Statistics by subject – Women and gender

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Survey or statistical program

32 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Survey or statistical program

32 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Survey or statistical program

32 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Survey or statistical program

32 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (128)

All (128) (25 of 128 results)

Data (33)

Data (33) (25 of 33 results)

  • Table: 85-404-X
    Description:

    This set of fact sheets present national, provincial and territorial data on shelters that provide residential services to abused women and their children. The highlighted information includes profiles of the facilities and services provided, as well as characteristics of residents. Data for these fact sheets are from the Transition Home Survey (THS), a biennial census of all facilities in Canada known to provide residential services to abused women and their children. The THS is conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics as part of the federal government's Family Violence Initiative and collects information on the characteristics of the facilities and the services provided during a 12-month period. Additionally, through the use of a snapshot day survey (mid-April of the collection year), selected characteristics of residents (i.e., reasons for coming to the shelter, relationship to abuser, repeat stays, etc.) are collected.

    Release date: 2011-10-25

  • Table: 89-640-X
    Description:

    This publication contains tables on civic and political participation, sense of belonging to Canada, and unpaid work. The source of the data is the 2008 General Social Survey, Cycle 22: Social Networks. This cycle collected information on changes respondents had experienced in the last 12 months, the resources they used during these transitions and unmet needs for help. Questions were also asked on contact with family and friends, volunteering and trust in people and institutions.

    Release date: 2009-06-26

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008644
    Description:

    Recently, through the General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization, questions related to spousal violence against women and men were repeated. Results of this survey permit the analysis of how spousal violence has changed in nature and extent over the two cycles of the survey from and, for the first time, provide trends on male spousal violence. As will be highlighted in this chapter, the GSS illustrates that overall spousal violence rates have remained stable, but violence in previous relationships has decreased for both women and men and continues to be more common than in current relationships. In addition, the data continue to show that violence is more prevalent in common-law relationships than in marital unions, and although relatively equal proportions of women and men report some type of spousal violence, women continue to suffer more serious and repeated spousal violence than do men and incur more serious consequences as a result of this violence.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008645
    Description:

    In the past decade, four large-scale victimization surveys have been conducted to obtain national population estimates of stalking. These surveys have been carried out in the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia and Canada. For the first time in Statistics Canada measured stalking through the General Social Survey on Victimization (GSS). The present analysis details the prevalence of stalking in Canada, describing victim characteristics, victim'offender relationships, types of stalking experienced, violent stalking relationships, help-seeking behaviour of stalking victims, emotional consequences of stalking, reasons for reporting or not reporting the stalking to the police, types of charges laid against stalkers, and the use and breach of restraining orders.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20040006982
    Description:

    Societal recognition of the problem of domestic violence has led to an overall shift in the criminal justice system's response to violence in spousal relationships, as well as the implementation of prevention and intervention initiatives at the community level over the past number of decades. Furthermore, research conducted by governments and academics has allowed us to gain a better understanding of the nature and extent of violence, the risk factors associated with spousal violence, and the characteristics of victims and offenders.

    Release date: 2004-07-06

  • Table: 85-224-X20040006985
    Description:

    Using data from the Homicide Survey, this chapter examines the prevalence of and trends in family homicide .It also explores the circumstances surrounding homicides, and the demographic characteristics of accused persons and victims. Finally, information on the aftermath of family homicide will be presented by examining what happened to the accused following the homicide.

    Release date: 2004-07-06

  • Table: 85-224-X20030006541
    Description:

    This chapter focusses on the nature and extent of spousal violence and on the police response to incidents reported to them.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • Table: 85-224-X20020006455
    Description:

    The 1999 General Social Survey was the first attempt by Statistics Canada to measure spousal violence in a comprehensive way on a traditional victimization survey. Both women and men were asked a module of 10 questions concerning violence by their current or previous spouses and common-law partners. The nature of the violence under study ranged in severity from threats to sexual assault and concerned acts that happened in the 12-month and 5-year periods preceding the survey interview.

