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All (44)

All (44) (25 of 44 results)

  • Table: 88-001-X20020097886
    Description:

    This release provides data on the research and development activities of the private non-profit sector. Although the contribution of this sector to the national research and development effort is small in dollar terms, (approximately 0.6% of the total research and development performed in Canada for 2001) its impact, particularly in the university and hospital sectors, is significant.

    Release date: 2002-12-24

  • Journals and periodicals: 16F0024X
    Description:

    Businesses today are involved in a variety of practices aimed at preventing or reducing environmental degradation generated from their production activity. During the 1990s, the environmental regulation context changed. Increasingly, governments have relied on voluntary initiatives undertaken by businesses to reduce pollutants and waste, as opposed to regulations. However, at the same time, the federal authorities have undertaken to revise the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA), in order to increase federal power for environmental regulation but with strong emphasis put on promoting pollution prevention. Consequently, businesses today are looking at alternative ways to limit impacts from their operations on the environment.

    Environmental Management and Technologies in the Business Sector presents a profile of business demand for environmental processes and technologies, pollution prevention methods and environmental practices, such as environmental management systems and voluntary actions. What types of treatment processes are the most popular ones for reducing gas emissions, liquid, solid and hazardous waste, noise, radiation and vibration, for saving energy or for site reclamation? What is the market for environmental processes and technologies? What pollution prevention methods are used more frequently? What additional environmental practices have businesses adopted (for instance, are voluntary programs more popular than eco-labelling?)?

    This paper is based on results from the Survey of Environmental Protection Expenditures. For the first time, the survey asked detailed questions on the type of environmental process or technology used and the adoption of environmental practices. The paper is a complement to both 1996-1997 and 1998 Environmental Protection Expenditures in the Business Sector reports (Catalogue no. 16F0006XIE).

    Release date: 2002-12-20

  • Table: 88-001-X20020087887
    Description:

    Statistics presented are derived from a survey of eight Provincial Research Organizations (PRO): All of these organizations have been established by their respective provincial governments, with a variety of enabling legislation and powers, to provide technical support to primary and secondary industries, to assist in the exploitation of provincial natural resources and to enhance the economy of their provinces. Small and medium-sized companies with limited inhouse technical capability use the services of the provincial research organizations.

    Release date: 2002-12-16

  • Table: 88-001-X20020067892
    Description:

    Institutions in the higher education sector usually have records of funds received by them specifically for research and development , and some can provide lists of research projects carried out by staff. The research and development expenditure estimates are based on reports of payments awarded to institutions through the annual survey of the Canadian Association of University Business Officers (CAUBO).

    Release date: 2002-11-27

  • Table: 88-001-X20020077889
    Description:

    Gross domestic expenditures on research and development (GERD) represents total research and development expenditures performed in a country's national territory during a given year. GERD includes R&D performed within a country and funded from abroad but excludes payments sent abroad for research and development performed in other countries.

    Release date: 2002-11-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036376
    Description:

    One can argue that every organization that provides goods and services is interested in innovation to maximize its competitiveness. The question is whether the organizational structure (the bureaucracy) as the means to organizational ends is conducive to innovations. This paper discusses Dr. Soma Hewa's insights on some of Max Weber's thoughts to understanding the role of innovation in organizations.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036375
    Description:

    A theoretical link between innovation and economic growth has been contemplated since the late 1700s. Professor Ajay Agrawal discusses the significance of knowledge spillovers, the relation to innovation and growth, and the closely related concept of absorptive capacity. Clearly, the immense complexity of the issue of innovation and economic growth has increased scholarly interest in the topic.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036379
    Description:

    Rapid progress in skilled-biased technologies has increased the demand for skilled workers in all countries. The importance of skills for innovation and productivity in Canada is examined in this Industry Canada study.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Table: 88-001-X20020057896
    Description:

    This bulletin provides recent information on the performance and funding of Federal Government Expenditures on Scientific Activities, 2002-2003. The statistics presented are derived from the survey of the science and technology (S&T) activities of federal departments and agencies. According to international convention, S&T is divided into two fields; Natural Sciences and Engineering (NSE) and Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH). These fields of science are further divided into Research and Development (R&D) and Related Scientific Activities (RSA).

