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All (34)

All (34) (25 of 34 results)

  • Public use microdata: 12M0024X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 24 (2010) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey.

    Cycle 24 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions.

    The purpose of this survey is to better understand how Canadians spent their time. Time use estimates can be produced based on information reported in the time use diary portion of the survey. This diary provides a detailed record of participation in a wide variety of daily activities, as well as the time devoted to them, where these activities took place, and the social relationships of the respondent. Also, for the first time, the 2010 GSS collected information on simultaneous activities, i.e. those that are performed at the same time as a primary activity. The questionnaire collected additional information on perceptions of time, time spent doing unpaid work, well-being, paid work and education, cultural and sports activities, transportation, and numerous socio economic characteristics.

    Cycle 24 is the fifth cycle of the GSS dedicated to collecting data on time use. Previous cycles had been conducted in 1986, 1992, 1998 and 2005. Cycle 24 includes most of the content from previous cycles as well as new content, added to reflect the society's emerging issues.

    Release date: 2011-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111545
    Description:

    This chapter examines the basic demographic characteristics of women and men with disabilities, the types and causes of their activity limitations, the domain in which the disabilities reported most often manifest themselves, the education and income of women with and without disabilities, and their experiences in the workforce.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111543
    Description:

    This chapter examines five major dimensions of health, comparing women and men in different age groups. The first section looks at well-being and measures of good physical and mental health, including some fitness measures. The second section examines chronic health conditions and mental health problems. The third section shows data on risk factors and health-related behaviours (diet, physical activity and tobacco use). The fourth section deals with accessing and using health care services, and the last section presents statistics on life expectancy, death and causes of death.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111542
    Description:

    This chapter examines different education-related indicators. We begin with a general profile of women's educational attainment, followed by the evolution of their situation in time compared to that of men. We then present more detailed data on the different stages of education, from elementary and high school through to university.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111546
    Description:

    This chapter on families, living arrangements and unpaid work examines the family context and living arrangements of women, including their conjugal lives, and for those in couples, whether they are legal marriages or common-law unions, opposite-sex or same-sex couples, and whether or not there are children present. In addition, female lone-parent families are also analysed, as well as women who live in other arrangements, such as alone or with non-relatives. Other patterns related to births, marriages and divorces are explored, as are family characteristics and living arrangements of immigrant women and visible minority women. Finally, the area of unpaid work is examined, specifically, care of household children, domestic work (including housework and household maintenance) and volunteering.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111577
    Description:

    This Juristat article presents information on perceptions of personal safety and crime as reported by Canadians aged 15 and over living in the ten provinces. Using data from the 2009 General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization, it analyses Canadians' satisfaction with their personal safety from crime while performing specific activities, at both the provincial and census metropolitan area levels. It also includes information on Canadians' perceptions of the level of crime and social disorder in their neighbourhoods.

    Release date: 2011-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211591
    Description:

    This article compares the personal networks of adults aged 25 to 64 living alone with those of adults living in a couple. It provides data on size of networks, frequency of contact and feelings of social loneliness. It also examines the extent to which people living alone are more likely to have personal networks of lower or higher quality than those living in a couple when various factors are taken into account. Data are from the 2008 General Social Survey.

    Release date: 2011-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211592
    Description:

    Recent immigrants are having more difficulty adjusting to the Canadian economy than did their predecessors. It is taking newcomers longer to achieve employment and income levels similar to those of the Canadian-born. Using the General Social Survey conducted in 2008, this article examines whether personal networks, along with more typically-used measures of human capital, might explain differences in employment and income levels between immigrants and other Canadians. Are more limited personal networks associated with lower employment rates and incomes among Canada's more recent immigrants?

    Release date: 2011-11-30

  • Technical products: 21-601-M
    Description:

    The Agriculture Division occasionally publishes working papers on research, analytical results, statistical techniques, methods and concepts.