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006462
    Description:

    The 1999 General Social Survey was the first attempt by Statistics Canada to measure spousal violence in a comprehensive way on a traditional victimization survey. Both women and men were asked a module of 10 questions concerning violence by their current or previous spouses and common-law partners. The nature of the violence under study ranged in severity from threats to sexual assault, and it concerned acts that happened in the 12-month and 5-year periods preceding the survey interview.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20000005249
    Description:

    The incidence and prevalence of spousal violence was measured through the 1999 General Social Survey. Both women and men were asked a module of ten questions concerning violence by their current and/or previous spouses and common-law partners. The nature of the violence under study ranged in seriousness from threats to sexual assault and concerned acts that happened in the 12-month and 5-year period proceeding the survey interview.

    Release date: 2000-07-25

  • Table: 85-224-X20000005251
    Description:

    For many years now, various levels of governments and community organizations have put considerable effort into reducing the level of family violence. An important question for these groups and for society in general is whether the prevalence of spousal violence has changed in recent years.

    Release date: 2000-07-25

  • Table: 85-224-X20000005259
    Description:

    From 1979 to 1998, there were 12,767 victims of homicide in Canada. One-third of the victims were killed by family members, another 36% were committed by acquaintances, and 12% by strangers.

    Release date: 2000-07-25

  • Table: 85-224-X20000005253
    Description:

    There are currently 164 police forces in 7 provinces that participate in this Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR2) Survey, representing nearly one half (46%) of the national volume of reported crime. Although UCR2 data are not nationally representative, they provide useful descriptive information about the type of crimes that come to the attention of the police.

    Release date: 2000-07-25

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005313
    Description:

    From 1978 to 1997 there were 12,871 victims of homicide in Canada. Family members were responsible for nearly one-third (31%) of these, another 39% were committed by acquaintances, and 12% by strangers. Throughout the period, women and girls were most likely to be killed by a family member (50%), whereas, men and boys were most likely to be killed by acquaintances (46%).

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005307
    Description:

    The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics has been tracking trends in crimes reported to the police since 1962 through the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005306
    Description:

    In Canada, there are a variety of data sources that can be used to examine the nature and extent of family violence. These fall into two general categories: victimization survey data based on victims' accounts of their experiences of family violence reported to survey interviewers, and those based on incidents reported to the police, hospitals, coroners, chlid welfare or other social agencies.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Table: 85-224-X19980005290
    Description:

    Homicide is the most tragic form of family violence. Between 1977 and 1996, there were 12,666 victims of homicide in Canada. One-third involved victims and offenders who were related to each other by marriage, common-law union or kinship, another 49% involved acquaintances and 17% involved strangers.

    Release date: 1998-05-28

Analysis (93)

Analysis (93) (25 of 93 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-503-X
    Description:

    Understanding the role of women in Canadian society and how it has changed over time is dependent on having information that can begin to shed light on the diverse circumstances and experiences of women. Women in Canada provides an unparalleled compilation of data related to women's family status, education, employment, economic well-being, unpaid work, health, and more.

    Women in Canada allows readers to better understand the experience of women compared to that of men. Recognizing that women are not a homogenous group and that experiences differ not only across gender but also within gender groups, Women in Canada includes chapters on immigrant women, women in a visible minority, Aboriginal women, senior women, and women with participation and activity limitations.

    Release date: 2017-06-06

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114785
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada explores the criminal victimization of women and girls as well as their involvement in the criminal justice system as offenders. It covers the types of criminal victimization experienced by females over time; where possible, highlighting important differences in violent crime by Aboriginal identity, immigrant status, visible minority status and age. The use of formal and informal support services is explored, including changes over time in the use of police services. This chapter also reports trends in the number and types of crimes committed by females, along with their involvement in the criminal courts and correctional systems.

    Release date: 2017-06-06

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114695
    Description:

    The chapter entitled "Women with Disabilities" provides a socioeconomic profile of people with disabilities from a gender-based perspective. The prevalence of disability among women, compared with men, is examined across age groups, regions, disability types, and living arrangements. Other areas examined include the use of aids, assistive devices, and medications; help needed; and use of public and specialized transit. Lastly, the education, employment, and income characteristics of persons with disabilities are compared with persons without disabilities.