    Release date: 2002-10-30

  • Table: 15-001-X20020076510
    Description:

    This analytical paper focusses on how pharmaceutical manufacturing production is distributed and which factors favour its future growth, using such variables as its gross domestic product (GDP), employment, research and development (R&D) and innovation patterns. How this industry differs from other manufacturing industries is also discussed.

    Release date: 2002-10-07

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002013
    Description:

    Statistics Canada conducted the Survey of Innovation 1999 in the fall of 1999. It surveyed manufacturing and was the first survey to study innovation in selected natural resource industries. This publication is part of a series of working papers based largely on the Survey of Innovation 1999. It uses a systems approach to understanding innovation in the mineral sector with a focus on metal ore mining. It also describes a model for the mineral sector system. Descriptive statistics and statistical tables present data for some of the industries included in the system including an analysis of the type of innovation and the innovative activities of mining firms. The publication examines information sources for innovation, objectives of innovation, and firm success factors. Data from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology 2000 are used to explore how improved technologies were introduced to firms.

    Release date: 2002-07-23

  • Table: 88-001-X20020047897
    Description:

    The statistics in this bulletin are derived from the 2000 survey of industrial research and development activities in Canada, which covers firms spending a million dollars or more on the performance or funding of research and development in Canada, and from the administrative data of the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency (CCRA) for firms which spend less than a million dollars on the performance or funding of research and development in Canada. The use of CCRA data results in a small understatement in total figures for the most recent years reported.

    Release date: 2002-07-19

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002011
    Description:

    This publication is part of a series of working papers based on Statistics Canada's Survey of Innovation 1999. It was the first study of innovations in selected natural resource industries. The survey uses a systems approach to understanding advances in the forest sector and describes a model for the Forest Sector System. Descriptive statistics and statistical tables present data for some of the industries included in the system. The text explores innovations produced by forest sector firms, the objectives of the innovations, as well as how knowledge is generated and transmitted within this system.

    Release date: 2002-06-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002012
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's Survey of Innovation 1999 surveyed manufacturing in the fall of 1999. It was the first innovation survey of selected natural resource industries. This paper is part of a series of working papers based on the Survey of Innovation 1999. This paper details the survey methodology, including decisions taken and lessons learned regarding survey design.

    Release date: 2002-06-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002009
    Description:

    This paper is based on information from the 2000 Survey of Electronic Commence and Technology (SECT) and explores organizational and technological changes in the domestic private sector between 1998 and 2000. The discussion contrasts the adoption rates of goods producing industries with service producing industries. The text also discusses the impact of employment size on adoption rates within these two sectors.

    Information includes rates for training, subsequent to the introduction of organizational or technological change, followed by the type of technological change. Finally, data are broken down by major industrial group, within the goods producing and services producing sectors.

    Release date: 2002-06-17

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002010
    Description:

    This document presents historical tables displaying federal government expenditures and personnel data applied to activities in science and technology. Expenditures and personnel for each fiscal year to 1999-2000 are actual while the data for 2000-2001 and 2001-2002 are forecasts and estimates respectively.

    Release date: 2002-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020026373
    Description:

    The manufacturing sector is looked upon as the source of innovation and technological change, but the sheer size of service activity in the economy means that the competitive advantage will increasingly depend upon this sector's ability to innovate and produce technologies.

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020026372
    Description:

    The public sector is often considered staid and unchanging. Based on recent findings, this perception may need to be updated. Four-fifths of Canadian public sector organizations introduced significantly improved organizational structures or management techniques between 1998 and 2000. This rate of introducing organizational change is twice that recorded by the private sector (38%). The public sector also led the private sector overall in the introduction of significantly improved technologies (85% versus 44%).

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020026371
    Description:

    When constructing questions for questionnaires, one of the rules of thumb has always been "keep it short and simple." This article is the third in a series of lessons learned during cognitive testing of the pilot Knowledge Management Practices Survey. It studies the responses given to long questions, thick questionnaires and too many response boxes.