    Release date: 2011-11-22

  • Table: 85-404-X
    Description:

    This set of fact sheets present national, provincial and territorial data on shelters that provide residential services to abused women and their children. The highlighted information includes profiles of the facilities and services provided, as well as characteristics of residents. Data for these fact sheets are from the Transition Home Survey (THS), a biennial census of all facilities in Canada known to provide residential services to abused women and their children. The THS is conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics as part of the federal government's Family Violence Initiative and collects information on the characteristics of the facilities and the services provided during a 12-month period. Additionally, through the use of a snapshot day survey (mid-April of the collection year), selected characteristics of residents (i.e., reasons for coming to the shelter, relationship to abuser, repeat stays, etc.) are collected.

    Release date: 2011-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011073
    Description:

    This paper examines how the nature of self-employment may have changed, by comparing the labour market transition rates for males (between non-employment, paid employment, own-account self-employment, and self-employment with paid help) in two panels of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID): the 1993-1998 panel and the 2002-2007 panel. An econometric model is then estimated for the purpose of characterizing the change further.

    Release date: 2011-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2008007
    Description:

    This bulletin takes a value chain perspective and assesses the employment shifts between components of the value chain of natural resource sectors within Canada. The analysis also includes a perspective across regions, with an emphasis on Canada's rural and urban regions to help reveal the relevance of the natural resource sector to the rural economy as well as the contribution of the rural economy to national value chains.

    Release date: 2011-10-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211531
    Description:

    This article examines various facets of travelling between home and work. First it provides information about commuting times and how frequently workers are caught in traffic. Second, it looks at workers' perceptions of the time they spend commuting as well as car users' perceptions of public transit. Finally a connection is drawn between the characteristics of commuting to work (commuting time, recurrence of traffic congestion, etc.) and selected subjective measures of quality of life, including stress levels and satisfaction with work-life balance.

    Release date: 2011-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111441
    Description:

    This chapter, entitled Senior Women, provides an overview of the situation of senior women in the population, analyzed from an historical perspective when applicable. We will examine their sociodemographic characteristics, including life expectancy, diversity, and family situation. Various factors are also associated with this population's well-being, such as social life, economic situation and health; we will therefore explore social networks and subjective well-being, volunteering, and the most recent trends in the labour force participation and income of senior women. Finally, we will present the most prevalent chronic health conditions in senior women, their lifestyle habits, the formal and informal care to which they have access, and the causes of death.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111475
    Description:

    The Female Population chapter of Women in Canada presents the socio-demographic and ethno-cultural characteristics of women and girls living in this country. Understanding the current trends related to an aging, and an increasingly diverse female population, can help inform policy and planning. Topics examined in this chapter include the distribution of the female population across the provinces and territories and across age, and the share with an Aboriginal identity. In addition, aspects of diversity within the female population, including immigrant status and visible minority status, will be presented as well as residential mobility, language-related characteristics, and religious affiliation and religiosity. Where appropriate, trends over time will be analyzed and comparisons will be drawn with the male population in order to highlight existing similarities and differences.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111442
    Description:

    This article, First Nations, Métis and Inuit Women explores the diverse circumstances and experiences of Aboriginal women in Canada. Overall, it highlights their demographic characteristics, families, housing, language, employment, income, education, justice and health. Where possible, data on First Nations, Métis and Inuit women are compared with those of their male counterparts and with non-Aboriginal women.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111528
    Description:

    The chapter provided a statistical overview of the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the immigrant women in Canada. Drawing data from the censuses and administrative sources, the chapter looked at the socio-demographic trends of the female population who came to live in Canada as immigrants. The information included growth and geographic distribution of the female immigrant population, the changing make-up of immigrant women in terms of their language profile, country of birth and visible minority status, as well as the categories under which female permanent residents were admitted to Canada. The socio-economic conditions of immigrant women, such as educational attainment, field of study, occupational group, labour market participation, earnings and component of income were examined and compared with women who were born in Canada. While census was the main data source for the analysis of the population's socio-economic situations, where applicable, data from the Labour Force Survey and the Longitudinal Immigration Data Base were also included.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111527
    Description:

    The chapter provided a statistical overview of the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the female visible minority population in Canada. Drawing mainly data from the 2006 Census, the chapter looked at the growth and the geographical distribution of the population, its family situation and language characteristics as well as its diversity in terms of generational status and country of birth. The chapter also presented results of the analysis on educational attainment, labour market experience and economic well-being such as earnings and components of income. The analyses compared the situations of visible minority women with those of women who did not report visible minority status and those of visible minority men. Where applicable, immigrant status was taken into account in the examination of the experience of visible minority women, i.e., comparison was made between visible minority women who were born in Canada and those who came to live as immigrants. As well, the differences among the groups that made up the visible minority population were highlighted.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-647-X
    Description:

    This publication provides an overview of the time use of Canadians produced from the 2010 General Social Survey on Time Stress and Well-being. It presents information on participation rates and average amount of time spent on various activities and compares recent data with information obtained from a similar survey conducted in 1998. In addition, it examines Canadians' perceptions of time stress.

