and technical business services.

    Release date: 1999-12-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999137
    Description:

    This paper describes the evidence that several Statistics Canada studies have developed on the importance of innovation to growth and the need for highly skilled workers in the innovation process. Rather than focusing on broad industry aggregates as is often done, we concentrate our attention on firms and their behaviour. This allows us to investigate the connection between the success of businesses and the strategies that they pursue.

    We find that the more successful firms attribute their success to having developed competencies in a wide range of areas-but that the common factor that most frequently distinguishes faster from slower growing firms is innovation. Innovators in turn place greater emphasis on training and acquiring skilled workers.

    The studies also show that the emphasis on highly skilled workers varies across industries. In goods industries, a training strategy complements an innovation strategy that focuses on R&D, the adoption of new advanced technologies, or the development of new processes. Small firms that are innovative train their workers when they introduce new machinery and equipment. In the service sector, the innovation strategy relies less on new capital and more on new skills embodied in the workforce. Here there is evidence that a training strategy, by itself, has more impact on the success of a firm-probably because it is more likely to be the innovation strategy of the firm.

    Release date: 1999-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999101
    Description:

    This paper examines the factors contributing to innovative activity in the Canadian food processing sector. The study first focuses on the importance of research and development activity and advanced business practices used by production and engineering departments. Second, it examines the extent to which larger firm size and less competition serve to stimulate competition-the so-called Schumpeterian hypothesis. Third, the effect of the nationality of a firm on innovation is investigated. Finally, industry effects are examined.

    The paper finds that business practices are significantly related to the probability that a firm is innovative. This is also the case for R&D. Size effects are significant, particularly for process innovations. Elsewhere, their effect is greatly diminished once business practices are included. Foreign ownership is significant only for process innovations and not for product innovations. Competition matters, more so for product than for process innovations. Establishments in the 'other' food products industry tend to lead when it comes to innovation, whereas fish product plants tend to lag.

    Release date: 1999-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 88F0017M1999006
    Description:

    This report describes the basic characteristics of the firms using biotechnologies, the type of use of biotechnologies, the stage of use and future use, the obstacles to acquisition and implementation of biotechnologies, the advantages obtained, and internal and external sources of information leading to biotechnology use.

    Release date: 1999-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990014623
    Description:

    A new framework developed by Statistics Canada's, Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division classifies the science and technology (S&T) process into activities - the generation, transmission and use of knowledge - as well as linkages and outcomes. By asking some essential questions, the framework can help us better understand the relationship between science and technology and other activities and, ultimately, its impact on society.

    Release date: 1999-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990014629
    Description:

    The growth of the Canadian economy depends largely on scientific and technological innovation in its knowledge-based industries. Research and development in the aerospace, environmental technology, information technology, biotechnology and telecommunications industries requires a highly qualified labour force with the right skills. A new paper reveals how well we're doing matching skills to demand.

    Release date: 1999-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990014625
    Description:

    To gauge the scope of Canadian contributions to global scientific knowledge, researchers turned to bibliometrics - the science of measuring published material. They found interesting patters at work in Canada, both in terms of subject matter and the nature of our collaborations.

    Release date: 1999-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990014627
    Description:

    Twenty years ago, it was rare for a university to patent an invention, create a spin-off company or license a technology - the priority was to "publish or perish." But according to the results of a new pilot survey, the catch phrase might well become "patent or publish". In 1997-98, Canada's universities registered 143 new patents and licensed 243 technologies, bringing in almost $16 million in royalties.

    Release date: 1999-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998119
    Description:

    This study examines differences in technology use in Canada as opposed to the United States as well as reasons for these differences. It examines different aspects of technology use-numbers of technologies used, types of technologies used, as well as regional, size and industry variations in their use. It then investigates differences in benefits that plant managers perceive stem from advanced technology use and differences in the factors that managers assess as impediments. While managers in both countries generally place quite similar emphases on items in the list of benefits received and problems that have impeded adoption, there are significant differences that arise because of the smaller size of the Canadian market.

    Release date: 1999-04-07

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-517-X
    Description:

    New firms are seen to play a key role in the innovation process, especially in certain key sectors of the economy. This study therefore examines the differences in the profiles of successful new firms in science-based industries and other industries. The firms that are examined are entrants who survey into their early teen years. The study examines numerous factors that are seen to influence the success of new businesses. These include the competitive environment, business strategies and the financial structure of the businesses.

    Successful new firms in science-based industries are found to differ in a number of dimensions from new firms in other industries. They are more likely to be exporters. They face greater technological change and intense competition with regards to the rate at which new products are being introduced. They tend to put more emphasis on quality, the frequent introduction of new products and the customization of products. They make greater use of information technology. They place more stress on new technology development, research and development facilities and the use of intellectual property. They are much more likely to innovate and they place more importance on recruiting skilled labour and on training. Finally, they are more likely to use non-traditional financial measures to evaluate performance and they are less likely to rely on secured credit for financing both their research and development activity and their machinery and equipment that are firms in other sectors.