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020026368
    Description:

    Federal science expenditures increased by 8% and personnel went up by 1.1% over the previous year. These details and others were released in the annual publication Federal science activities, Catalogue no. 88-204-XIE on April 12, 2002.

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020026369
    Description:

    Eliminating the "neutral" response in an opinion question not only encourages the respondent to choose a side, it gently persuades respondents to read the question. Learn how we used this technique to our advantage in the Knowledge Management Practices Survey, 2001.

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020026370
    Description:

    Canadian firms are well aware of the benefits of using knowledge management (KM) practices and most of them incorporate some aspects of KM in their management toolkit. Knowledge sharing, creation, generation and maintenance are perceived as important to a firm's productivity.

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020026374
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's annual Economic Conference provides a forum for the exchange of empirical research among business, government, research and labour communities. The conference is also a means to promote economic and socio-economic analyses while subjecting existing data to critical assessment as part of an ongoing process of statistical development and review. This year's theme was Innovation in an Evolving Economy. At the May 6-7, 2002 conference there were 12 presentations, based directly on the analysis of Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division (SIEID) data. These presentations were given by SIEID analysts, by Statistics Canada analysts in other groups, by facilitated access researchers and by analysts using published or commissioned estimates.

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002007
    Description:

    This working paper reports on aggregate Canadian health research and development (R&D) and contains basic definitions and methodology. The statistical data are presented in a funder-performer matrix. Canadian health research is performed in universities, teaching hospitals, business enterprises, government laboratories and private non-profit organizations. This research is funded from a variety of sources including public, private, domestic and foreign donors.

    This is the third time the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division (SIEID) of Statistics Canada has published an estimate of spending on health R&D in Canada.

    Release date: 2002-05-31

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002008
    Description:

    This document reports on the geographical distribution of federal government expenditures on science and technology. The statistics of this report supplements data that were published in the service bulletin "Science Statistics", Vol. 25 no. 12 (catalogue no. 88-001-XIB). Included are tables that show the expenditures and staff of federal government scientific establishments for the fiscal year 1999/2000.

    Release date: 2002-05-31

Data (10)

Data (10) (10 of 10 results)

  • Table: 88-001-X20020097886
    Description:

    This release provides data on the research and development activities of the private non-profit sector. Although the contribution of this sector to the national research and development effort is small in dollar terms, (approximately 0.6% of the total research and development performed in Canada for 2001) its impact, particularly in the university and hospital sectors, is significant.

    Release date: 2002-12-24

  • Table: 88-001-X20020087887
    Description:

    Statistics presented are derived from a survey of eight Provincial Research Organizations (PRO): All of these organizations have been established by their respective provincial governments, with a variety of enabling legislation and powers, to provide technical support to primary and secondary industries, to assist in the exploitation of provincial natural resources and to enhance the economy of their provinces. Small and medium-sized companies with limited inhouse technical capability use the services of the provincial research organizations.

    Release date: 2002-12-16

  • Table: 88-001-X20020067892
    Description:

    Institutions in the higher education sector usually have records of funds received by them specifically for research and development , and some can provide lists of research projects carried out by staff. The research and development expenditure estimates are based on reports of payments awarded to institutions through the annual survey of the Canadian Association of University Business Officers (CAUBO).

    Release date: 2002-11-27

  • Table: 88-001-X20020077889
    Description:

    Gross domestic expenditures on research and development (GERD) represents total research and development expenditures performed in a country's national territory during a given year. GERD includes R&D performed within a country and funded from abroad but excludes payments sent abroad for research and development performed in other countries.

    Release date: 2002-11-27

  • Table: 88-001-X20020057896
    Description:

    This bulletin provides recent information on the performance and funding of Federal Government Expenditures on Scientific Activities, 2002-2003. The statistics presented are derived from the survey of the science and technology (S&T) activities of federal departments and agencies. According to international convention, S&T is divided into two fields; Natural Sciences and Engineering (NSE) and Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH). These fields of science are further divided into Research and Development (R&D) and Related Scientific Activities (RSA).

