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All (28)

All (28) (25 of 28 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114694
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada examines women's labour market experiences in comparison to those of men and, where relevant, explores how they have evolved over time. Specifically, historical trends in participation, employment, and unemployment rates are documented. Then, using the most recent data available, employment patterns across a variety of personal and work characteristics are considered: province; educational attainment; marital status; parental status and age of youngest child/ren in the household; lone parenthood; work hours; self-employment; sector of employment (i.e., public or private); "precarious" (i.e., part-time and/or temporary) employment; industry; and occupation. Gender wage differentials are also explored within and between educational and occupational groups. Turning to unemployment, patterns by age, province, and reasons for job leaving/losing are considered, along with Employment Insurance claims and beneficiaries.

    Most analyses in this chapter focus on women (and men) in the core working ages of 25 to 54 years, as younger people's (15-24 years) labour market experiences are shaped by school attendance, and older people's (55 years and older) are shaped by retirement. However, gender differences in labour market indicators among youth and mature adults are considered separately at the end.

    Release date: 2017-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114639
    Description:

    This study examines the extent to which young adults aged 20 to 29 live with their parents across various ethnocultural and socioeconomic characteristics. The results are based on data from the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) as well as data from previous censuses.

    Release date: 2016-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114154
    Description:

    Even though most grandparents live in separate households from their adult children and grandchildren, sometimes the grandparent and grandchild generations live together. This paper provides information on the number of grandparents who are in this particular situation, along with their living arrangements and their ethnocultural and sociodemographic characteristics.

    Release date: 2015-04-14

  • Table: 98-310-X201100311622
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look at relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The three articles linked to the population and dwelling counts release are entitled 'Population growth in Canada: From 1851 to 2061,' 'Canada's rural population since 1851' and 'The census: A tool for planning at the local level.'

    Release date: 2012-02-08

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111546
    Description:

    This chapter on families, living arrangements and unpaid work examines the family context and living arrangements of women, including their conjugal lives, and for those in couples, whether they are legal marriages or common-law unions, opposite-sex or same-sex couples, and whether or not there are children present. In addition, female lone-parent families are also analysed, as well as women who live in other arrangements, such as alone or with non-relatives. Other patterns related to births, marriages and divorces are explored, as are family characteristics and living arrangements of immigrant women and visible minority women. Finally, the area of unpaid work is examined, specifically, care of household children, domestic work (including housework and household maintenance) and volunteering.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111527
    Description:

    The chapter provided a statistical overview of the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the female visible minority population in Canada. Drawing mainly data from the 2006 Census, the chapter looked at the growth and the geographical distribution of the population, its family situation and language characteristics as well as its diversity in terms of generational status and country of birth. The chapter also presented results of the analysis on educational attainment, labour market experience and economic well-being such as earnings and components of income. The analyses compared the situations of visible minority women with those of women who did not report visible minority status and those of visible minority men. Where applicable, immigrant status was taken into account in the examination of the experience of visible minority women, i.e., comparison was made between visible minority women who were born in Canada and those who came to live as immigrants. As well, the differences among the groups that made up the visible minority population were highlighted.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111441
    Description:

    This chapter, entitled Senior Women, provides an overview of the situation of senior women in the population, analyzed from an historical perspective when applicable. We will examine their sociodemographic characteristics, including life expectancy, diversity, and family situation. Various factors are also associated with this population's well-being, such as social life, economic situation and health; we will therefore explore social networks and subjective well-being, volunteering, and the most recent trends in the labour force participation and income of senior women. Finally, we will present the most prevalent chronic health conditions in senior women, their lifestyle habits, the formal and informal care to which they have access, and the causes of death.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111475
    Description:

    The Female Population chapter of Women in Canada presents the socio-demographic and ethno-cultural characteristics of women and girls living in this country. Understanding the current trends related to an aging, and an increasingly diverse female population, can help inform policy and planning. Topics examined in this chapter include the distribution of the female population across the provinces and territories and across age, and the share with an Aboriginal identity. In addition, aspects of diversity within the female population, including immigrant status and visible minority status, will be presented as well as residential mobility, language-related characteristics, and religious affiliation and religiosity. Where appropriate, trends over time will be analyzed and comparisons will be drawn with the male population in order to highlight existing similarities and differences.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211520
    Description:

    Research suggests that the division of labour and the role expectations for men and women are continuing to evolve. This may be especially true for Generation Y, those born between 1980 and 1995 and who grew up during a period of changing family dynamics and family formation. Using General Social Survey - Time use data from 1986, 1998 and 2010 this article examines the changes in the participation in, and time spent on paid work and unpaid household work of individuals aged 20 to 29 from three generations' late baby boomers, Generation X and Generation Y. The final section looks at the distribution of time spent on paid and unpaid work within dual-earner couples.