    Release date: 2011-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211520
    Description:

    Research suggests that the division of labour and the role expectations for men and women are continuing to evolve. This may be especially true for Generation Y, those born between 1980 and 1995 and who grew up during a period of changing family dynamics and family formation. Using General Social Survey - Time use data from 1986, 1998 and 2010 this article examines the changes in the participation in, and time spent on paid work and unpaid household work of individuals aged 20 to 29 from three generations' late baby boomers, Generation X and Generation Y. The final section looks at the distribution of time spent on paid and unpaid work within dual-earner couples.

    Release date: 2011-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111495
    Description:

    This Juristat article analyses residential facilities in Canada that offered shelter to abused women in 2010. It presents information on the different types of facilities, the number of annual admissions, the reasons that women seek shelter and the variety of services offered to clients. In addition, this article examines the use of shelters that offer culturally sensitive services to Aboriginal people, living both on and off reserves. The data for this article was collected by the 2010 Transition Home Survey (THS), a census of residential facilities for female victims of abuse conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics as part of the federal government's Family Violence Initiative. Annual admissions and expenditures information pertain to a 12-month period over 2009/2010, while other admissions and client characteristics are based on a one-day "snapshot" date of April 15, 2010. Comparisons using time-series data from the THS Trend File are also included. The THS Trend File contains only those facilities that have participated in each cycle of the survey since the 2002 survey cycle.

    Release date: 2011-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2008006
    Description:

    This study examines the recent changes in the number and types of manufacturing firms in rural and small town areas; identifies the number and change in manufacturing firms that are part of the value chain of a resource sector; and examines the number and change in manufacturing firms located in rural resource-reliant communities.

    Release date: 2011-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111439
    Description:

    This Juristat article presents information on violent victimization as reported by Aboriginal women living in the ten provinces during 2009. It analyses the characteristics associated with such incidents, including the socio-demographic characteristics of victims, offender characteristics, reporting incidents to police, consequences of victimization, and perceptions of personal safety and the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2011-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111416
    Description:

    The chapter entitled Women and the criminal justice system explores the prevalence and nature of female victimization, female criminality, as well as the processing of female offenders through the criminal justice system in Canada. Specifically, the types of offences perpetrated against females and by females are examined, as are trends over time in police-reported incidents, completed court cases and admissions to provincial and federal correctional services. Trends involving female youth and female adult offenders are explored separately.

    Release date: 2011-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111413
    Description:

    Many things influence how Canadians navigate their way through the many financial options and services available. One of the factors affecting the finances of individuals is their level of financial knowledge. This article uses the objective assessment (quiz) of financial knowledge that was asked as part of the Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS) in 2009. It explores, for the first time in a national Canadian context, how personal financial knowledge is related to someone's socio-demographic characteristics and other financial behaviours such as having a budget or having investments.

    Release date: 2011-03-08

Data (10)

Data (10) (10 of 10 results)

  • Public use microdata: 12M0024X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 24 (2010) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey.

    Cycle 24 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions.

    The purpose of this survey is to better understand how Canadians spent their time. Time use estimates can be produced based on information reported in the time use diary portion of the survey. This diary provides a detailed record of participation in a wide variety of daily activities, as well as the time devoted to them, where these activities took place, and the social relationships of the respondent. Also, for the first time, the 2010 GSS collected information on simultaneous activities, i.e. those that are performed at the same time as a primary activity. The questionnaire collected additional information on perceptions of time, time spent doing unpaid work, well-being, paid work and education, cultural and sports activities, transportation, and numerous socio economic characteristics.

