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All (47)

All (47) (25 of 47 results)

  • Table: 88-001-X20030087875
    Description:

    This bulletin presents recent information on the performance and funding of Federal government expenditures on scientific activities, 2003-2004. The statistics presented are derived from the survey of science and technology (S&T) activities of federal departments and agencies. The data in this publication are consistent with expenditures of departments and agencies as reported in the Main Estimates 2003-2004, but do not reflect changes to 2003-2004 spending plans which may result from supplementary estimates or other departmental planning decisions.

    Release date: 2003-12-11

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003013
    Description:

    This paper used data from the 2001 Biotechnology Use and Development Survey (BUDS) to look into bioproduct development using biotechnologies. Results show that the development of bioproducts has become an intrinsic part of the activities of Canadian biotechnology firms.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200311113104
    Description:

    This paper looks at the high-tech sector in 2002, a year after high-profile layoffs were made in response to the collapse in demand for its products and services.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003010
    Description:

    Canadian health research is conducted in universities, teaching hospitals, business enterprises, government laboratories and private non-profit organizations. This research is funded from a variety of sources including public, private, domestic and foreign.

    This paper provides more detailed information than was previously released in Science Statistics (Catalogue no. 88-001, vol. 27, no. 6). This is the fourth time the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division (SIEID) of Statistics Canada has published an estimate of health research and development spending in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-11-07

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003011
    Description:

    Canada's economic growth and competitiveness depends on scientific and technological development, as well as the people responsible for this development, especially those engaged in research and development (R&D). The number of R&D personnel is a supplementary measure to the statistics on intramural expenditures on R&D.

    In this report, we present some statistical estimates and definitions concerning R&D personnel. Data on R&D personnel are derived from surveys and from estimates based on various data sources.

    Release date: 2003-11-07

  • Table: 88-001-X20030077876
    Description:

    Canada's economic competitiveness depends on scientific and technological development and also on the people responsible for this development, especially those engaged in Research and development. The number of Research and development personnel is a supplementary measure to the statistics on intramural expenditures on Research and development. The Frascati Manual1 states that "Data on the utilisation of scientific and technical personnel provide concrete measurements for international comparisons of resources devoted to Research and development "

    Release date: 2003-11-07

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003012
    Description:

    In 2001, Statistics Canada conducted the third Survey of Intellectual Property Commercialization in the Higher Education Sector, which was designed to illuminate the overall process of intellectual property (IP) management. Over 100 universities, degree-granting colleges and affiliated research hospitals took part in this voluntary survey. The results show that over 60% of institutions are actively managing (identifying, protecting, promoting and/or commercializing) their IP. Royalties from licensing increased from $18.9 million in 1999 to $44.4 million in 2001. To date, universities and research hospitals have created a total of 680 spin-off companies.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036650
    Description:

    The trend towards the globalization of factor, product and financial markets is drawing an increasing amount of attention. Work is underway to develop methodologies and to harmonize among countries data on the economic activities of globally operating corporations. An understanding of their business models, corporate strategies and organizational structures is also needed to gather and, more importantly, interpret information about their innovation activities. This note identifies four main models of globally operating corporations according to their impact on technology transfer and innovation in their host countries.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036659
    Description:

    One of the most commonly used measures of research and development (R&D) performance is the GERD/GDP ratio or total R&D expenditures (Gross Domestic Expenditures on Research and Development) as a percentage of Gross Domestic Product (GDP). How does Canada compare with the other members of the G-7 and the OECD in terms of its GERD/GDP ratio? From 1989 to 1999, Canada reported the highest level of growth among G-7 countries.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036655
    Description:

    Although there were over 8,000 companies in Canada reporting research and development (R&D) expenditures in 2000, only 30 of these accounted for over half of all business R&D spending. The result is that only a small number of companies in key industries have a significant impact on Canada's total $11.4 billion business R&D spending. The highest levels of concentration of R&D spending were found in the communications equipment manufacturing sector, while computer systems design and related services showed the lowest.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036654
    Description:

    Many people in the federal and provincial governments, in universities, hospitals and other organizations are asking the same questions about the commercialization of university research: Is it increasing? What are the benefits? How do universities and regions compare? Statistics Canada's 2001 Survey of Intellectual Property Commercialization in the Higher Education Sector shows that commercialization activities took a giant leap from 1999 to 2001. This article includes the results for universities only.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036651
    Description:

