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All (34)

All (34) (25 of 34 results)

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2002061
    Description:

    This paper compares six definitions of the word 'rural' from databases at Statistics Canada. Each definition emphasizes different criteria (population size, density, context) and has different associated thresholds. The size of the territorial units (building blocks) from which each definition is constructed also varies.

    Release date: 2002-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002002
    Description:

    In 1996, 17% of Canada's total population were immigrants, and 88% of them were living in urban regions. The three provinces with the largest urban centres attracted most immigrants: 55% went to Ontario, 18% to British Columbia and 13% to Quebec, a pattern that has remained constant for immigrants who have arrived since 1961. The remaining 12% (or 580,000 people) were living in predominantly rural regions. They can be characterized by the period in which they arrived in Canada.

    Recent and new immigrants were better educated than pre-1981 immigrants, particularly in terms of university education. But pre-1981 immigrants had the highest employment rate and were more likely to have professional service occupations than the Canadian-born. Visible minority immigrants fared worse, in socio-economic terms, than non-visible minority immigrants; these differences were more pronounced in predominantly rural regions. The profiles of immigrants in predominantly rural regions were similar to those in predominantly urban regions. However, the few immigrants who resided in rural northern regions had a very different and more favourable profile.

    Release date: 2002-12-12

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2002060
    Description:

    This research project provides an overview of diversification and specialization in rural regions and communities for the census years 1981, 1986, 1991 and 1996.

    Release date: 2002-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2002001
    Description:

    This study examines the difference in reading performance between students in rural and urban schools. It uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) and the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA).

    Release date: 2002-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002001
    Description:

    Rural areas have a higher incidence of part-time employment. The average annual rate of part-time job growth in rural Canada was higher between 1987 and 1997 than between 1997 and 1999. The predominantly rural provinces have the highest incidence of part-time employment in their rural areas. The majority of part-time employment growth in rural areas is occurring in mainly urban provinces.

    Release date: 2002-10-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020026345
    Description:

    This article looks at those most likely to live alone, the amount of time spent alone on an average day, attitudes to spending time alone and the influence that time spent alone has on overall happiness.

    Release date: 2002-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020026349
    Description:

    This article examines suicide deaths and hospitalized suicide attempts among Canadians aged 10 years or older.

    Release date: 2002-09-17

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20010016268
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    This paper deals with non-response bias, discussing a few approaches in this field. It is demonstrated that non-response bias as to voter turnout is lower in a survey on living conditions than in a purely political survey. In addition, auxiliary information from registrations is used to investigate non-response and its bias among ethnic groups. Response rates among ethnic minority groups are rather low, but there is no evidence that response rates are less in lower social class areas. Correcting for limited socioeconomic deviations does not affect the distributions of political preference.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2002055
    Description:

    This paper examines migration into and out of rural and small town (RST) Canada in order to better understand the contribution that movers have on the RST population. It also examines the moving population aged 15 and over.

    Release date: 2002-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 71-584-M2002004
    Description:

    This paper addresses pay differentials between the sexes in terms of the characteristics of the individual worker, the tasks of the worker, the employment contract between the worker and the workplace, and the contribution of specific workplace characteristics to these pay differentials.

    Release date: 2002-07-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-576-X
    Description:

    The increasing popularity of common-law unions is transforming family life in Canada, according to new data from the 2001 General Social Survey. Over the past 30 years, common-law unions have become more and more popular, especially in Quebec and among younger women in other provinces.

    Although younger women are more likely to start their conjugal life by living common law, most will eventually marry. First common-law unions are twice as likely to end in separation as first marriages. What is more, a growing proportion of women have experienced at least two unions, and the likelihood of choosing a common-law relationship over marriage for the second union is also increasing. The analysis shows that the trends observed in the formation and break-up of unions apply equally to men and women. Since men are on average older than women when they start their conjugal life, they tend to experience the events at an older age.

    Release date: 2002-07-11

  • Table: 85-224-X20020006455
    Description:

    The 1999 General Social Survey was the first attempt by Statistics Canada to measure spousal violence in a comprehensive way on a traditional victimization survey. Both women and men were asked a module of 10 questions concerning violence by their current or previous spouses and common-law partners. The nature of the violence under study ranged in severity from threats to sexual assault and concerned acts that happened in the 12-month and 5-year periods preceding the survey interview.

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20021068442
    Description:

    This article examines how Canadians were housed in 2000. What percentage lived in owner-occupied homes? Were their homes in good condition? Was the size suitable for their needs? And, what proportion of their income was spent on housing?

    Release date: 2002-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020016194
    Description:

    This article looks at the characteristics of Internet dropouts and infrequent users and compares them with Canadians who use the Net regularly.

    Release date: 2002-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020016195
    Description:

    This article compares the activities and time use of Canadians aged 25 to 54 in high- and low-income households.