    Cycle 24 is the fifth cycle of the GSS dedicated to collecting data on time use. Previous cycles had been conducted in 1986, 1992, 1998 and 2005. Cycle 24 includes most of the content from previous cycles as well as new content, added to reflect the society's emerging issues.

    Release date: 2011-12-15

  • Table: 85-404-X
    Description:

    This set of fact sheets present national, provincial and territorial data on shelters that provide residential services to abused women and their children. The highlighted information includes profiles of the facilities and services provided, as well as characteristics of residents. Data for these fact sheets are from the Transition Home Survey (THS), a biennial census of all facilities in Canada known to provide residential services to abused women and their children. The THS is conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics as part of the federal government's Family Violence Initiative and collects information on the characteristics of the facilities and the services provided during a 12-month period. Additionally, through the use of a snapshot day survey (mid-April of the collection year), selected characteristics of residents (i.e., reasons for coming to the shelter, relationship to abuser, repeat stays, etc.) are collected.

    Release date: 2011-10-25

  • Public use microdata: 12M0023X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 23 (2009) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey.

    Cycle 23 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions.

    The purpose of this survey is to better understand how Canadians perceive crime and the justice system and their experiences of victimization. The survey is designed to produce estimates of the extent to which persons are the victims of eight types of offences (assault, sexual assault, robbery, theft of personal property, breaking and entering, motor vehicle theft, theft of household property and vandalism); to examine the risk factors associated with victimization; to examine the rates of reporting to the police; and to evaluate the fear of crime and public perceptions of crime and the criminal justice system.

    Cycle 23 is the fifth cycle of the GSS dedicated to collecting data on victimization. Previous cycles had been conducted in 1988, 1993, 1999 and 2004. Cycle 23 includes most of the content from previous cycles as well as new content, added to reflect the society's emerging issues of crime prevention and Internet victimization.

    Release date: 2011-02-10

  • Public use microdata: 11-625-X
    Description:

    This subscription-based service offers institutional access to the collection of available Statistics Canada public use microdata files (PUMF). For a yearly fee, designated contacts at subscribing institutions can have unlimited access to all microdata and documentation available in the PUMF collection. Public use microdata files contain anonymized, non-aggregated data. Using statistical software, the end user can group and manipulate data variables in these files to suit data and research requirements.

    Release date: 2011-01-17

Analysis (23)

Analysis (23) (23 of 23 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111545
    Description:

    This chapter examines the basic demographic characteristics of women and men with disabilities, the types and causes of their activity limitations, the domain in which the disabilities reported most often manifest themselves, the education and income of women with and without disabilities, and their experiences in the workforce.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111543
    Description:

    This chapter examines five major dimensions of health, comparing women and men in different age groups. The first section looks at well-being and measures of good physical and mental health, including some fitness measures. The second section examines chronic health conditions and mental health problems. The third section shows data on risk factors and health-related behaviours (diet, physical activity and tobacco use). The fourth section deals with accessing and using health care services, and the last section presents statistics on life expectancy, death and causes of death.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111542
    Description:

    This chapter examines different education-related indicators. We begin with a general profile of women's educational attainment, followed by the evolution of their situation in time compared to that of men. We then present more detailed data on the different stages of education, from elementary and high school through to university.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111546
    Description:

    This chapter on families, living arrangements and unpaid work examines the family context and living arrangements of women, including their conjugal lives, and for those in couples, whether they are legal marriages or common-law unions, opposite-sex or same-sex couples, and whether or not there are children present. In addition, female lone-parent families are also analysed, as well as women who live in other arrangements, such as alone or with non-relatives. Other patterns related to births, marriages and divorces are explored, as are family characteristics and living arrangements of immigrant women and visible minority women. Finally, the area of unpaid work is examined, specifically, care of household children, domestic work (including housework and household maintenance) and volunteering.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111577
    Description:

    This Juristat article presents information on perceptions of personal safety and crime as reported by Canadians aged 15 and over living in the ten provinces. Using data from the 2009 General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization, it analyses Canadians' satisfaction with their personal safety from crime while performing specific activities, at both the provincial and census metropolitan area levels. It also includes information on Canadians' perceptions of the level of crime and social disorder in their neighbourhoods.

    Release date: 2011-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211591
    Description:

    This article compares the personal networks of adults aged 25 to 64 living alone with those of adults living in a couple. It provides data on size of networks, frequency of contact and feelings of social loneliness. It also examines the extent to which people living alone are more likely to have personal networks of lower or higher quality than those living in a couple when various factors are taken into account. Data are from the 2008 General Social Survey.

    Release date: 2011-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211592
    Description:

    Recent immigrants are having more difficulty adjusting to the Canadian economy than did their predecessors. It is taking newcomers longer to achieve employment and income levels similar to those of the Canadian-born. Using the General Social Survey conducted in 2008, this article examines whether personal networks, along with more typically-used measures of human capital, might explain differences in employment and income levels between immigrants and other Canadians. Are more limited personal networks associated with lower employment rates and incomes among Canada's more recent immigrants?

    Release date: 2011-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011073
    Description:

    This paper examines how the nature of self-employment may have changed, by comparing the labour market transition rates for males (between non-employment, paid employment, own-account self-employment, and self-employment with paid help) in two panels of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID): the 1993-1998 panel and the 2002-2007 panel. An econometric model is then estimated for the purpose of characterizing the change further.

    Release date: 2011-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2008007
    Description:

    This bulletin takes a value chain perspective and assesses the employment shifts between components of the value chain of natural resource sectors within Canada. The analysis also includes a perspective across regions, with an emphasis on Canada's rural and urban regions to help reveal the relevance of the natural resource sector to the rural economy as well as the contribution of the rural economy to national value chains.

    Release date: 2011-10-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211531
    Description:

    This article examines various facets of travelling between home and work. First it provides information about commuting times and how frequently workers are caught in traffic. Second, it looks at workers' perceptions of the time they spend commuting as well as car users' perceptions of public transit. Finally a connection is drawn between the characteristics of commuting to work (commuting time, recurrence of traffic congestion, etc.) and selected subjective measures of quality of life, including stress levels and satisfaction with work-life balance.

    Release date: 2011-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111441
    Description:

    This chapter, entitled Senior Women, provides an overview of the situation of senior women in the population, analyzed from an historical perspective when applicable. We will examine their sociodemographic characteristics, including life expectancy, diversity, and family situation. Various factors are also associated with this population's well-being, such as social life, economic situation and health; we will therefore explore social networks and subjective well-being, volunteering, and the most recent trends in the labour force participation and income of senior women. Finally, we will present the most prevalent chronic health conditions in senior women, their lifestyle habits, the formal and informal care to which they have access, and the causes of death.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111475
    Description:

    The Female Population chapter of Women in Canada presents the socio-demographic and ethno-cultural characteristics of women and girls living in this country. Understanding the current trends related to an aging, and an increasingly diverse female population, can help inform policy and planning. Topics examined in this chapter include the distribution of the female population across the provinces and territories and across age, and the share with an Aboriginal identity. In addition, aspects of diversity within the female population, including immigrant status and visible minority status, will be presented as well as residential mobility, language-related characteristics, and religious affiliation and religiosity. Where appropriate, trends over time will be analyzed and comparisons will be drawn with the male population in order to highlight existing similarities and differences.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111442
    Description:

    This article, First Nations, Métis and Inuit Women explores the diverse circumstances and experiences of Aboriginal women in Canada. Overall, it highlights their demographic characteristics, families, housing, language, employment, income, education, justice and health. Where possible, data on First Nations, Métis and Inuit women are compared with those of their male counterparts and with non-Aboriginal women.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111528
    Description:

    The chapter provided a statistical overview of the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the immigrant women in Canada. Drawing data from the censuses and administrative sources, the chapter looked at the socio-demographic trends of the female population who came to live in Canada as immigrants. The information included growth and geographic distribution of the female immigrant population, the changing make-up of immigrant women in terms of their language profile, country of birth and visible minority status, as well as the categories under which female permanent residents were admitted to Canada. The socio-economic conditions of immigrant women, such as educational attainment, field of study, occupational group, labour market participation, earnings and component of income were examined and compared with women who were born in Canada. While census was the main data source for the analysis of the population's socio-economic situations, where applicable, data from the Labour Force Survey and the Longitudinal Immigration Data Base were also included.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111527
    Description:

    The chapter provided a statistical overview of the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the female visible minority population in Canada. Drawing mainly data from the 2006 Census, the chapter looked at the growth and the geographical distribution of the population, its family situation and language characteristics as well as its diversity in terms of generational status and country of birth. The chapter also presented results of the analysis on educational attainment, labour market experience and economic well-being such as earnings and components of income. The analyses compared the situations of visible minority women with those of women who did not report visible minority status and those of visible minority men. Where applicable, immigrant status was taken into account in the examination of the experience of visible minority women, i.e., comparison was made between visible minority women who were born in Canada and those who came to live as immigrants. As well, the differences among the groups that made up the visible minority population were highlighted.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-647-X
    Description:

    This publication provides an overview of the time use of Canadians produced from the 2010 General Social Survey on Time Stress and Well-being. It presents information on participation rates and average amount of time spent on various activities and compares recent data with information obtained from a similar survey conducted in 1998. In addition, it examines Canadians' perceptions of time stress.

    Release date: 2011-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211520
    Description:

    Research suggests that the division of labour and the role expectations for men and women are continuing to evolve. This may be especially true for Generation Y, those born between 1980 and 1995 and who grew up during a period of changing family dynamics and family formation. Using General Social Survey - Time use data from 1986, 1998 and 2010 this article examines the changes in the participation in, and time spent on paid work and unpaid household work of individuals aged 20 to 29 from three generations' late baby boomers, Generation X and Generation Y. The final section looks at the distribution of time spent on paid and unpaid work within dual-earner couples.

    Release date: 2011-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111495
    Description:

    This Juristat article analyses residential facilities in Canada that offered shelter to abused women in 2010. It presents information on the different types of facilities, the number of annual admissions, the reasons that women seek shelter and the variety of services offered to clients. In addition, this article examines the use of shelters that offer culturally sensitive services to Aboriginal people, living both on and off reserves. The data for this article was collected by the 2010 Transition Home Survey (THS), a census of residential facilities for female victims of abuse conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics as part of the federal government's Family Violence Initiative. Annual admissions and expenditures information pertain to a 12-month period over 2009/2010, while other admissions and client characteristics are based on a one-day "snapshot" date of April 15, 2010. Comparisons using time-series data from the THS Trend File are also included. The THS Trend File contains only those facilities that have participated in each cycle of the survey since the 2002 survey cycle.

    Release date: 2011-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2008006
    Description:

    This study examines the recent changes in the number and types of manufacturing firms in rural and small town areas; identifies the number and change in manufacturing firms that are part of the value chain of a resource sector; and examines the number and change in manufacturing firms located in rural resource-reliant communities.

    Release date: 2011-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111439
    Description:

    This Juristat article presents information on violent victimization as reported by Aboriginal women living in the ten provinces during 2009. It analyses the characteristics associated with such incidents, including the socio-demographic characteristics of victims, offender characteristics, reporting incidents to police, consequences of victimization, and perceptions of personal safety and the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2011-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111416
    Description:

    The chapter entitled Women and the criminal justice system explores the prevalence and nature of female victimization, female criminality, as well as the processing of female offenders through the criminal justice system in Canada. Specifically, the types of offences perpetrated against females and by females are examined, as are trends over time in police-reported incidents, completed court cases and admissions to provincial and federal correctional services. Trends involving female youth and female adult offenders are explored separately.

    Release date: 2011-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111413
    Description:

    Many things influence how Canadians navigate their way through the many financial options and services available. One of the factors affecting the finances of individuals is their level of financial knowledge. This article uses the objective assessment (quiz) of financial knowledge that was asked as part of the Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS) in 2009. It explores, for the first time in a national Canadian context, how personal financial knowledge is related to someone's socio-demographic characteristics and other financial behaviours such as having a budget or having investments.

    Release date: 2011-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111399
    Description:

    This article uses data from the General Social Survey (GSS) from 2003 and 2008 to explore consumers' propensity to choose some products and boycott others based on ethical criteria. It compares the evolution of citizens' ethical consumption to other types of political participation. It also provides information on the persons most likely to choose or boycott a product for ethical reasons.

    Release date: 2011-01-25

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