    Many small businesses and Canadian households are now beginning to embrace broadband technologies. Nearly one-half (48.7%) of Canadian households that regularly use the Internet from home have a broadband connection, while the majority of business enterprises accessing the Internet (58.4%) also use broadband technologies.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036660
    Description:

    The federal science and technology (S&T) community is made up of numerous government departments and agencies with distinct mandates and specializations, all united by their need for skilled, committed, innovative S&T professionals. The new website at www.sciencetech.gc.ca offers a comprehensive view of what they do. Here's where you can learn more about some of the remarkable achievements of Canada's S&T community, and about the exciting scope of its continuing work.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036656
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's Survey of Innovation 1999 collected information on the innovation activities of firms in Canadian manufacturing and selected natural resource industries. The results provide insight into why a firm chooses to take the path of innovation or opts to be a non-innovator. For most non-innovators, the perception is that innovation is not required or is irrelevant to their industry. Non-innovative firms analysed here are those that did not introduce a new or significantly improved product or process in the previous three years and that did not carry out any innovative activities during the survey period.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036661
    Description:

    On July 9, 2003, Statistics Canada announced a new Internet publication Updates on Economic Analysis (Catalogue no. 11-623-XIE, free). The publication provides a concise summary of ongoing research programs in micro-economics and national accounts. For each theme, the purpose and scope of the research program are described, along with the major analytical issues that are addressed in supporting studies. It also presents a summary of major findings.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Table: 88-001-X20030067877
    Description:

    Expenditures on Health research and development are growing as a percentage of Gross Domestic Expenditure on Research and Development (GERD). GERD includes expenditure in the natural sciences and engineering and in the social sciences and humanities fields. This service bulletin presents details of expenditure on Health R&D performance and funding.

    Release date: 2003-09-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2003003
    Description:

    This report compares employment growth in information and communications technology (ICT) industries and science-based industries across provinces, urban and rural regions and census metropolitan areas (CMAs).

    Release date: 2003-07-31

  • Table: 88-001-X20030057878
    Description:

    The statistics in this bulletin are derived from the 2001 survey of industrial research and development activities in Canada, which covers firms spending a million dollars or more on the performance or funding of research and development in Canada, and from the administrative data of the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency (CCRA) for firms which spend less than a million dollars on the performance or funding of research and development

    Release date: 2003-07-24

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026560
    Description:

    Food processing is one of Canada's largest manufacturing industries, consisting of more than 3,000 establishments. Employing close to 230,000 people in 1998, it boasted a gross domestic product of $15 billion that same year. The relationship between the use of advanced manufacturing technology and firm performance during the 1990s, as measured by growth in labour productivity and growth in market share, is the subject of a recently released Statistics Canada study, which finds that a high-technology orientation is closely associated with success.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026561
    Description:

    Nanotechnology is an emerging technology. Has it reached the point that warrants the development of a comprehensive statistical measurement program? If so, what indicators should be used? Major spending initiatives in nanotechnology investing are currently underway. There is precedence for using developed methods and techniques to address the questions 'who,' 'what,' 'where' and 'why.' Statistics Canada's experience may be invaluable in the development of a nanotechnology statistical program.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026571
    Description:

    This article presents the results of a study that looks at the characteristics of Canadian biotechnology firms that form strategic alliances and measures the impact that such alliances have on their performance indicators.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026570
    Description:

    In 2001, Canadian biotech firms raised $980 million in financing capital, a sharp drop from the $2.1 billion raised in 1999. Overall, 114 firms out of 188 (61%) that attempted to raise capital either failed or did not reach their targets. Why are biotech firms encountering difficulties in raising financing capital?

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Table: 88-001-X20030047882
    Description:

    Biotechnology is an enabling technology - one that has been compared to electricity or microelectronics - because it has the potential to transform production processes, products and services in a wide range of sectors of the economy. At present, major applications of biotechnology are taking place in health, agrifood, and natural resources (e.g. forestry and mining). This survey is intended to quantify the level of industrial activity in biotechnology Research and Development by sector of application and to reveal trends in spending.

    Release date: 2003-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2003012
    Description:

    This paper investigates the evolution of industrial structure in the Canadian food processing sector and its relationship to technological change. It uses 1998 special survey data on advanced technology use, plant characteristics and plant performance.

    Release date: 2003-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2003001
    Description:

    This report focusses on new studies that analyse information and communications technology industries, science-based industries, high-technology industries and firms, the knowledge-based economy, and knowledge workers.