    Release date: 2002-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020016198
    Description:

    This article explores what Canadian adults who are aged 25 and older and who are employed full-time do over the course of an average day on the weekend.

    Release date: 2002-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002186
    Description:

    Current trends in marriage and fertility patterns suggest that young Canadian women are delaying family formation and concentrating on developing their careers. Using data from the 1998 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, this study provides Canadian evidence on the effect of marital status and parenthood status on the wage rates of Canadian women. As well, this paper attempts to determine whether decisions regarding the timing of family formation influence the wages of women and whether these decisions have a permanent or temporary impact on earnings. The main results of the paper are as follows.

    After controlling for differences in work history, labour force qualifications and selected job characteristics, the cross sectional analysis suggests that there is no association between marital status and wages while the evidence on the relationship between wages and motherhood is mixed.

    When controls for years with children were included, there is a positive association of motherhood with wages that persists in the early years of motherhood but declines as the number of years with children lengthens. These results support the specialization, selection, differential treatment by employers and the work effort explanations for differences in the wages of mothers relative to other women. There is no such finding for married women and the duration of marriage.

    It is a well-documented fact that the acquisition of job-related skills and significant wage growth is concentrated at the start of workers' careers - which generally coincides with decisions regarding marriage and children. If this is the case, then the timing of marriage and children may be considered proxies for omitted, unobserved characteristics, related to human capital skills, differentiated work history or labour force attachment. Conforming to theoretical expectations when the timing of children is taken into account, women that postpone having children earn at least 6.0% more than women who have children early. There is no significant association between the timing of marriage and wages.

    The observed relationship between women's wages and their decision to delay having children tends to persist after the birth of their first child but tends to decline over time. Thus, augmented family responsibilities will tend to reduce any initial wage differentials based on delays of assuming these responsibilities.

    Release date: 2002-05-01

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2001008
    Description:

    This analysis bulletin, the twenty-fourth profiling trends in rural Canada, uses survey data to reveal the seasonal pattern of employment in rural Canada from 1996 to 2000. It is published in collaboration with the Rural Secretariat of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. A higher seasonal variation in employment exists in rural areas compared with urban areas, and is spread throughout virtually all industrial sectors. The lower industrial productivity and reduced wages that likely result present a particular challenge for developing and revitalizing rural areas. This bulleting is useful for researchers and decision-makers who need information on employment seasonality in rural Canada to create appropriate economic strategies.

    Release date: 2002-04-24

  • Journals and periodicals: 75F0048M
    Description:

    This series of reports is from the Nonprofit Sector Knowledge Base Project. Begun in 1997, the Nonprofit Sector Knowledge Base Project is a multi-year initiative to build a corpus of reliable data and knowledge pertaining to the voluntary sector, its organizations, and the contributory behaviour of Canadians. Its component activities include an inventory of existing data resources, studies to identify the distinctive characteristics and the social dynamics of volunteering and giving of volunteers and charitable donors, participating in generating new data via surveys and case studies, assessing the state of existing information on the voluntary sector in Canada, and strengthening conceptual frameworks that will advance our understanding of the voluntary domain. An essential implicit objective has been to encourage a shift from an orientation to short-term, piecemeal data creation on volunteering toward a longer-term perspective on systematic information development. As of December 2001, 25 research reports had been prepared and others are in preparation. (A list of reports from the project is available on request.)

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 75F0048M2002006
    Description:

    This report summarizes and assesses what is known about the voluntary sector.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 75F0048M2002007
    Description:

    This paper reviews principal definitions and boundary and classification issues for the nonprofit sector.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 75F0048M2002008
    Description:

    This paper provides a detailed statistical portrait of Canadian volunteers in 1997.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

Data (5)

Data (5) (5 of 5 results)

Analysis (25)

Analysis (25) (25 of 25 results)

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002002
    Description:

    In 1996, 17% of Canada's total population were immigrants, and 88% of them were living in urban regions. The three provinces with the largest urban centres attracted most immigrants: 55% went to Ontario, 18% to British Columbia and 13% to Quebec, a pattern that has remained constant for immigrants who have arrived since 1961. The remaining 12% (or 580,000 people) were living in predominantly rural regions. They can be characterized by the period in which they arrived in Canada.

    Recent and new immigrants were better educated than pre-1981 immigrants, particularly in terms of university education. But pre-1981 immigrants had the highest employment rate and were more likely to have professional service occupations than the Canadian-born. Visible minority immigrants fared worse, in socio-economic terms, than non-visible minority immigrants; these differences were more pronounced in predominantly rural regions. The profiles of immigrants in predominantly rural regions were similar to those in predominantly urban regions. However, the few immigrants who resided in rural northern regions had a very different and more favourable profile.

    Release date: 2002-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2002001
    Description:

    This study examines the difference in reading performance between students in rural and urban schools. It uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) and the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA).

