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All (16)

All (16) (16 of 16 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114785
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada explores the criminal victimization of women and girls as well as their involvement in the criminal justice system as offenders. It covers the types of criminal victimization experienced by females over time; where possible, highlighting important differences in violent crime by Aboriginal identity, immigrant status, visible minority status and age. The use of formal and informal support services is explored, including changes over time in the use of police services. This chapter also reports trends in the number and types of crimes committed by females, along with their involvement in the criminal courts and correctional systems.

    Release date: 2017-06-06

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114680
    Description:

    The chapter entitled "Women in Canada: The Girl Child" explores the diverse circumstances and experiences of girls aged 17 and under. The chapter describes the demographic characteristics of girls in Canada and presents several topics related to their well-being including: living arrangements, socioeconomic conditions, physical health and development, mortality, emotional and social health and development, child care, school readiness, education, and personal security. Where possible, comparisons are made between girls in different age groups, between girls and boys, and within several subpopulations.

    Release date: 2017-02-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114315
    Description:

    In this chapter of Women in Canada, the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of visible minority women and girls are explored. Topics include the growth of the visible minority population in Canada and its relationship to immigration, living arrangements, education, labour force participation and employment, social participation, and health. Where it is relevant and feasible, analyses compare both the total visible minority population and specific visible minority groups with the population not belonging to a visible minority group.

    Note: the term “visible minority” refers to one of four designated groups under the Employment Equity Act. Within this context, visible minorities are defined as “persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.”

    Release date: 2016-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201500114207
    Description:

    The information presented in this article refers to two distinct time periods. First, data pertaining to the characteristics of facilities, the number of annual admissions, and the types of services offered were collected in 2014 and are based upon a 12-month period that preceded the survey. Second, information on the women being served in shelters was collected on a specific "snapshot date" (April 16, 2014).

    Release date: 2015-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111874
    Description:

    Women represent the majority of young university graduates, but are still underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and computer sciences (STEM) fields. This article provides more information on women with STEM university degrees, and examines whether mathematical abilities in high school are related to gender differences in STEM university programs.

    Release date: 2013-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200111670
    Description:

    This article examines employer support of volunteering in Canada. It focuses on volunteers who are employed, examining the different types of employer support they receive. It also looks at the number of hours volunteered by supported employees, as well as the type of activities they engage in and work-related skills they acquire through volunteering. Possible effects of employer support are explored, including how it relates to employees' perceptions that volunteering increases their chances of job success.

    Release date: 2012-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111416
    Description:

    The chapter entitled Women and the criminal justice system explores the prevalence and nature of female victimization, female criminality, as well as the processing of female offenders through the criminal justice system in Canada. Specifically, the types of offences perpetrated against females and by females are examined, as are trends over time in police-reported incidents, completed court cases and admissions to provincial and federal correctional services. Trends involving female youth and female adult offenders are explored separately.

    Release date: 2011-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211335
    Description:

    Women have made substantial gains in education over the last few decades and are now more likely to have a university degree than men. At the same time, the conjugal situation of female university graduates has changed considerably. Using data from the 1981 to 2006 Censuses, this article examines how the propensity to form unions (marriage or common-law) has changed for women with university degrees compared to those without a university education. It also compares the incidence of female university graduates forming unions with similarly educated males over time.

    Release date: 2010-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900211024
    Description:

    This first article in the "Living with disability" series briefly explores the evolution of theories about disability and outline contemporary thinking about how to define disability. It then compares data from the 2001 and the 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Surveys (PALS) to see how the incidence of disability is growing in Canada, and identify the proportion of that growth that is due to changing public perceptions of disability.

    Release date: 2009-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110690
    Description:

    This article is about Canadians' participation in active leisure. Active leisure helps keep us fit and healthy. It may also save health care costs. Using data from the 1992 and 2005 General Social Surveys on time use, this article looks at the factors influencing active leisure activities of Canadians aged 20 and over. It will also examine which groups are more likely to participate in active leisure in 2005.

    Release date: 2009-02-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110553
    Description:

    This article examines trends in the amount of time Canadians sleep. Sleep is important for our health and for our ability to interact and be sociable with others. Comparing groups of people in different job and family situations can help to identify influences, apart from our bodies' physiology, that affect our sleep. The article also investigates the differences in sleep times consistently reported between men and women.

    Release date: 2008-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010065882
    Description:

    This article uses a measure of low income intensity which incorporates the more commonly known low income rate and the average depth of low income to compare urban and rural families in Canada between 1993 and 1997.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010078393
    Description:

    Research studies have found a connection between spousal violence and separation, particularly for women. Using data from the 1999 General Social Survey, the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey, the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the Homicide Survey, this Juristat investigates the prevalence, nature and severity of violence that occurs following the breakdown of a marital union.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006462
    Description:

    The 1999 General Social Survey was the first attempt by Statistics Canada to measure spousal violence in a comprehensive way on a traditional victimization survey. Both women and men were asked a module of 10 questions concerning violence by their current or previous spouses and common-law partners. The nature of the violence under study ranged in severity from threats to sexual assault, and it concerned acts that happened in the 12-month and 5-year periods preceding the survey interview.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000118384
    Description:

    This Juristat outlines the characteristics of criminal harassment incidents as well as the characteristics of the accused and victim for 1999, and identifies trends over the past five years. (Trend data are only available for the five-year period from 1995 to 1999.) This Juristat updates a similar Juristat written in 1996 using information collected from police forces and adult criminal courts to review the charges laid and sentences imposed for cases involving criminal harassment.

    There are many different types of stalkers. However, most victims of criminal harassment know their accused quite well and, in many instances, the stalker and victim were involved in a previous relationship.

    Release date: 2000-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031637
    Description:

    In the midst of extensive restructuring and downsizing, women have continued to enter male-dominated occupations, albeit more slowly than before. This study explores women's occupational crossovers from 1986 to 1991 and compares them with earlier developments between 1971 and 1986.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006462
    Description:

    The 1999 General Social Survey was the first attempt by Statistics Canada to measure spousal violence in a comprehensive way on a traditional victimization survey. Both women and men were asked a module of 10 questions concerning violence by their current or previous spouses and common-law partners. The nature of the violence under study ranged in severity from threats to sexual assault, and it concerned acts that happened in the 12-month and 5-year periods preceding the survey interview.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

Analysis (15)

Analysis (15) (15 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114785
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada explores the criminal victimization of women and girls as well as their involvement in the criminal justice system as offenders. It covers the types of criminal victimization experienced by females over time; where possible, highlighting important differences in violent crime by Aboriginal identity, immigrant status, visible minority status and age. The use of formal and informal support services is explored, including changes over time in the use of police services. This chapter also reports trends in the number and types of crimes committed by females, along with their involvement in the criminal courts and correctional systems.

    Release date: 2017-06-06

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114680
    Description:

    The chapter entitled "Women in Canada: The Girl Child" explores the diverse circumstances and experiences of girls aged 17 and under. The chapter describes the demographic characteristics of girls in Canada and presents several topics related to their well-being including: living arrangements, socioeconomic conditions, physical health and development, mortality, emotional and social health and development, child care, school readiness, education, and personal security. Where possible, comparisons are made between girls in different age groups, between girls and boys, and within several subpopulations.

    Release date: 2017-02-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114315
    Description:

    In this chapter of Women in Canada, the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of visible minority women and girls are explored. Topics include the growth of the visible minority population in Canada and its relationship to immigration, living arrangements, education, labour force participation and employment, social participation, and health. Where it is relevant and feasible, analyses compare both the total visible minority population and specific visible minority groups with the population not belonging to a visible minority group.

    Note: the term “visible minority” refers to one of four designated groups under the Employment Equity Act. Within this context, visible minorities are defined as “persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.”