    Release date: 2002-10-30

  • Table: 15-001-X20020076510
    Description:

    This analytical paper focusses on how pharmaceutical manufacturing production is distributed and which factors favour its future growth, using such variables as its gross domestic product (GDP), employment, research and development (R&D) and innovation patterns. How this industry differs from other manufacturing industries is also discussed.

    Release date: 2002-10-07

  • Table: 88-001-X20020047897
    Description:

    The statistics in this bulletin are derived from the 2000 survey of industrial research and development activities in Canada, which covers firms spending a million dollars or more on the performance or funding of research and development in Canada, and from the administrative data of the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency (CCRA) for firms which spend less than a million dollars on the performance or funding of research and development in Canada. The use of CCRA data results in a small understatement in total figures for the most recent years reported.

    Release date: 2002-07-19

  • Table: 88-001-X20020037899
    Description:

    Data on science and technology (S&T) expenditures and person-years allocated to biotechnology for the year 2000-2001 were collected from selected federal departments and agencies. The criterion for selection was significant activity in this field. Survey results contribute to the work of the Canadian Biotechnology Strategy.

    Release date: 2002-05-01

  • Table: 88-001-X20020027902
    Description:

    Statistics presented are derived from a survey of eight Provincial Research Organizations (PRO): the New Brunswick Research and Productivity Council: the "Centre de recherche industrielle du Québec (CRIQ)": the Industrial Technology Centre (Manitoba) (formerly the Economic Innovation and Technology Council): the Saskatchewan Research Council: the Alberta Research Council: the Yukon Research Institute: the NUNAVUT Research Institute (formerly the Science Institute of the Northwest Territories), and the Aurora Research Institute (Aurora College N.W.T).

    Release date: 2002-04-12

  • Table: 88-001-X20020017903
    Description:

    Statistics presented are derived from a survey of eight Provincial Research Organizations (PRO): the New Brunswick Research and Productivity Council: the "Centre de recherche industrielle du Québec (CRIQ)": the Industrial Technology Centre (Manitoba) (formerly the Economic Innovation and Technology Council): the Saskatchewan Research Council: the Alberta Research Council: the Yukon Research Institute: the NUNAVUT Research Institute (formerly the Science Institute of the Northwest Territories), and the Aurora Research Institute (Aurora College N.W.T).

    Release date: 2002-02-14

Analysis (22)

Analysis (22) (22 of 22 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 16F0024X
    Description:

    Businesses today are involved in a variety of practices aimed at preventing or reducing environmental degradation generated from their production activity. During the 1990s, the environmental regulation context changed. Increasingly, governments have relied on voluntary initiatives undertaken by businesses to reduce pollutants and waste, as opposed to regulations. However, at the same time, the federal authorities have undertaken to revise the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA), in order to increase federal power for environmental regulation but with strong emphasis put on promoting pollution prevention. Consequently, businesses today are looking at alternative ways to limit impacts from their operations on the environment.

    Environmental Management and Technologies in the Business Sector presents a profile of business demand for environmental processes and technologies, pollution prevention methods and environmental practices, such as environmental management systems and voluntary actions. What types of treatment processes are the most popular ones for reducing gas emissions, liquid, solid and hazardous waste, noise, radiation and vibration, for saving energy or for site reclamation? What is the market for environmental processes and technologies? What pollution prevention methods are used more frequently? What additional environmental practices have businesses adopted (for instance, are voluntary programs more popular than eco-labelling?)?

    This paper is based on results from the Survey of Environmental Protection Expenditures. For the first time, the survey asked detailed questions on the type of environmental process or technology used and the adoption of environmental practices. The paper is a complement to both 1996-1997 and 1998 Environmental Protection Expenditures in the Business Sector reports (Catalogue no. 16F0006XIE).

    Release date: 2002-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036376
    Description:

    One can argue that every organization that provides goods and services is interested in innovation to maximize its competitiveness. The question is whether the organizational structure (the bureaucracy) as the means to organizational ends is conducive to innovations. This paper discusses Dr. Soma Hewa's insights on some of Max Weber's thoughts to understanding the role of innovation in organizations.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036375
    Description:

    A theoretical link between innovation and economic growth has been contemplated since the late 1700s. Professor Ajay Agrawal discusses the significance of knowledge spillovers, the relation to innovation and growth, and the closely related concept of absorptive capacity. Clearly, the immense complexity of the issue of innovation and economic growth has increased scholarly interest in the topic.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036379
    Description:

    Rapid progress in skilled-biased technologies has increased the demand for skilled workers in all countries. The importance of skills for innovation and productivity in Canada is examined in this Industry Canada study.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020026373
    Description:

    The manufacturing sector is looked upon as the source of innovation and technological change, but the sheer size of service activity in the economy means that the competitive advantage will increasingly depend upon this sector's ability to innovate and produce technologies.

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020026372
    Description:

    The public sector is often considered staid and unchanging. Based on recent findings, this perception may need to be updated. Four-fifths of Canadian public sector organizations introduced significantly improved organizational structures or management techniques between 1998 and 2000. This rate of introducing organizational change is twice that recorded by the private sector (38%). The public sector also led the private sector overall in the introduction of significantly improved technologies (85% versus 44%).

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020026371
    Description:

    When constructing questions for questionnaires, one of the rules of thumb has always been "keep it short and simple." This article is the third in a series of lessons learned during cognitive testing of the pilot Knowledge Management Practices Survey. It studies the responses given to long questions, thick questionnaires and too many response boxes.

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020026368
    Description:

    Federal science expenditures increased by 8% and personnel went up by 1.1% over the previous year. These details and others were released in the annual publication Federal science activities, Catalogue no. 88-204-XIE on April 12, 2002.

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020026369
    Description:

    Eliminating the "neutral" response in an opinion question not only encourages the respondent to choose a side, it gently persuades respondents to read the question. Learn how we used this technique to our advantage in the Knowledge Management Practices Survey, 2001.

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020026370
    Description:

    Canadian firms are well aware of the benefits of using knowledge management (KM) practices and most of them incorporate some aspects of KM in their management toolkit. Knowledge sharing, creation, generation and maintenance are perceived as important to a firm's productivity.

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020026374
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's annual Economic Conference provides a forum for the exchange of empirical research among business, government, research and labour communities. The conference is also a means to promote economic and socio-economic analyses while subjecting existing data to critical assessment as part of an ongoing process of statistical development and review. This year's theme was Innovation in an Evolving Economy. At the May 6-7, 2002 conference there were 12 presentations, based directly on the analysis of Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division (SIEID) data. These presentations were given by SIEID analysts, by Statistics Canada analysts in other groups, by facilitated access researchers and by analysts using published or commissioned estimates.

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002168
    Description:

    This paper examines the factors contributing to the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian food-processing sector. The numbers of technologies used by a plant is found to be highly correlated with expected gains in firm performance. The benefits of enhanced food safety and quality, as well as productivity improvements, are closely associated with technology use. Impediments that negatively affect technology use include software costs, problems with external financing, lack of cash flow for financing, and internal management problems. Even after accounting for the different benefits and costs associated with technology adoption, the numbers of advanced technologies that are adopted are found to be greater in larger plants, in foreign-controlled plants, in plants that engage in both primary and secondary processing, and in the dairy, fruit and vegetable and "other" food product industries.

    Release date: 2002-05-28

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2001037
    Description:

    This article examines characteristics of the specialized design services industry. While the industry is relatively small, it is strategically important as good design can make products and services more competitive. At a more detailed level, this article provides a 1998 snapshot of the design industry's five sub-industries: landscape architecture, interior design, industrial design, graphic design and "other" design services.

    The article discusses how these five sub-industries are becoming less distinct. The size of firms and how size might be related to expenses, employment patterns in the industry and characteristics of the design workforce are also studied. Also investigated is the regional distribution of design firms, the types of clients they serve and the activities they undertake. Most of the article's findings are based on results from the 1998 Survey of Specialized Design and the 1996 Census.

    Release date: 2002-03-26

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016149
    Description:

    According to the report Profile of Spin-off Firms in the Biotechnology Sector, three out of every 10 companies in Canada's rapidly expanding biotechnology sector in 1999 were spin-offs. These firms, which range from corporate spin-offs to biotechnology companies created by universities and research hospitals, accounted for more than one-quarter of total revenues in 1999.

    Release date: 2002-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016146
    Description:

    This, the first issue of 2002 presents an opportunity to recapitulate some of the findings that we have reported during the life of the Bulletin. In an interview, Dr. Fred Gault, Director of Statistics Canada's Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division, discusses some of the findings on innovation, e-commerce, emerging technologies, Internet use, the telecommunications industry, R&D and commercialization.

    Release date: 2002-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016147
    Description:

    Canadian manufacturing firms fall into two groups: The first uses patents and trademarks as a part of successful innovation strategy consisting of regular R&D financed by R&D grants and tax credits introducing world-first innovations. These are usually large firms in the technology-intensive core sector. The second group includes firms of all sizes in all sectors that rely mostly on trade secrets. They typically transfer technology from abroad by introducing Canada-first innovations and rely on government information services more than on R&D grants and tax credits.

    Release date: 2002-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016152
    Description:

    The Biotechnology Use & Development Survey-1999 provides insights into the transition from R&D to the commercial use of a technology in products and processes. Improvement in product quality is reported as the number one benefit derived from using biotechnologies. This article explores some of the characteristics of the firms that use biotechnologies addressing the questions: "Why use biotechnology?" and "Why not use biotechnology?"

    Release date: 2002-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016163
    Description:

    Firms have to be highly innovative to gain competitive advantage in today's increasingly competitive global market. The competition-innovation linkage is empirically examined using Statistics Canada's Survey of Innovation 1999. The evidence shows competition has a positive and significant impact on both technology invention and technology adoption.

    Release date: 2002-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016148
    Description:

    In September 2000, a small international group met to develop a survey on knowledge management. Creating the pilot questionnaire required a cooperative effort on behalf of survey taking experts, knowledge management specialists and policy analysts. Bringing together a preliminary questionnaire that met the basic requirements of a group of dynamic and outspoken experts, each with individual and collective objectives was not a simple task.

    Release date: 2002-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016150
    Description:

    Given that science and technology skills are a high priority for maintaining Canada's competitive advantage in the new economy, the obvious question is: Where do S&T skills come from and how does Canada compare with other countries? Read the findings from a recent Statistics Canada study that examines the ins and outs of the science stream, starting in Grade 4 through to the workforce.

    Release date: 2002-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016162
    Description:

    During the design of the recently piloted Knowledge Management Practices Survey, analysts at Statistics Canada undertook a series of cognitive tests with potential respondents. Read about some of the results of the tests conducted.

    Release date: 2002-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016151
    Description:

    In recent years, comparing national innovative performances has become increasingly important as countries recognize the importance of innovation for economic growth.

    Release date: 2002-02-15

Reference (12)

Reference (12) (12 of 12 results)

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002013
    Description:

    Statistics Canada conducted the Survey of Innovation 1999 in the fall of 1999. It surveyed manufacturing and was the first survey to study innovation in selected natural resource industries. This publication is part of a series of working papers based largely on the Survey of Innovation 1999. It uses a systems approach to understanding innovation in the mineral sector with a focus on metal ore mining. It also describes a model for the mineral sector system. Descriptive statistics and statistical tables present data for some of the industries included in the system including an analysis of the type of innovation and the innovative activities of mining firms. The publication examines information sources for innovation, objectives of innovation, and firm success factors. Data from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology 2000 are used to explore how improved technologies were introduced to firms.

    Release date: 2002-07-23

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002011
    Description:

    This publication is part of a series of working papers based on Statistics Canada's Survey of Innovation 1999. It was the first study of innovations in selected natural resource industries. The survey uses a systems approach to understanding advances in the forest sector and describes a model for the Forest Sector System. Descriptive statistics and statistical tables present data for some of the industries included in the system. The text explores innovations produced by forest sector firms, the objectives of the innovations, as well as how knowledge is generated and transmitted within this system.