    Release date: 2002-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002001
    Description:

    Rural areas have a higher incidence of part-time employment. The average annual rate of part-time job growth in rural Canada was higher between 1987 and 1997 than between 1997 and 1999. The predominantly rural provinces have the highest incidence of part-time employment in their rural areas. The majority of part-time employment growth in rural areas is occurring in mainly urban provinces.

    Release date: 2002-10-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020026345
    Description:

    This article looks at those most likely to live alone, the amount of time spent alone on an average day, attitudes to spending time alone and the influence that time spent alone has on overall happiness.

    Release date: 2002-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020026349
    Description:

    This article examines suicide deaths and hospitalized suicide attempts among Canadians aged 10 years or older.

    Release date: 2002-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 71-584-M2002004
    Description:

    This paper addresses pay differentials between the sexes in terms of the characteristics of the individual worker, the tasks of the worker, the employment contract between the worker and the workplace, and the contribution of specific workplace characteristics to these pay differentials.

    Release date: 2002-07-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-576-X
    Description:

    The increasing popularity of common-law unions is transforming family life in Canada, according to new data from the 2001 General Social Survey. Over the past 30 years, common-law unions have become more and more popular, especially in Quebec and among younger women in other provinces.

    Although younger women are more likely to start their conjugal life by living common law, most will eventually marry. First common-law unions are twice as likely to end in separation as first marriages. What is more, a growing proportion of women have experienced at least two unions, and the likelihood of choosing a common-law relationship over marriage for the second union is also increasing. The analysis shows that the trends observed in the formation and break-up of unions apply equally to men and women. Since men are on average older than women when they start their conjugal life, they tend to experience the events at an older age.

    Release date: 2002-07-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20021068442
    Description:

    This article examines how Canadians were housed in 2000. What percentage lived in owner-occupied homes? Were their homes in good condition? Was the size suitable for their needs? And, what proportion of their income was spent on housing?

    Release date: 2002-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020016194
    Description:

    This article looks at the characteristics of Internet dropouts and infrequent users and compares them with Canadians who use the Net regularly.

    Release date: 2002-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020016195
    Description:

    This article compares the activities and time use of Canadians aged 25 to 54 in high- and low-income households.

    Release date: 2002-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020016198
    Description:

    This article explores what Canadian adults who are aged 25 and older and who are employed full-time do over the course of an average day on the weekend.

    Release date: 2002-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002186
    Description:

    Current trends in marriage and fertility patterns suggest that young Canadian women are delaying family formation and concentrating on developing their careers. Using data from the 1998 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, this study provides Canadian evidence on the effect of marital status and parenthood status on the wage rates of Canadian women. As well, this paper attempts to determine whether decisions regarding the timing of family formation influence the wages of women and whether these decisions have a permanent or temporary impact on earnings. The main results of the paper are as follows.

    After controlling for differences in work history, labour force qualifications and selected job characteristics, the cross sectional analysis suggests that there is no association between marital status and wages while the evidence on the relationship between wages and motherhood is mixed.

    When controls for years with children were included, there is a positive association of motherhood with wages that persists in the early years of motherhood but declines as the number of years with children lengthens. These results support the specialization, selection, differential treatment by employers and the work effort explanations for differences in the wages of mothers relative to other women. There is no such finding for married women and the duration of marriage.

    It is a well-documented fact that the acquisition of job-related skills and significant wage growth is concentrated at the start of workers' careers - which generally coincides with decisions regarding marriage and children. If this is the case, then the timing of marriage and children may be considered proxies for omitted, unobserved characteristics, related to human capital skills, differentiated work history or labour force attachment. Conforming to theoretical expectations when the timing of children is taken into account, women that postpone having children earn at least 6.0% more than women who have children early. There is no significant association between the timing of marriage and wages.

    The observed relationship between women's wages and their decision to delay having children tends to persist after the birth of their first child but tends to decline over time. Thus, augmented family responsibilities will tend to reduce any initial wage differentials based on delays of assuming these responsibilities.

    Release date: 2002-05-01

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2001008
    Description:

    This analysis bulletin, the twenty-fourth profiling trends in rural Canada, uses survey data to reveal the seasonal pattern of employment in rural Canada from 1996 to 2000. It is published in collaboration with the Rural Secretariat of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. A higher seasonal variation in employment exists in rural areas compared with urban areas, and is spread throughout virtually all industrial sectors. The lower industrial productivity and reduced wages that likely result present a particular challenge for developing and revitalizing rural areas. This bulleting is useful for researchers and decision-makers who need information on employment seasonality in rural Canada to create appropriate economic strategies.