    Release date: 2011-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211345
    Description:

    This article uses the 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey to examine how many people with disabilities receive help with activities of daily living; the type of daily activities with which they get help; and the care receiver's relationship to the person or persons who provide help with specific tasks. Then it explores how these relationships change as the severity of the care receiver's disability increases.

    Release date: 2010-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211335
    Description:

    Women have made substantial gains in education over the last few decades and are now more likely to have a university degree than men. At the same time, the conjugal situation of female university graduates has changed considerably. Using data from the 1981 to 2006 Censuses, this article examines how the propensity to form unions (marriage or common-law) has changed for women with university degrees compared to those without a university education. It also compares the incidence of female university graduates forming unions with similarly educated males over time.

    Release date: 2010-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010513249
    Description:

    Using data from the Labour Force Survey, this article examines the evolution of the employment rate and work hours of wives whose husbands suffered job loss during the last three labour market downturns: 1981 to 1983, 1990 to 1992 and 2008 to 2009.

    Release date: 2010-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900211024
    Description:

    This first article in the "Living with disability" series briefly explores the evolution of theories about disability and outline contemporary thinking about how to define disability. It then compares data from the 2001 and the 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Surveys (PALS) to see how the incidence of disability is growing in Canada, and identify the proportion of that growth that is due to changing public perceptions of disability.

    Release date: 2009-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060029274
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2001 General Social Survey to examine patterns in leaving the parental home. It compares the transition process for five birth cohorts,with the focus on Wave 1 Boomers (born between 1947 and 1956) and their children in Generation X (born between 1967 and 1976). The differences in patterns of leaving the parental home are examined, and then the principal factors associated with a young person's initial launch into adulthood are identified.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610713167
    Description:

    The division of labour between men and women continues to evolve. Today's couples have a much more equal partnership in sharing financial, child care and household responsibilities. This has been brought about in large part by the expanding economic role of women, which has helped erode the idea that men should be primarily responsible for paid work while women look after unpaid household and family duties.

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060089290
    Description:

    As women have entered the labour force in greater numbers, gender differences in the division of labour within families have diminished, with men assuming more housework and child care. Changing work arrangements at home are also leading employers to adapt alternative work arrangements.

    Release date: 2006-08-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050049125
    Description:

    Using the 2003 General Social Survey (GSS), this paper examines the extent of helping behaviours given and received by young adults aged 15 to 24. This age group was chosen because the positive social behaviours of young adults are not often examined. Particular helping behaviours given and received in the month prior to the survey included providing emotional support; teaching, coaching, or giving practical advice; providing transportation or running errands; doing domestic work, home maintenance or outdoor work; helping with child care; or other forms of help.

    Release date: 2006-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038965
    Description:

    Young adults are often viewed as uninterested in political activity. This article outlines the extent of political engagement among young adults in their 20s, as measured by traditional (voting) and alternative (non-voting) political participation. It then examines some of the links between young adults' selected characteristics and their political behaviours such as voting, signing petitions, boycotting certain products, attending public meetings or participating in demonstrations.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008644
    Description:

    Recently, through the General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization, questions related to spousal violence against women and men were repeated. Results of this survey permit the analysis of how spousal violence has changed in nature and extent over the two cycles of the survey from and, for the first time, provide trends on male spousal violence. As will be highlighted in this chapter, the GSS illustrates that overall spousal violence rates have remained stable, but violence in previous relationships has decreased for both women and men and continues to be more common than in current relationships. In addition, the data continue to show that violence is more prevalent in common-law relationships than in marital unions, and although relatively equal proportions of women and men report some type of spousal violence, women continue to suffer more serious and repeated spousal violence than do men and incur more serious consequences as a result of this violence.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040016883
    Description:

    This article looks at rural and urban adult migrants, the distance they move and changes in their economic circumstances before and after moving.

    Release date: 2004-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20040048403
    Description:

    This Juristat presents the results of the Hate Crime Pilot Survey undertaken by the CCJS in collaboration with 12 major police forces across the country. This paper also draws on other available data sources in order to provide contextual information on hate crime and quantify its occurrence.

    Release date: 2004-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020026349
    Description:

    This article examines suicide deaths and hospitalized suicide attempts among Canadians aged 10 years or older.

    Release date: 2002-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000035375
    Description:

    For some time, concerns have been raised about the movement of young people away from rural areas, mainly to find work. This article provides information on the extent to which youths stay, leave or return to rural communities. (Adapted from a recently published analytical report.)

    Release date: 2000-09-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990024657
    Description:

    This study amalgamates many existing methods of delineating the northern boundary to propose a new, more universal concept of Canada's northern regions.

    Release date: 1999-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014027
    Description:

    I examine three questions in this paper : 1. Does existing knowledge about intergenerational transfers, both public and private, provide the basis for effective policy choices? What is missing? What is needed, in particular by Canada's statistical system? 2. With an aging society, rapidly shifting labour markets, and shrinking social transfers in Canada, is a new generational compact emerging? and 3. What are the roles of differing models of inter-generational transfers, indeed of the demo-graphic concept of generation itself, in defining the field of policy options for Canadians in the late 1990s? In addressing these questions, I rely on analyses and a framework developed in McDaniel (1997).

    Release date: 1998-11-05

Data (3)

Data (3) (3 results)

  • Table: 98-310-X201100311622
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look at relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The three articles linked to the population and dwelling counts release are entitled 'Population growth in Canada: From 1851 to 2061,' 'Canada's rural population since 1851' and 'The census: A tool for planning at the local level.'

    Release date: 2012-02-08

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008644
    Description:

    Recently, through the General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization, questions related to spousal violence against women and men were repeated. Results of this survey permit the analysis of how spousal violence has changed in nature and extent over the two cycles of the survey from and, for the first time, provide trends on male spousal violence. As will be highlighted in this chapter, the GSS illustrates that overall spousal violence rates have remained stable, but violence in previous relationships has decreased for both women and men and continues to be more common than in current relationships. In addition, the data continue to show that violence is more prevalent in common-law relationships than in marital unions, and although relatively equal proportions of women and men report some type of spousal violence, women continue to suffer more serious and repeated spousal violence than do men and incur more serious consequences as a result of this violence.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013568
    Description:

    Many governments have adopted policies aimed at reducing public debt. Although the long-run fiscal dividends of such policies largely depend on the size of the debt-to-GDP cut, the short and medium run effects are more dependent on the type and speed of measures taken.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

Analysis (25)

Analysis (25) (25 of 25 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114694
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada examines women's labour market experiences in comparison to those of men and, where relevant, explores how they have evolved over time. Specifically, historical trends in participation, employment, and unemployment rates are documented. Then, using the most recent data available, employment patterns across a variety of personal and work characteristics are considered: province; educational attainment; marital status; parental status and age of youngest child/ren in the household; lone parenthood; work hours; self-employment; sector of employment (i.e., public or private); "precarious" (i.e., part-time and/or temporary) employment; industry; and occupation. Gender wage differentials are also explored within and between educational and occupational groups. Turning to unemployment, patterns by age, province, and reasons for job leaving/losing are considered, along with Employment Insurance claims and beneficiaries.

    Most analyses in this chapter focus on women (and men) in the core working ages of 25 to 54 years, as younger people's (15-24 years) labour market experiences are shaped by school attendance, and older people's (55 years and older) are shaped by retirement. However, gender differences in labour market indicators among youth and mature adults are considered separately at the end.

    Release date: 2017-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114639
    Description:

    This study examines the extent to which young adults aged 20 to 29 live with their parents across various ethnocultural and socioeconomic characteristics. The results are based on data from the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) as well as data from previous censuses.

    Release date: 2016-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114154
    Description:

    Even though most grandparents live in separate households from their adult children and grandchildren, sometimes the grandparent and grandchild generations live together. This paper provides information on the number of grandparents who are in this particular situation, along with their living arrangements and their ethnocultural and sociodemographic characteristics.

    Release date: 2015-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111546
    Description:

    This chapter on families, living arrangements and unpaid work examines the family context and living arrangements of women, including their conjugal lives, and for those in couples, whether they are legal marriages or common-law unions, opposite-sex or same-sex couples, and whether or not there are children present. In addition, female lone-parent families are also analysed, as well as women who live in other arrangements, such as alone or with non-relatives. Other patterns related to births, marriages and divorces are explored, as are family characteristics and living arrangements of immigrant women and visible minority women. Finally, the area of unpaid work is examined, specifically, care of household children, domestic work (including housework and household maintenance) and volunteering.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111527
    Description:

    The chapter provided a statistical overview of the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the female visible minority population in Canada. Drawing mainly data from the 2006 Census, the chapter looked at the growth and the geographical distribution of the population, its family situation and language characteristics as well as its diversity in terms of generational status and country of birth. The chapter also presented results of the analysis on educational attainment, labour market experience and economic well-being such as earnings and components of income. The analyses compared the situations of visible minority women with those of women who did not report visible minority status and those of visible minority men. Where applicable, immigrant status was taken into account in the examination of the experience of visible minority women, i.e., comparison was made between visible minority women who were born in Canada and those who came to live as immigrants. As well, the differences among the groups that made up the visible minority population were highlighted.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111441
    Description:

    This chapter, entitled Senior Women, provides an overview of the situation of senior women in the population, analyzed from an historical perspective when applicable. We will examine their sociodemographic characteristics, including life expectancy, diversity, and family situation. Various factors are also associated with this population's well-being, such as social life, economic situation and health; we will therefore explore social networks and subjective well-being, volunteering, and the most recent trends in the labour force participation and income of senior women. Finally, we will present the most prevalent chronic health conditions in senior women, their lifestyle habits, the formal and informal care to which they have access, and the causes of death.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111475
    Description:

    The Female Population chapter of Women in Canada presents the socio-demographic and ethno-cultural characteristics of women and girls living in this country. Understanding the current trends related to an aging, and an increasingly diverse female population, can help inform policy and planning. Topics examined in this chapter include the distribution of the female population across the provinces and territories and across age, and the share with an Aboriginal identity. In addition, aspects of diversity within the female population, including immigrant status and visible minority status, will be presented as well as residential mobility, language-related characteristics, and religious affiliation and religiosity. Where appropriate, trends over time will be analyzed and comparisons will be drawn with the male population in order to highlight existing similarities and differences.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211520
    Description:

    Research suggests that the division of labour and the role expectations for men and women are continuing to evolve. This may be especially true for Generation Y, those born between 1980 and 1995 and who grew up during a period of changing family dynamics and family formation. Using General Social Survey - Time use data from 1986, 1998 and 2010 this article examines the changes in the participation in, and time spent on paid work and unpaid household work of individuals aged 20 to 29 from three generations' late baby boomers, Generation X and Generation Y. The final section looks at the distribution of time spent on paid and unpaid work within dual-earner couples.

    Release date: 2011-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211345
    Description:

    This article uses the 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey to examine how many people with disabilities receive help with activities of daily living; the type of daily activities with which they get help; and the care receiver's relationship to the person or persons who provide help with specific tasks. Then it explores how these relationships change as the severity of the care receiver's disability increases.

    Release date: 2010-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211335
    Description:

    Women have made substantial gains in education over the last few decades and are now more likely to have a university degree than men. At the same time, the conjugal situation of female university graduates has changed considerably. Using data from the 1981 to 2006 Censuses, this article examines how the propensity to form unions (marriage or common-law) has changed for women with university degrees compared to those without a university education. It also compares the incidence of female university graduates forming unions with similarly educated males over time.

    Release date: 2010-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010513249
    Description:

    Using data from the Labour Force Survey, this article examines the evolution of the employment rate and work hours of wives whose husbands suffered job loss during the last three labour market downturns: 1981 to 1983, 1990 to 1992 and 2008 to 2009.