    Release date: 1999-03-31

Reference (12)

Reference (12) (12 of 12 results)

  • Technical products: 88F0006X1999010
    Description:

    This second edition of R&D tax treatment in Canada: a provincial comparison, uses a method developed by the Conference Board of Canada to compare the tax incentives to do research and development (R&D) in each of the provinces. The results contribute to the analysis of regional differences in science and technology activity in Canada, as part of the work of the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division of Statistics Canada.

    An example of a regional difference is the tax incentive to do R&D in a province. There is the federal Scientific Research and Experimental Development tax programme, which has regional variations. Six out of ten provinces have their own incentive programmes and tax rates which differ from province to province. The B-Index analysis of the Conference Board provides a means of comparing tax incentives and of providing an indicator.

    Release date: 1999-12-30

  • Technical products: 88F0006X1999008
    Description:

    This publication presents the national gross domestic expenditures on research and development (GERD) from 1988 to 1999 as well as the provincial GERD from 1988 to 1997. An additional series of tables showing research and development (R&D) expenditures at the national level in either science from 1963 to 1987, or at the provincial level from 1979 to 1987, may be obtained from the Science and Innovation Surveys Section, Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division.

    Release date: 1999-12-24

  • Technical products: 88F0006X1999009
    Description:

    This working paper presents the estimation procedures used to calculate the research and development (R&D) expenditures in the higher education sector for the year 1979-80 to 1997-98.

    Release date: 1999-12-24

  • Technical products: 88F0006X1999004
    Description:

    For the first time, estimates of expenditures on research and development in the health field. As part of on-going efforts to improve science and technology statistics in Canada, today's estimates result from consultations and work done for many organizations with an interest in health research and development statistics. Initial findings indicate health is a major area for research and development with almost $1 out of every $6 research dollars in Canada being spent in the health field. In 1998, an estimated $2.3 billion dollars was spent on health R&D done in universities, teaching hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, government laboratories and private non-profit organizations. Health R&D accounted for 16% of total R&D expenditures.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Technical products: 88F0006X1999007
    Description:

    The information in this document is intended primarily to be used by scientific and technological (S&T) policy makers, both federal and provincial, largely as a basis for interprovincial and intersectoral comparisons.The statistics are aggregates of the provincial government science surveys conducted by Statistics Canada under contract with the provinces, and cover the period 1990-1991 to 1998-1999e. The surveys have covered as many as nine provinces, the exception being Prince Edward Island.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Technical products: 88F0006X1999005
    Description:

    The study of the adoption and dissemination of technologies is one of the key components of innovation and technological development. Indeed, it is through the adoption of newer, more advanced, technologies that industries can increase their production capabilities, improve their productivity, and expand their lines of new products and services. Surveys on the adoption of new technologies complement other information collected about R&D and innovation, allow the measurement of and how quickly and in what way industries adapt to technological change.

    This is the fifth Survey of Advanced Technology in the Canadian Manufacturing Sector. Three surveys of advanced manufacturing technologies were conducted in 1987, 1989 and 1993 (which was part of the Survey of Advanced Technology in Canadian Manufacturing), followed by a survey of the use of biotechnology by Canadian industries, conducted in 1997.

    Increasingly, manufacturing industries rely on information technology and telecommunications, computerizing and linking all functions of their production process. This survey puts the emphasis on issues such as the use of communication networks, whether internal (e. g. Local Area Networks) or external (e.g. the Internet).

    Release date: 1999-08-23

  • Technical products: 88F0006X1999002
    Description:

    This paper examines the industrial distribution, and levels of unemployment of people who were edu

    Release date: 1999-06-17

  • Technical products: 88F0006X1999003
    Description:

    This paper examines the industrial distribution, and levels of unemployment of people who were educated in science and technology subjects at college, Bachelor, Master's and Ph.D. levels.

    Release date: 1999-06-08

  • Technical products: 88-523-X
    Description:

    This publication outlines a five-year strategic plan for the development of an information system for science and technology.

    Release date: 1999-04-23

  • Technical products: 88F0006X1999001
    Description:

    The linkages between university research and its contribution to national and regional economies are not well understood. During the summer of 1998, Statistics Canada conducted a pilot survey of intellectual property (IP) commercialization in the higher education sector to begin to measure some of the contributions. The voluntary questionnaire was sent to 81 universities and degree-granting colleges, of which 74 responded. The results show that most universities participate in a wide variety of activities including identifying, protecting, promoting and commercializing IP.

    Release date: 1999-03-11

  • Technical products: 88F0006X1998001
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is engaged in the "Information System for Science and Technology Project" to develop useful indicators of activity and a framework to tie them together into a coherent picture of science and technology (S&T) in Canada. The working papers series is used to publish results of the different initiatives conducted within this project. The data are related to the activities, linkages and outcomes of S&T. Several key areas are covered such as: innovation, technology diffusion, human resources in S&T and interrelations between different actors involved in S&T. This series also presents data tabulations taken from regular surveys on research and development (R&D) and S&T and made possible by the project.

    Release date: 1999-02-26

  • Technical products: 88-522-X
    Description:

    The framework described here is intended as a basic operational instrument for systematic development of statistical information respecting the evolution of science and technology and its interactions with the society, the economy and the political system of which it is a part.

    Release date: 1999-02-24

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