    Release date: 2016-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201500114207
    Description:

    The information presented in this article refers to two distinct time periods. First, data pertaining to the characteristics of facilities, the number of annual admissions, and the types of services offered were collected in 2014 and are based upon a 12-month period that preceded the survey. Second, information on the women being served in shelters was collected on a specific "snapshot date" (April 16, 2014).

    Release date: 2015-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111874
    Description:

    Women represent the majority of young university graduates, but are still underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and computer sciences (STEM) fields. This article provides more information on women with STEM university degrees, and examines whether mathematical abilities in high school are related to gender differences in STEM university programs.

    Release date: 2013-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200111670
    Description:

    This article examines employer support of volunteering in Canada. It focuses on volunteers who are employed, examining the different types of employer support they receive. It also looks at the number of hours volunteered by supported employees, as well as the type of activities they engage in and work-related skills they acquire through volunteering. Possible effects of employer support are explored, including how it relates to employees' perceptions that volunteering increases their chances of job success.

    Release date: 2012-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111416
    Description:

    The chapter entitled Women and the criminal justice system explores the prevalence and nature of female victimization, female criminality, as well as the processing of female offenders through the criminal justice system in Canada. Specifically, the types of offences perpetrated against females and by females are examined, as are trends over time in police-reported incidents, completed court cases and admissions to provincial and federal correctional services. Trends involving female youth and female adult offenders are explored separately.

    Release date: 2011-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211335
    Description:

    Women have made substantial gains in education over the last few decades and are now more likely to have a university degree than men. At the same time, the conjugal situation of female university graduates has changed considerably. Using data from the 1981 to 2006 Censuses, this article examines how the propensity to form unions (marriage or common-law) has changed for women with university degrees compared to those without a university education. It also compares the incidence of female university graduates forming unions with similarly educated males over time.

    Release date: 2010-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900211024
    Description:

    This first article in the "Living with disability" series briefly explores the evolution of theories about disability and outline contemporary thinking about how to define disability. It then compares data from the 2001 and the 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Surveys (PALS) to see how the incidence of disability is growing in Canada, and identify the proportion of that growth that is due to changing public perceptions of disability.

    Release date: 2009-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110690
    Description:

    This article is about Canadians' participation in active leisure. Active leisure helps keep us fit and healthy. It may also save health care costs. Using data from the 1992 and 2005 General Social Surveys on time use, this article looks at the factors influencing active leisure activities of Canadians aged 20 and over. It will also examine which groups are more likely to participate in active leisure in 2005.

    Release date: 2009-02-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110553
    Description:

    This article examines trends in the amount of time Canadians sleep. Sleep is important for our health and for our ability to interact and be sociable with others. Comparing groups of people in different job and family situations can help to identify influences, apart from our bodies' physiology, that affect our sleep. The article also investigates the differences in sleep times consistently reported between men and women.

    Release date: 2008-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010065882
    Description:

    This article uses a measure of low income intensity which incorporates the more commonly known low income rate and the average depth of low income to compare urban and rural families in Canada between 1993 and 1997.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010078393
    Description:

    Research studies have found a connection between spousal violence and separation, particularly for women. Using data from the 1999 General Social Survey, the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey, the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the Homicide Survey, this Juristat investigates the prevalence, nature and severity of violence that occurs following the breakdown of a marital union.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000118384
    Description:

    This Juristat outlines the characteristics of criminal harassment incidents as well as the characteristics of the accused and victim for 1999, and identifies trends over the past five years. (Trend data are only available for the five-year period from 1995 to 1999.) This Juristat updates a similar Juristat written in 1996 using information collected from police forces and adult criminal courts to review the charges laid and sentences imposed for cases involving criminal harassment.

    There are many different types of stalkers. However, most victims of criminal harassment know their accused quite well and, in many instances, the stalker and victim were involved in a previous relationship.

    Release date: 2000-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031637
    Description:

    In the midst of extensive restructuring and downsizing, women have continued to enter male-dominated occupations, albeit more slowly than before. This study explores women's occupational crossovers from 1986 to 1991 and compares them with earlier developments between 1971 and 1986.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

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