    Release date: 2010-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900211024
    Description:

    This first article in the "Living with disability" series briefly explores the evolution of theories about disability and outline contemporary thinking about how to define disability. It then compares data from the 2001 and the 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Surveys (PALS) to see how the incidence of disability is growing in Canada, and identify the proportion of that growth that is due to changing public perceptions of disability.

    Release date: 2009-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060029274
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2001 General Social Survey to examine patterns in leaving the parental home. It compares the transition process for five birth cohorts,with the focus on Wave 1 Boomers (born between 1947 and 1956) and their children in Generation X (born between 1967 and 1976). The differences in patterns of leaving the parental home are examined, and then the principal factors associated with a young person's initial launch into adulthood are identified.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610713167
    Description:

    The division of labour between men and women continues to evolve. Today's couples have a much more equal partnership in sharing financial, child care and household responsibilities. This has been brought about in large part by the expanding economic role of women, which has helped erode the idea that men should be primarily responsible for paid work while women look after unpaid household and family duties.

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060089290
    Description:

    As women have entered the labour force in greater numbers, gender differences in the division of labour within families have diminished, with men assuming more housework and child care. Changing work arrangements at home are also leading employers to adapt alternative work arrangements.

    Release date: 2006-08-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050049125
    Description:

    Using the 2003 General Social Survey (GSS), this paper examines the extent of helping behaviours given and received by young adults aged 15 to 24. This age group was chosen because the positive social behaviours of young adults are not often examined. Particular helping behaviours given and received in the month prior to the survey included providing emotional support; teaching, coaching, or giving practical advice; providing transportation or running errands; doing domestic work, home maintenance or outdoor work; helping with child care; or other forms of help.

    Release date: 2006-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038965
    Description:

    Young adults are often viewed as uninterested in political activity. This article outlines the extent of political engagement among young adults in their 20s, as measured by traditional (voting) and alternative (non-voting) political participation. It then examines some of the links between young adults' selected characteristics and their political behaviours such as voting, signing petitions, boycotting certain products, attending public meetings or participating in demonstrations.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040016883
    Description:

    This article looks at rural and urban adult migrants, the distance they move and changes in their economic circumstances before and after moving.

    Release date: 2004-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20040048403
    Description:

    This Juristat presents the results of the Hate Crime Pilot Survey undertaken by the CCJS in collaboration with 12 major police forces across the country. This paper also draws on other available data sources in order to provide contextual information on hate crime and quantify its occurrence.

    Release date: 2004-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020026349
    Description:

    This article examines suicide deaths and hospitalized suicide attempts among Canadians aged 10 years or older.

    Release date: 2002-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000035375
    Description:

    For some time, concerns have been raised about the movement of young people away from rural areas, mainly to find work. This article provides information on the extent to which youths stay, leave or return to rural communities. (Adapted from a recently published analytical report.)

    Release date: 2000-09-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990024657
    Description:

    This study amalgamates many existing methods of delineating the northern boundary to propose a new, more universal concept of Canada's northern regions.

    Release date: 1999-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014027
    Description:

    I examine three questions in this paper : 1. Does existing knowledge about intergenerational transfers, both public and private, provide the basis for effective policy choices? What is missing? What is needed, in particular by Canada's statistical system? 2. With an aging society, rapidly shifting labour markets, and shrinking social transfers in Canada, is a new generational compact emerging? and 3. What are the roles of differing models of inter-generational transfers, indeed of the demo-graphic concept of generation itself, in defining the field of policy options for Canadians in the late 1990s? In addressing these questions, I rely on analyses and a framework developed in McDaniel (1997).

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19970004871
    Description:

    During the century now coming to a close, the structure of Canada's population has changed, chiefly as a result of the slow decline in fertility, which has narrowed the base of the age pyramid and broadened its peak. This steady evolution was interrupted for about 20 years by a still-unexplained phenomenon - the baby boom. Between 1946 and 1965, fertility and natality hit levels considered irretrievably lost, resulting in the famous explosion of births.

    Release date: 1998-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19970033208
    Description:

    On February 20 and 21, 1997, Statistics Canada hosted the conference, "Intergenerational Equity in Canada." This report presents a brief overview of the concepts and issues associatedwith "equity" between and within generations, summarizing selected conference presentations.

    Release date: 1997-09-10

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