    Release date: 2003-05-15

Data (8)

Data (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Table: 88-001-X20030087875
    Description:

    This bulletin presents recent information on the performance and funding of Federal government expenditures on scientific activities, 2003-2004. The statistics presented are derived from the survey of science and technology (S&T) activities of federal departments and agencies. The data in this publication are consistent with expenditures of departments and agencies as reported in the Main Estimates 2003-2004, but do not reflect changes to 2003-2004 spending plans which may result from supplementary estimates or other departmental planning decisions.

    Release date: 2003-12-11

  • Table: 88-001-X20030077876
    Description:

    Canada's economic competitiveness depends on scientific and technological development and also on the people responsible for this development, especially those engaged in Research and development. The number of Research and development personnel is a supplementary measure to the statistics on intramural expenditures on Research and development. The Frascati Manual1 states that "Data on the utilisation of scientific and technical personnel provide concrete measurements for international comparisons of resources devoted to Research and development "

    Release date: 2003-11-07

  • Table: 88-001-X20030067877
    Description:

    Expenditures on Health research and development are growing as a percentage of Gross Domestic Expenditure on Research and Development (GERD). GERD includes expenditure in the natural sciences and engineering and in the social sciences and humanities fields. This service bulletin presents details of expenditure on Health R&D performance and funding.

    Release date: 2003-09-22

  • Table: 88-001-X20030057878
    Description:

    The statistics in this bulletin are derived from the 2001 survey of industrial research and development activities in Canada, which covers firms spending a million dollars or more on the performance or funding of research and development in Canada, and from the administrative data of the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency (CCRA) for firms which spend less than a million dollars on the performance or funding of research and development

    Release date: 2003-07-24

  • Table: 88-001-X20030047882
    Description:

    Biotechnology is an enabling technology - one that has been compared to electricity or microelectronics - because it has the potential to transform production processes, products and services in a wide range of sectors of the economy. At present, major applications of biotechnology are taking place in health, agrifood, and natural resources (e.g. forestry and mining). This survey is intended to quantify the level of industrial activity in biotechnology Research and Development by sector of application and to reveal trends in spending.

    Release date: 2003-06-05

  • Table: 88-001-X20030037883
    Description:

    This service bulletin presents the geographic distribution of federal government science and technology expenditures. Data on federal government expenditures on science and technology are found in Volume 26 No. 5 of this publication series, released in October 2002. In both this and the earlier bulletin, science and technology (S&T) expenditures are the sum of expenditures on research and development (R&D) and on related scientific activities (RSA).

    Release date: 2003-03-14

  • Table: 88-001-X20030027884
    Description:

    The provincial government sector consists of all provincial government departments, ministries and agencies and provincial research organizations. The Provincial Research Organizations (PRO) are surveyed separately and are not reported here. The PRO values are reported in Volume 26, number 8 of this serie.

    Release date: 2003-02-26

  • Table: 88-001-X20030017885
    Description:

    Data on science and technology (S&T) expenditures and person-years allocated to biotechnology for the year 2001-2002 were collected from selected federal departments and agencies. The criterion for selection was significant activity in this field. Survey results contribute to the work of the Canadian Biotechnology Strategy.

    Release date: 2003-02-07

Analysis (23)

Analysis (23) (23 of 23 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200311113104
    Description:

    This paper looks at the high-tech sector in 2002, a year after high-profile layoffs were made in response to the collapse in demand for its products and services.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036650
    Description:

    The trend towards the globalization of factor, product and financial markets is drawing an increasing amount of attention. Work is underway to develop methodologies and to harmonize among countries data on the economic activities of globally operating corporations. An understanding of their business models, corporate strategies and organizational structures is also needed to gather and, more importantly, interpret information about their innovation activities. This note identifies four main models of globally operating corporations according to their impact on technology transfer and innovation in their host countries.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036659
    Description:

    One of the most commonly used measures of research and development (R&D) performance is the GERD/GDP ratio or total R&D expenditures (Gross Domestic Expenditures on Research and Development) as a percentage of Gross Domestic Product (GDP). How does Canada compare with the other members of the G-7 and the OECD in terms of its GERD/GDP ratio? From 1989 to 1999, Canada reported the highest level of growth among G-7 countries.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036655
    Description:

    Although there were over 8,000 companies in Canada reporting research and development (R&D) expenditures in 2000, only 30 of these accounted for over half of all business R&D spending. The result is that only a small number of companies in key industries have a significant impact on Canada's total $11.4 billion business R&D spending. The highest levels of concentration of R&D spending were found in the communications equipment manufacturing sector, while computer systems design and related services showed the lowest.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036654
    Description:

    Many people in the federal and provincial governments, in universities, hospitals and other organizations are asking the same questions about the commercialization of university research: Is it increasing? What are the benefits? How do universities and regions compare? Statistics Canada's 2001 Survey of Intellectual Property Commercialization in the Higher Education Sector shows that commercialization activities took a giant leap from 1999 to 2001. This article includes the results for universities only.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036651
    Description:

    Many small businesses and Canadian households are now beginning to embrace broadband technologies. Nearly one-half (48.7%) of Canadian households that regularly use the Internet from home have a broadband connection, while the majority of business enterprises accessing the Internet (58.4%) also use broadband technologies.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036660
    Description:

    The federal science and technology (S&T) community is made up of numerous government departments and agencies with distinct mandates and specializations, all united by their need for skilled, committed, innovative S&T professionals. The new website at www.sciencetech.gc.ca offers a comprehensive view of what they do. Here's where you can learn more about some of the remarkable achievements of Canada's S&T community, and about the exciting scope of its continuing work.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036656
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's Survey of Innovation 1999 collected information on the innovation activities of firms in Canadian manufacturing and selected natural resource industries. The results provide insight into why a firm chooses to take the path of innovation or opts to be a non-innovator. For most non-innovators, the perception is that innovation is not required or is irrelevant to their industry. Non-innovative firms analysed here are those that did not introduce a new or significantly improved product or process in the previous three years and that did not carry out any innovative activities during the survey period.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036661
    Description:

    On July 9, 2003, Statistics Canada announced a new Internet publication Updates on Economic Analysis (Catalogue no. 11-623-XIE, free). The publication provides a concise summary of ongoing research programs in micro-economics and national accounts. For each theme, the purpose and scope of the research program are described, along with the major analytical issues that are addressed in supporting studies. It also presents a summary of major findings.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2003003
    Description:

    This report compares employment growth in information and communications technology (ICT) industries and science-based industries across provinces, urban and rural regions and census metropolitan areas (CMAs).

    Release date: 2003-07-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026560
    Description:

    Food processing is one of Canada's largest manufacturing industries, consisting of more than 3,000 establishments. Employing close to 230,000 people in 1998, it boasted a gross domestic product of $15 billion that same year. The relationship between the use of advanced manufacturing technology and firm performance during the 1990s, as measured by growth in labour productivity and growth in market share, is the subject of a recently released Statistics Canada study, which finds that a high-technology orientation is closely associated with success.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026561
    Description:

    Nanotechnology is an emerging technology. Has it reached the point that warrants the development of a comprehensive statistical measurement program? If so, what indicators should be used? Major spending initiatives in nanotechnology investing are currently underway. There is precedence for using developed methods and techniques to address the questions 'who,' 'what,' 'where' and 'why.' Statistics Canada's experience may be invaluable in the development of a nanotechnology statistical program.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026571
    Description:

    This article presents the results of a study that looks at the characteristics of Canadian biotechnology firms that form strategic alliances and measures the impact that such alliances have on their performance indicators.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026570
    Description:

    In 2001, Canadian biotech firms raised $980 million in financing capital, a sharp drop from the $2.1 billion raised in 1999. Overall, 114 firms out of 188 (61%) that attempted to raise capital either failed or did not reach their targets. Why are biotech firms encountering difficulties in raising financing capital?

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2003012
    Description:

    This paper investigates the evolution of industrial structure in the Canadian food processing sector and its relationship to technological change. It uses 1998 special survey data on advanced technology use, plant characteristics and plant performance.

    Release date: 2003-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2003001
    Description:

    This report focusses on new studies that analyse information and communications technology industries, science-based industries, high-technology industries and firms, the knowledge-based economy, and knowledge workers.

    Release date: 2003-05-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2003002
    Description:

    This report analyses the growth of information and communications technology (ICT) industries and science-based industries. It includes statistics on gross domestic product (GDP), employment, productivity, profitability, knowledge workers, investments in research and development, and expenditures on information and communications technology.

    Release date: 2003-05-15

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030016475
    Description:

    Data from the 2001 Biotechnology Use and Development Survey show that human resources in biotechnology increased substantially between 1999 and 2001. In this article, we attempt to answer two questions: What are the characteristics of the human resources engaged in the biotechnology field in Canada? Moreover, what are the main factors that contributed to the growth of these human resources in 2001?