    Release date: 2017-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114694
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada examines women's labour market experiences in comparison to those of men and, where relevant, explores how they have evolved over time. Specifically, historical trends in participation, employment, and unemployment rates are documented. Then, using the most recent data available, employment patterns across a variety of personal and work characteristics are considered: province; educational attainment; marital status; parental status and age of youngest child/ren in the household; lone parenthood; work hours; self-employment; sector of employment (i.e., public or private); "precarious" (i.e., part-time and/or temporary) employment; industry; and occupation. Gender wage differentials are also explored within and between educational and occupational groups. Turning to unemployment, patterns by age, province, and reasons for job leaving/losing are considered, along with Employment Insurance claims and beneficiaries.

    Most analyses in this chapter focus on women (and men) in the core working ages of 25 to 54 years, as younger people's (15-24 years) labour market experiences are shaped by school attendance, and older people's (55 years and older) are shaped by retirement. However, gender differences in labour market indicators among youth and mature adults are considered separately at the end.

    Release date: 2017-03-08

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-02-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114680
    Description:

    The chapter entitled "Women in Canada: The Girl Child" explores the diverse circumstances and experiences of girls aged 17 and under. The chapter describes the demographic characteristics of girls in Canada and presents several topics related to their well-being including: living arrangements, socioeconomic conditions, physical health and development, mortality, emotional and social health and development, child care, school readiness, education, and personal security. Where possible, comparisons are made between girls in different age groups, between girls and boys, and within several subpopulations.

    Release date: 2017-02-22

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-08-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114651
    Description:

    This study reports on the trends in the labour force participation rate (LFPR) of prime-aged women (25 to 54) in both Canada and the United States. The paper examines the population groups that have been behind the rising divergence in the LFPR between the two countries over the past two decades.

    Release date: 2016-08-17

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114643
    Description:

    This article provides information on women aged 25 to 64 in natural and applied science occupations in Canada (i.e. scientific occupations), using data from the 1991 and 2001 censuses and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). The employment conditions of men and women in these occupations are also examined, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    Release date: 2016-06-24

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-03-30

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114464
    Description:

    Using data from the 2014 Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS), this study examines the gap in the financial knowledge of men and women and how the difference varies across socioeconomic characteristics such as age and education. It also provides additional insight into the financial knowledge of Canadian men and women who are married or in a common-law union.

    Release date: 2016-03-23

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-630-X2015009
    Description:

    In this edition of Canadian Megatrends, we look at increased participation of women in the paid workforce since the 1950s.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201500114207
    Description:

    The information presented in this article refers to two distinct time periods. First, data pertaining to the characteristics of facilities, the number of annual admissions, and the types of services offered were collected in 2014 and are based upon a 12-month period that preceded the survey. Second, information on the women being served in shelters was collected on a specific "snapshot date" (April 16, 2014).

    Release date: 2015-07-06

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114202
    Description:

    This paper examines the employment patterns of families with children (under the age of 16) over the period from 1976 to 2014, with a particular focus on couple families with children. This article also highlights regional differences in the working patterns of parents, and provides additional information on the employment patterns of lone parents.

    Release date: 2015-06-24

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111915
    Description:

    Between 1991 and 2011, the proportion of employed people aged 25 to 34 with a university degree rose from 19% to 40% among women, and from 17% to 27% among men. Given the increase in the proportion of university graduates, did the occupational profile of young workers change over the period? This article examines long-term changes in the occupation profiles of young men and women, for both those who did and did not have a university degree. Changes in the share of women employed in these occupations are also examined.

    Release date: 2014-04-02

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111874
    Description:

    Women represent the majority of young university graduates, but are still underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and computer sciences (STEM) fields. This article provides more information on women with STEM university degrees, and examines whether mathematical abilities in high school are related to gender differences in STEM university programs.

    Release date: 2013-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2013349
    Description:

    Canadian immigrants come from a range of source countries which vary considerably in gender roles. Examining gender roles is therefore valuable in determining whether cultural norms continue to influence labour activities after immigrants have been exposed to the new environment of their host country. This study focuses on the "portability" of gender roles for immigrant women; that is, it examines whether source-country gender roles continue to influence immigrant families' labour and housework activities after arrival in Canada.

    Release date: 2013-03-28

Reference (2)

Reference (2) (2 results)

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: