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All (5)

All (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-04-14

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-04-19

  • Table: 89-625-X
    Description:

    Cycle 20 of the General Social Survey (GSS) is the fourth cycle to collect detailed information on family life in Canada. The previous GSS cycles that collected family data were Cycles 5, 10 and 15. Topics include demographic characteristics such as age, sex, and marital status; family origin of parents; departure from the parental home; marriages of respondent; common-law unions of respondent; fertility and family intentions; birth and adoption; child custody; financial support agreement or arrangement for children and ex-spouse/partner; social networks; work-family balance and family functioning; work history and maternity and paternity leave. The GSS also gathered data on the respondent's main activity and other socio-demographic characteristics. The target population for Cycle 20 of the GSS is all persons 15 years of age and older in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut, and full-time residents of institutions.

    Release date: 2007-08-23

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-576-X
    Description:

    The increasing popularity of common-law unions is transforming family life in Canada, according to new data from the 2001 General Social Survey. Over the past 30 years, common-law unions have become more and more popular, especially in Quebec and among younger women in other provinces.

    Although younger women are more likely to start their conjugal life by living common law, most will eventually marry. First common-law unions are twice as likely to end in separation as first marriages. What is more, a growing proportion of women have experienced at least two unions, and the likelihood of choosing a common-law relationship over marriage for the second union is also increasing. The analysis shows that the trends observed in the formation and break-up of unions apply equally to men and women. Since men are on average older than women when they start their conjugal life, they tend to experience the events at an older age.

    Release date: 2002-07-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-508-X
    Description:

    This national study looks at the kinds of family and friendship links upon which seniors rely for support. With an analysis of data collected in the 1985 General Social Survey, the publication shows how the network of family and friendship ties which one can expect to have, varies systematically over the course of one's life. The study demonstrates the substantial levels of help given to others by seniors, as well as the help they receive.

    Release date: 1989-04-01

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 89-625-X
    Description:

    Cycle 20 of the General Social Survey (GSS) is the fourth cycle to collect detailed information on family life in Canada. The previous GSS cycles that collected family data were Cycles 5, 10 and 15. Topics include demographic characteristics such as age, sex, and marital status; family origin of parents; departure from the parental home; marriages of respondent; common-law unions of respondent; fertility and family intentions; birth and adoption; child custody; financial support agreement or arrangement for children and ex-spouse/partner; social networks; work-family balance and family functioning; work history and maternity and paternity leave. The GSS also gathered data on the respondent's main activity and other socio-demographic characteristics. The target population for Cycle 20 of the GSS is all persons 15 years of age and older in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut, and full-time residents of institutions.

    Release date: 2007-08-23

Analysis (4)

Analysis (4) (4 of 4 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-04-14

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-04-19

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-576-X
    Description:

    The increasing popularity of common-law unions is transforming family life in Canada, according to new data from the 2001 General Social Survey. Over the past 30 years, common-law unions have become more and more popular, especially in Quebec and among younger women in other provinces.

    Although younger women are more likely to start their conjugal life by living common law, most will eventually marry. First common-law unions are twice as likely to end in separation as first marriages. What is more, a growing proportion of women have experienced at least two unions, and the likelihood of choosing a common-law relationship over marriage for the second union is also increasing. The analysis shows that the trends observed in the formation and break-up of unions apply equally to men and women. Since men are on average older than women when they start their conjugal life, they tend to experience the events at an older age.

    Release date: 2002-07-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-508-X
    Description:

    This national study looks at the kinds of family and friendship links upon which seniors rely for support. With an analysis of data collected in the 1985 General Social Survey, the publication shows how the network of family and friendship ties which one can expect to have, varies systematically over the course of one's life. The study demonstrates the substantial levels of help given to others by seniors, as well as the help they receive.

    Release date: 1989-04-01

Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

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