    Release date: 2003-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030016476
    Description:

    Canadian biotechnology is gaining momentum. More firms are getting their products onto the markets and increasing revenues. With the human health sector leading the way, biotechnology revenues rose by a massive 343% for the 1997 to 2001 period, reaching $3.5 billion in 2001. During this same period, the number of firms increased by 33%.

    Release date: 2003-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030016468
    Description:

    New small firms with more long-term debt in their balance sheets tend to devote a smaller percentage of their investment expenditure to research and development. A recent Statistics Canada study on financing innovation in new small firms provides insight into an important segment of the small-firm population, namely successful entrants.

    Release date: 2003-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030016474
    Description:

    In 2001, there were 375 biotechnology innovator firms in Canada, an increase of just under 5% from the 358 firms in 1999. Analysis beyond these overall statistics discloses a dynamic churning that is occurring among sectors, provinces and size groups.

    Release date: 2003-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030016473
    Description:

    Studies by Statistics Canada (www.statcan.gc.ca) helps you search and find all analytical studies (free or for sale) published by Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2003-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030016469
    Description:

    Once viewed as weak in research and development (R&D) capabilities, the service sector in Canada is emerging as an increasingly attractive place for foreign-controlled firms to practice R&D. This is a reflection of the increasing technological opportunities and expertise offered by the service sector. Multinational corporations often undertake R&D abroad to acquire new insights or apply the knowledge they already have to foreign markets.

    Release date: 2003-02-18

Reference (16)

Reference (16) (16 of 16 results)

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003013
    Description:

    This paper used data from the 2001 Biotechnology Use and Development Survey (BUDS) to look into bioproduct development using biotechnologies. Results show that the development of bioproducts has become an intrinsic part of the activities of Canadian biotechnology firms.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003010
    Description:

    Canadian health research is conducted in universities, teaching hospitals, business enterprises, government laboratories and private non-profit organizations. This research is funded from a variety of sources including public, private, domestic and foreign.

    This paper provides more detailed information than was previously released in Science Statistics (Catalogue no. 88-001, vol. 27, no. 6). This is the fourth time the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division (SIEID) of Statistics Canada has published an estimate of health research and development spending in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-11-07

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003011
    Description:

    Canada's economic growth and competitiveness depends on scientific and technological development, as well as the people responsible for this development, especially those engaged in research and development (R&D). The number of R&D personnel is a supplementary measure to the statistics on intramural expenditures on R&D.

    In this report, we present some statistical estimates and definitions concerning R&D personnel. Data on R&D personnel are derived from surveys and from estimates based on various data sources.

    Release date: 2003-11-07

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003012
    Description:

    In 2001, Statistics Canada conducted the third Survey of Intellectual Property Commercialization in the Higher Education Sector, which was designed to illuminate the overall process of intellectual property (IP) management. Over 100 universities, degree-granting colleges and affiliated research hospitals took part in this voluntary survey. The results show that over 60% of institutions are actively managing (identifying, protecting, promoting and/or commercializing) their IP. Royalties from licensing increased from $18.9 million in 1999 to $44.4 million in 2001. To date, universities and research hospitals have created a total of 680 spin-off companies.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003009
    Description:

    This document presents historical tables displaying Federal Government expenditures and personnel applied to activities in science and technology. The expenditures and personnel for the 2000/01 fiscal year are actual while the data for the 2001/02 and 2002/03 fiscal years are forecasts and estimates, respectively.

    Release date: 2003-05-08

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003008
    Description:

    This document presents the geographical distribution of Federal Government expenditures on science and technology (S&T) for the years 1994/95 to 2000/2001.

    Release date: 2003-05-05

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003005
    Description:

    The main indicators of biotechnology activities in Canada are presented in this article. The data are from the 2001 Biotechnology Use and Development Survey. Within the last few years, except for the amount of financing capital raised, an increase in all the indicators was noticed. For example, the number of innovative firms involved in biotechnology activities rose from 358 in 1999 to 375 in 2001. The Human Health sector outpaces all the other sectors in terms of the number of firms, human resources, biotechnology revenues, biotechnology research and development expenditures, amount of financing capital raised, and the number of products in the pipeline. Contrary to medium-sized and large firms where the personnel is more homogenous, small firms employ mostly highly-qualified workers. The 2001 data show a maturing trend in small firms. Most firms could not hire enough people to fill all their vacancies (estimated at 953 positions in Canada) for the 2001 year.