    Release date: 2002-04-24

  • Journals and periodicals: 75F0048M
    Description:

    This series of reports is from the Nonprofit Sector Knowledge Base Project. Begun in 1997, the Nonprofit Sector Knowledge Base Project is a multi-year initiative to build a corpus of reliable data and knowledge pertaining to the voluntary sector, its organizations, and the contributory behaviour of Canadians. Its component activities include an inventory of existing data resources, studies to identify the distinctive characteristics and the social dynamics of volunteering and giving of volunteers and charitable donors, participating in generating new data via surveys and case studies, assessing the state of existing information on the voluntary sector in Canada, and strengthening conceptual frameworks that will advance our understanding of the voluntary domain. An essential implicit objective has been to encourage a shift from an orientation to short-term, piecemeal data creation on volunteering toward a longer-term perspective on systematic information development. As of December 2001, 25 research reports had been prepared and others are in preparation. (A list of reports from the project is available on request.)

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 75F0048M2002006
    Description:

    This report summarizes and assesses what is known about the voluntary sector.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 75F0048M2002007
    Description:

    This paper reviews principal definitions and boundary and classification issues for the nonprofit sector.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 75F0048M2002008
    Description:

    This paper provides a detailed statistical portrait of Canadian volunteers in 1997.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 75F0048M2002001
    Description:

    This report contains both inventory of and guide to sources of publicly available data on the nonprofit sector in Canada and a discussion of the characteristics and limitations of these data.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 75F0048M2002002
    Description:

    This report describes an in-depth study of 40 volunteer organizations across Ontario in the fall of 1997 and winter of 1998.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 75F0048M2002003
    Description:

    This paper compares the social and demographic characteristics of the small civic core that accounts for about three-quarters of all volunteering, giving and community activities in Canada with those who are relatively inactive in civic affairs.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 75F0048M2002005
    Description:

    This paper provides an analysis of regional differences in the volunteering and charitable giving of Canadians by considering both formal and informal modes of contributing.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2001007
    Description:

    One objective of public policy is to reduce income disparity in Canada. Previous research (e.g. Rupnik, Thompson-James and Bollman (2001)) has indicated that, on average, rural residents have a similar incidence of low income as urban residents. However, there is considerable diversity within rural regions, i.e. the term 'rural' is far from being a homogeneous entity. For example, the rural regions in Ontario are very different from the rural regions in the Prairies due to the differences in population size and access to markets, among other features. Since rural regions across Canada differ economically and socially, it follows that the nature of rural income disparities could also differ across provinces in Canada. The objective of this study is to describe the range in income disparities across rural Canada.

    Release date: 2002-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20021036210
    Description:

    This article examines barriers to job-related training, the groups that experience these obstacles and whether access to training has improved over time.

    Release date: 2002-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2001006
    Description:

    Migration is a concern for rural and small town (RST) areas of Canada as rural development is essentially a demographic phenomenon. To date, there has been little analysis of migration patterns and their affect on RST areas. To better understand the contribution that movers have on the RST population, this paper documents internal migration into and out of RST Canada. Specifically, the characteristics of the moving population that are 15 years of age and over, with a focus on their levels of human capital, are examined. In addition, characteristics of migrating youth are discussed as youth can be seen as an indicator of the state of rural areas and are a key factor in rural development. The understanding of the patterns of migration may give rise to solutions for the retention of human capital in rural and small town areas and the promotion of rural development.

    Release date: 2002-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2001005
    Description:

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) represent both a "problem" and an "opportunity" for rural Canadians. On the one hand, rural employment levels are diminished as more services are supplied to rural Canadians by ICTs - the ubiquitous ATMs (automatic teller machines) are one example. On the other hand, ICTs, and particularly the Internet, provide easier access for rural Canadians to target urban markets and provide urban consumers with easier access to rural goods and services.

    Release date: 2002-01-21

Reference (4)

Reference (4) (4 of 4 results)

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2002061
    Description:

    This paper compares six definitions of the word 'rural' from databases at Statistics Canada. Each definition emphasizes different criteria (population size, density, context) and has different associated thresholds. The size of the territorial units (building blocks) from which each definition is constructed also varies.

    Release date: 2002-12-23

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2002060
    Description:

    This research project provides an overview of diversification and specialization in rural regions and communities for the census years 1981, 1986, 1991 and 1996.

    Release date: 2002-12-04

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20010016268
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    This paper deals with non-response bias, discussing a few approaches in this field. It is demonstrated that non-response bias as to voter turnout is lower in a survey on living conditions than in a purely political survey. In addition, auxiliary information from registrations is used to investigate non-response and its bias among ethnic groups. Response rates among ethnic minority groups are rather low, but there is no evidence that response rates are less in lower social class areas. Correcting for limited socioeconomic deviations does not affect the distributions of political preference.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2002055
    Description:

    This paper examines migration into and out of rural and small town (RST) Canada in order to better understand the contribution that movers have on the RST population. It also examines the moving population aged 15 and over.

    Release date: 2002-09-11

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