    Release date: 2002-06-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002012
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's Survey of Innovation 1999 surveyed manufacturing in the fall of 1999. It was the first innovation survey of selected natural resource industries. This paper is part of a series of working papers based on the Survey of Innovation 1999. This paper details the survey methodology, including decisions taken and lessons learned regarding survey design.

    Release date: 2002-06-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002009
    Description:

    This paper is based on information from the 2000 Survey of Electronic Commence and Technology (SECT) and explores organizational and technological changes in the domestic private sector between 1998 and 2000. The discussion contrasts the adoption rates of goods producing industries with service producing industries. The text also discusses the impact of employment size on adoption rates within these two sectors.

    Information includes rates for training, subsequent to the introduction of organizational or technological change, followed by the type of technological change. Finally, data are broken down by major industrial group, within the goods producing and services producing sectors.

    Release date: 2002-06-17

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002010
    Description:

    This document presents historical tables displaying federal government expenditures and personnel data applied to activities in science and technology. Expenditures and personnel for each fiscal year to 1999-2000 are actual while the data for 2000-2001 and 2001-2002 are forecasts and estimates respectively.

    Release date: 2002-06-17

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002007
    Description:

    This working paper reports on aggregate Canadian health research and development (R&D) and contains basic definitions and methodology. The statistical data are presented in a funder-performer matrix. Canadian health research is performed in universities, teaching hospitals, business enterprises, government laboratories and private non-profit organizations. This research is funded from a variety of sources including public, private, domestic and foreign donors.

    This is the third time the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division (SIEID) of Statistics Canada has published an estimate of spending on health R&D in Canada.

    Release date: 2002-05-31

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002008
    Description:

    This document reports on the geographical distribution of federal government expenditures on science and technology. The statistics of this report supplements data that were published in the service bulletin "Science Statistics", Vol. 25 no. 12 (catalogue no. 88-001-XIB). Included are tables that show the expenditures and staff of federal government scientific establishments for the fiscal year 1999/2000.

    Release date: 2002-05-31

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002006
    Description:

    The results of this pilot Knowledge Management Practices Survey indicate that most firms are managing some aspect of their knowledge. At present it appears that firms are more actively managing the transfer and sharing of knowledge within the firm and external knowledge that could directly bear on their markets. Knowledge management practices are seen as important tools in improving firms' competitive advantage and as a manner to unite workers in the goals of firms' strategic objectives. In fact, the majority of reasons found to be most important to the firms show a slant towards internalising knowledge and protecting the knowledge in place. Very few of the practices in use or the reasons or results of using the knowledge management practices indicated a strong willingness on the part of firms to share their knowledge with competitors or between work-sites.

    Release date: 2002-04-19

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002005
    Description:

    The information in this document is intended primarily to be used by scientific and technological (S&T) policy makers, both federal and provincial, largely as a basis for interprovincial and intersectoral comparisons.

    The statistics are aggregates of the provincial government science surveys conducted by Statistics Canada under contract with the provinces, and cover the period 1992-1993 to 2000-2001.

    Release date: 2002-04-10

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002003
    Description:

    This is the final of three papers providing data and an overview of the results of the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey - 1999. Readers are encouraged to use the data. The next edition of the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey - 2001 is expected to be administered in the spring of 2002 with results available early in 2003.

    Release date: 2002-03-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002004
    Description:

    Spin-off firms made up over 34% of the core group of firms from the 1999 biotechnology survey. They also made up over 112 of the 270 small (under 50 employees) size firms, by far the largest group of core biotechnology, and half of the human health related firms, the largest sector of biotechnology firms. Central to this paper is the question: What are the general characteristics of this sub-group of core biotechnology firms?

    Release date: 2002-03-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002001
    Description:

    This paper is based on information from the 2000 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) (see Appendix for more details on the survey) and concentrates on the introduction of organisational and technological change in the public sector. To provide context, comparisons are made to the rates of introduction of organisational and technological change in the private sector. Rates of organisational and technological change in the public sector by employment size groups are presented. Finally, the paper concludes with a look at these changes in the public sector based on industrial classification.

    Release date: 2002-01-31

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