    Release date: 2003-03-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003006
    Description:

    This working paper is based on a speech delivered by Judith Maxwell, President of the Canadian Policy Research Networks. In her discourse, Ms. Maxwell challenged her listeners to 'think outside of the box' on innovation and to be creative in how they approached the topic. For her, innovation extends beyond economic activities into societal interactions and culture. Therefore, innovation translates into more than productivity growth and improved efficiency, but also better living, working and learning conditions.

    Release date: 2003-03-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003007
    Description:

    This article presents findings from a 2001 Canadian pilot survey on the use of knowledge management practices by firms. Of the firms surveyed, 9 out of 10 firms reported using at least 1 of the 23 knowledge management practices that were studied. This survey, a world first by a statistical agency, measured the extent to which knowledge management practices were used by Canadian businesses in forestry and logging; chemical manufacturing; transportation equipment manufacturing; machinery, equipment and supply wholesaler-distributors; and management, scientific and technical consulting services. The reasons for and the results of using knowledge management practices, as well as the practices themselves, are examined by firm size and by type of adopter.

    Release date: 2003-03-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003004
    Description:

    The statistics in this document are aggregates of the provincial government science surveys conducted by Statistics Canada under contract with the provinces, and cover the period 1993/94 to 2001/02.

    Release date: 2003-03-17

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003003
    Description:

    Results show that biotechnology companies in Canada are experiencing rapid growth and that Statistics Canada is now capturing more biotechnology activity. For example, between 1997 and 1999, Canadian biotechnology firms grew in number with core biotechnology firms increasing from 282 firms to 358. They brought in $1.9 billion in biotechnology revenues in 1999, compared with $813 million in 1997; they spent around $827 million on biotechnology research and development in 1999, compared with $494 million in 1997.

    Release date: 2003-03-10

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003001
    Description:

    This paper provides a review of the GERD/GDP ratio and other measures of R&D intensity. Canada is compared with two groups of countries: the other members of the G7 and a group of countries in the OECD that reported significantly improved R&D performance over the period 1989 to 1999.

    Release date: 2003-02-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002017
    Description:

    This paper is an exploratory study to help us identify and characterize innovation practices in Canada's dynamic service industries. It uses logistical estimates to demonstrate that innovation in the services sector is not homogeneous. For each type of innovation 'product, process or both. there is a different business strategy. Small firms do more product innovation, and clients, along with fairs and exhibitions, appear to be the primary sources of information.

    Product innovation is generally done by technical services industries. Process innovation does not seem to favour any particular sector but, understandably, the factors that have the most impact on this type of innovation are company flexibility and information from patent literature, consulting firms and internal management. The most complex strategy-for both product and process innovation-is associated with large firms in the communications and finance sub-sectors. This type of innovation has a larger number of significant factors than the other two types. Finally, this paper shows that there are differences among the forms of innovation and that these differences apply within individual sub-sectors.

    Release date: 2003-01-15

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002016
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation 1999 was conducted in the fall of 1999. It surveyed the manufacturing field and was the first innovation survey of selected natural resource industries.

    This is part of a series of working papers based on the Survey of Innovation 1999. Previous working papers include an examination of national estimates of innovation in manufacturing and statistical tables of provincial estimates of innovation in manufacturing.

    This document includes a description of survey methodology, as well as statistical tables for manufacturing industries at the national level for all non write-in questions from the Survey of Innovation 1999 questionnaire.

    Tables present survey results on the following subjects: competitive environment; firm success factors; percentage of innovative firms; unsuccessful or not yet completed innovation projects; activities linked to innovation; sources of information; objectives; problems and obstacles; impact; cooperative and collaborative arrangements; most important innovation; building and construction products; natural resource products; research and development; intellectual property; human resources; andgovernment support programs.

    Release date: 2003-01-13

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002014
    Description:

    This publication provides an explanation of the estimation procedures used to calculate research and development (R & D) expenditures in the higher education sector for 2000-2001.

    Release date: 2003-01-10

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002015
    Description:

    This publication presents the national gross domestic expenditures on research and development (GERD) from 1991 to 2002, as well as the provincial GERD from 1991 to 2000. Up until 1985, GERD included research and development (R&D) expenditures in just the Natural Sciences and Engineering (NSE) field. Beginning in 1985, Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) activities were also included in GERD. An additional series of tables, showing R&D expenditures at the national level in either science from 1963 to 1990 or at the provincial level from 1979 to 1990, may be obtained from the Science and Innovation Surveys Section of the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division.

    Release date: 2003-01-10

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