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All (18)

All (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1999008
    Description:

    This article investigates the extent to which factors not previously explored in the Canadian context account for wage differences between men and women. It uses data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 1999-12-20

  • Public use microdata: 12M0012X
    Description:

    Cycle 12 collected data from persons 15 years and older. The core content of time use repeats that of cycle 7 (1992) and cycle 2 (1986), and provides data on the daily activities of Canadians. Question modules were also included on unpaid work activities, cultural activities and participation in sports. The target population of the General Social Survey consisted of all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 1999-11-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-570-X
    Description:

    The purpose of this book is to describe the nature, extent and consequences of informal care in Canada to seniors with high care needs. Data from the 1996 General Social Survey provide the basis for discussions of how seniors receiving care compare to other seniors; of the amount and types of care provided to seniors; of the impacts on caregivers of their caring work. Findings are synthesized into a set of issues concerning Canada's informal caregiving resources and the likely costs and benefits of increased demands on those resources.

    Release date: 1999-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990024658
    Description:

    This article addresses some questions about the religious observance of children under 12 years.

    Release date: 1999-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990024657
    Description:

    This study amalgamates many existing methods of delineating the northern boundary to propose a new, more universal concept of Canada's northern regions.

    Release date: 1999-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990034681
    Description:

    As governments have cut back on social and other services, an aging population's need for a strong support structure has grown. Seniors, in fact, have created both a growing market for such services and a potential source of volunteer labour to meet these needs; How involved are seniors in volunteering? What services are they providing? This study examines the volunteer activity of seniors aged 55 and over in 1997.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1999008
    Description:

    A majority of registered indians in Canada reside in one of the approximately 900 small First Nations communities which form a 5,000 kilometre archipelago across the Canadian landscape. The purpose of this paper is to explore four questions regarding the socio-economic well-being of First Nations communities: 1) What is the current geographical pattern of socio-economic well-being of First Nations communities? 2) What do the patterns suggest about possible strategies for socio-economic development open to First Nations?

    Release date: 1999-06-16

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005307
    Description:

    The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics has been tracking trends in crimes reported to the police since 1962 through the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005306
    Description:

    In Canada, there are a variety of data sources that can be used to examine the nature and extent of family violence. These fall into two general categories: victimization survey data based on victims' accounts of their experiences of family violence reported to survey interviewers, and those based on incidents reported to the police, hospitals, coroners, chlid welfare or other social agencies.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005313
    Description:

    From 1978 to 1997 there were 12,871 victims of homicide in Canada. Family members were responsible for nearly one-third (31%) of these, another 39% were committed by acquaintances, and 12% by strangers. Throughout the period, women and girls were most likely to be killed by a family member (50%), whereas, men and boys were most likely to be killed by acquaintances (46%).

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1998007
    Description:

    Rural populations are defined, in part, by their distance to a metropolitan centre. The use of computers and, more recently, access to the Internet have been proposed as a way for rural residents to reduce the cost of distance. The purposes of this bulletin are to review the use of computers by members of rural households and, specifically, to review their use of the Internet.

    Release date: 1999-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1998006
    Description:

    Many rural communities are searching for ways to stimulate local economic growth. Some factors are unique to a particular time and place. But are there other factors that will foster growth over time? The purpose of this bulletin is to review some of the factors associated with local economic growth.

    Release date: 1999-04-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990058300
    Description:

    This Juristat profiles three populations of inmates: women, Aboriginal people and individuals serving life sentences. These data are based on a census of adult inmates on register in all adult correctional facilities as of midnight October 5th, 1996. Data were obtained through administrative records.

    While the general population in Canada was made up almost equally of men and women, women comprised only 5% of prisoners in correctional facilities on October 5, 1996. Female inmates tended to be in their early 30s, single, with grade 9 education or less, and unemployed at the time of admission. They were considered at lower risk to re-offend than men.

    Aboriginal people were over-represented in the prison system. Although they comprised only 2% of the general adult population, they accounted for 17% of the prison population. They were younger on average than non-Aboriginal inmates, had less education and were more likely to have been unemployed. They were also considered at higher risk to re-offend, and they had a higher set of needs than non-Aboriginal inmates (including, substance abuse, employment, personal needs and family/marital needs).

    The data also showed that as of midnight October 5th, 1996, inmates serving a life sentence comprised nearly one-fifth (18%) of the nearly 13,900 inmates in federal prisons. A person can be given a life sentence if they have been convicted of offences such as first degree or second-degree murder. Parole eligibility varies from minimum ten years served to minimum 25 years served.

    Individuals serving life sentences tended to be older and less educated than others in the prison population. The median age for lifers on snapshot day was 39, compared with 33 for other inmates. More than one-half (56%) of lifers had a grade 9 education or less, compared with 44% of other inmates.

    In addition, a majority (84%) of inmates serving life sentences were considered at high risk to re-offend, a much higher proportion than the 53% of other inmates. Not surprisingly, lifers also had a higher set of needs, that is, problem areas requiring intervention, such as personal and emotional issues, marital and family problems, attitude and problems functioning in the community.

    For more information or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, or to order a copy of the Juristat, contact Information and Client Services (613-951-9023 or 1-800-387-2231), Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.

    Release date: 1999-04-22

  • Technical products: 13F0027X
    Description:

    Recently there has been extensive and recurring media coverage of Statistics Canada's low income cut-offs and their relationship to the measurement of poverty. At the heart of the debate is the use of the low income cut-offs as poverty lines even though Statistics Canada has clearly stated, since their publication began over 25 years ago, that they are not. The high profile recently given this issue has presented Statistics Canada with a welcome opportunity to restate its position on these issues, views which seem to have become lost in the debate.

    Release date: 1999-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1998004
    Description:

    A defining feature of rural populations is that they are distant from major metropolitan centres. Thus, households in rural areas have different needs than those in urban areas and, therefore, different spending patterns. In 1996, the total expenditure of an average Canadian household was $49,054. Rural households spent an average of $42,620 while urban households had an average spending of $50,283. This article gives an overview of the differences and similarities in the spending patterns of rural and urban households.

    Release date: 1999-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1998005
    Description:

    When Canadians need to see a doctor, the cost of physician services is not a barrier. However, travel distance may restrict some people's access to health services. This article examines the proximity of the population to physicians. From a representative point within each of Canada's 45,995 Enumeration Areas (EAs), we calculated the aerial distance to the nearest physician.

    Release date: 1999-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1998002
    Description:

    Job creation is one major focus of rural development initiatives. The purpose of this bulletin is to provide an overview of employment and unemployment patterns in the non-metro workforce. In this bulletin, we combined the rural and small town population (as defined in ANALYSIS BULLETIN No. 1) with the Census Agglomeration (CA) population to constitute the non-metro population (see "Definitions" box). Our results for the overall non-metro workforce also apply to the rural and small town component of the non-metro workforce (refer to Employment Patterns in the Non-metro Workforce {Ottawa: Statistics Canada, Agriculture and Rural Working Paper No. 35, Cat. No. 21-601-MPE98035}).

    Release date: 1999-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1998003
    Description:

    One component of a development strategy for rural communities is often to promote the establishment and growth of business enterprises. The purpose of this bulletin is to provide an overview of businesses with one or more employees located in smaller communities (incorporated towns and municipalities with less than 20,000 population).

    Release date: 1999-02-22

Data (4)

Data (4) (4 of 4 results)

  • Public use microdata: 12M0012X
    Description:

    Cycle 12 collected data from persons 15 years and older. The core content of time use repeats that of cycle 7 (1992) and cycle 2 (1986), and provides data on the daily activities of Canadians. Question modules were also included on unpaid work activities, cultural activities and participation in sports. The target population of the General Social Survey consisted of all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 1999-11-09

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005307
    Description:

    The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics has been tracking trends in crimes reported to the police since 1962 through the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005306
    Description:

    In Canada, there are a variety of data sources that can be used to examine the nature and extent of family violence. These fall into two general categories: victimization survey data based on victims' accounts of their experiences of family violence reported to survey interviewers, and those based on incidents reported to the police, hospitals, coroners, chlid welfare or other social agencies.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005313
    Description:

    From 1978 to 1997 there were 12,871 victims of homicide in Canada. Family members were responsible for nearly one-third (31%) of these, another 39% were committed by acquaintances, and 12% by strangers. Throughout the period, women and girls were most likely to be killed by a family member (50%), whereas, men and boys were most likely to be killed by acquaintances (46%).

    Release date: 1999-06-11

Analysis (12)

Analysis (12) (12 of 12 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-570-X
    Description:

    The purpose of this book is to describe the nature, extent and consequences of informal care in Canada to seniors with high care needs. Data from the 1996 General Social Survey provide the basis for discussions of how seniors receiving care compare to other seniors; of the amount and types of care provided to seniors; of the impacts on caregivers of their caring work. Findings are synthesized into a set of issues concerning Canada's informal caregiving resources and the likely costs and benefits of increased demands on those resources.

    Release date: 1999-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990024658
    Description:

    This article addresses some questions about the religious observance of children under 12 years.

    Release date: 1999-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990024657
    Description:

    This study amalgamates many existing methods of delineating the northern boundary to propose a new, more universal concept of Canada's northern regions.

    Release date: 1999-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990034681
    Description:

    As governments have cut back on social and other services, an aging population's need for a strong support structure has grown. Seniors, in fact, have created both a growing market for such services and a potential source of volunteer labour to meet these needs; How involved are seniors in volunteering? What services are they providing? This study examines the volunteer activity of seniors aged 55 and over in 1997.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1999008
    Description:

    A majority of registered indians in Canada reside in one of the approximately 900 small First Nations communities which form a 5,000 kilometre archipelago across the Canadian landscape. The purpose of this paper is to explore four questions regarding the socio-economic well-being of First Nations communities: 1) What is the current geographical pattern of socio-economic well-being of First Nations communities? 2) What do the patterns suggest about possible strategies for socio-economic development open to First Nations?

    Release date: 1999-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1998007
    Description:

    Rural populations are defined, in part, by their distance to a metropolitan centre. The use of computers and, more recently, access to the Internet have been proposed as a way for rural residents to reduce the cost of distance. The purposes of this bulletin are to review the use of computers by members of rural households and, specifically, to review their use of the Internet.

    Release date: 1999-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1998006
    Description:

    Many rural communities are searching for ways to stimulate local economic growth. Some factors are unique to a particular time and place. But are there other factors that will foster growth over time? The purpose of this bulletin is to review some of the factors associated with local economic growth.

    Release date: 1999-04-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990058300
    Description:

    This Juristat profiles three populations of inmates: women, Aboriginal people and individuals serving life sentences. These data are based on a census of adult inmates on register in all adult correctional facilities as of midnight October 5th, 1996. Data were obtained through administrative records.

    While the general population in Canada was made up almost equally of men and women, women comprised only 5% of prisoners in correctional facilities on October 5, 1996. Female inmates tended to be in their early 30s, single, with grade 9 education or less, and unemployed at the time of admission. They were considered at lower risk to re-offend than men.

    Aboriginal people were over-represented in the prison system. Although they comprised only 2% of the general adult population, they accounted for 17% of the prison population. They were younger on average than non-Aboriginal inmates, had less education and were more likely to have been unemployed. They were also considered at higher risk to re-offend, and they had a higher set of needs than non-Aboriginal inmates (including, substance abuse, employment, personal needs and family/marital needs).

    The data also showed that as of midnight October 5th, 1996, inmates serving a life sentence comprised nearly one-fifth (18%) of the nearly 13,900 inmates in federal prisons. A person can be given a life sentence if they have been convicted of offences such as first degree or second-degree murder. Parole eligibility varies from minimum ten years served to minimum 25 years served.

    Individuals serving life sentences tended to be older and less educated than others in the prison population. The median age for lifers on snapshot day was 39, compared with 33 for other inmates. More than one-half (56%) of lifers had a grade 9 education or less, compared with 44% of other inmates.

    In addition, a majority (84%) of inmates serving life sentences were considered at high risk to re-offend, a much higher proportion than the 53% of other inmates. Not surprisingly, lifers also had a higher set of needs, that is, problem areas requiring intervention, such as personal and emotional issues, marital and family problems, attitude and problems functioning in the community.

    For more information or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, or to order a copy of the Juristat, contact Information and Client Services (613-951-9023 or 1-800-387-2231), Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.

    Release date: 1999-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1998004
    Description:

    A defining feature of rural populations is that they are distant from major metropolitan centres. Thus, households in rural areas have different needs than those in urban areas and, therefore, different spending patterns. In 1996, the total expenditure of an average Canadian household was $49,054. Rural households spent an average of $42,620 while urban households had an average spending of $50,283. This article gives an overview of the differences and similarities in the spending patterns of rural and urban households.

    Release date: 1999-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1998005
    Description:

    When Canadians need to see a doctor, the cost of physician services is not a barrier. However, travel distance may restrict some people's access to health services. This article examines the proximity of the population to physicians. From a representative point within each of Canada's 45,995 Enumeration Areas (EAs), we calculated the aerial distance to the nearest physician.

    Release date: 1999-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1998002
    Description:

    Job creation is one major focus of rural development initiatives. The purpose of this bulletin is to provide an overview of employment and unemployment patterns in the non-metro workforce. In this bulletin, we combined the rural and small town population (as defined in ANALYSIS BULLETIN No. 1) with the Census Agglomeration (CA) population to constitute the non-metro population (see "Definitions" box). Our results for the overall non-metro workforce also apply to the rural and small town component of the non-metro workforce (refer to Employment Patterns in the Non-metro Workforce {Ottawa: Statistics Canada, Agriculture and Rural Working Paper No. 35, Cat. No. 21-601-MPE98035}).

    Release date: 1999-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1998003
    Description:

    One component of a development strategy for rural communities is often to promote the establishment and growth of business enterprises. The purpose of this bulletin is to provide an overview of businesses with one or more employees located in smaller communities (incorporated towns and municipalities with less than 20,000 population).

    Release date: 1999-02-22

Reference (2)

Reference (2) (2 results)

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1999008
    Description:

    This article investigates the extent to which factors not previously explored in the Canadian context account for wage differences between men and women. It uses data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 1999-12-20

  • Technical products: 13F0027X
    Description:

    Recently there has been extensive and recurring media coverage of Statistics Canada's low income cut-offs and their relationship to the measurement of poverty. At the heart of the debate is the use of the low income cut-offs as poverty lines even though Statistics Canada has clearly stated, since their publication began over 25 years ago, that they are not. The high profile recently given this issue has presented Statistics Canada with a welcome opportunity to restate its position on these issues, views which seem to have become lost in the debate.

    Release date: 1999-04-01

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