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  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-10-02

  • Public use microdata: 89M0034X
    Description:

    This package was designed to help users access and manipulate the public use microdata file (PUMF) for the 2015 General Social Survey (GSS) on Time Use. It contains the PUMF data and describes the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures for this survey as well as guidelines for releasing estimates.

    The 2015 GSS was the sixth cycle to collect information on Time Use. The previous iterations of the survey were in 1986, 1992, 1998, 2005 and 2010. The 2015 GSS collected data from persons aged 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut and full time residents of institutions.

    Release date: 2017-10-02

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-06-01

  • Technical products: 89-658-X
    Description:

    This short technical note provides additional information on mitigating the risk of non-response bias and how data are fit for use.

    Release date: 2017-06-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-652-X
    Description:

    This publication presents key highlights and results from the General Social Survey on the topics of caregiving and care receiving; social identity; giving, volunteering and participating; victimization; time use; and family.

    Release date: 2017-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2017001
    Description:

    This article compares Canadians fathers' and mothers' participation in domestic tasks and care to children for the past 30 years. The results are based on data from the 2015 and 1986 General Social Survey on Time Use.

    Release date: 2017-06-01

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2013002
    Description:

    This article examines the social participation of full-time workers, both formal (i.e., volunteering for organizations) and informal (i.e., helping friends, neighbours). We also look at relatively unexplored factors of social participation, such as flexibility of working conditions, commuting time and worker categories.

    Release date: 2013-04-02

  • Public use microdata: 12M0024X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 24 (2010) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey.

    Cycle 24 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions.

    The purpose of this survey is to better understand how Canadians spent their time. Time use estimates can be produced based on information reported in the time use diary portion of the survey. This diary provides a detailed record of participation in a wide variety of daily activities, as well as the time devoted to them, where these activities took place, and the social relationships of the respondent. Also, for the first time, the 2010 GSS collected information on simultaneous activities, i.e. those that are performed at the same time as a primary activity. The questionnaire collected additional information on perceptions of time, time spent doing unpaid work, well-being, paid work and education, cultural and sports activities, transportation, and numerous socio economic characteristics.

    Cycle 24 is the fifth cycle of the GSS dedicated to collecting data on time use. Previous cycles had been conducted in 1986, 1992, 1998 and 2005. Cycle 24 includes most of the content from previous cycles as well as new content, added to reflect the society's emerging issues.

    Release date: 2011-12-15

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-647-X
    Description:

    This publication provides an overview of the time use of Canadians produced from the 2010 General Social Survey on Time Stress and Well-being. It presents information on participation rates and average amount of time spent on various activities and compares recent data with information obtained from a similar survey conducted in 1998. In addition, it examines Canadians' perceptions of time stress.

    Release date: 2011-07-12

  • Table: Summary table
    Release date: 2009-09-08

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2008016
    Description:

    The Internet's rapid and profound entry into our lives quite understandably makes people wonder how, both individually and collectively, we have been affected by it. When major shifts in technology use occur, utopian and dystopian views of their impact on society often abound, reflecting their disruptiveness and people's concerns. Given its complex uses, the Internet, both as a technology and as an environment, has had both beneficial and deleterious effects. Above all, though, it has had transformative effects.

    Are Canadians becoming more isolated, more reclusive and less integrated in their communities as they use the Internet? Or, are they becoming more participatory and more integrated in their communities? In addition, do these communities still resemble traditional communities, or are they becoming more like social networks than cohesive groups?

    To address these questions, this article organizes, analyzes and presents existing Canadian evidence. It uses survey results and research amassed by Statistics Canada and the Connected Lives project in Toronto to explore the role of the Internet in social engagement and the opportunities it represents for Canadians to be active citizens. It finds that Internet users are at least as socially engaged as non-users. They have large networks and frequent interactions with friends and family, although they tend to spend somewhat less in-person time and, of course, more time online. An appreciable number of Internet users are civically and politically engaged, using the Internet to find out about opportunities and make contact with others.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Public use microdata: 12M0019X
    Description:

    The core content of time use repeats that of cycle 12 (1998), cycle 7 (1992) and cycle 2 (1986), and provides data on the daily activities of Canadians. Question modules were also included on unpaid work activities, cultural activities, social networks and participation in sports. The target population of the General Social Survey consisted of all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 2006-11-20

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-622-X
    Description:

    This series presents detailed analyses based on the 2005 General Social Survey on Time Use data. Each report covers a specific subject developed from detailed information on the daily activities of Canadians. Links to other products related to time use are also available.

    Release date: 2006-11-20

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-622-X2006003
    Description:

    The General Social Survey (GSS) is an annual survey that monitors changes and emerging trends in Canadian Society. For the fourth time in Canada, the GSS has collected national level time use data. The GSS is funded through a government initiative aimed to fill data gaps for policy research. In this paper we present the policy framework that supports the survey, and discuss the impact of that framework on the content decisions that GSS has made. Following a brief review of the major findings from the first three cycles of time use data we discuss the lessons learned and best practices in the development, collection and processing of these data in Canada. Finally, we compare the methods and content of the Canadian time use survey with the US survey.

    Release date: 2006-11-20

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-622-X2006002
    Description:

    This study provides a detailed analysis of findings based on the 2005 General Social Survey on Time Use, with some analysis of trends over time using the 1992 and 1998 time use surveys. It addresses whether older Canadians are aging well by examining the relative importance their time use patterns and health have on their overall life satisfaction.

    Like other countries in the Western world, Canada's population is aging. For more than a decade, our society has been concerned with the negative aspects of population aging such as how to care for those who are old, or how to manage pension schemes for increasing numbers of retirees. Yet with the impending retirement of a large cohort of baby boomers, the attention has been turned to more positive aspects of aging.

    The term 'aging well' now has become part of the language when thinking about older adults. Aging is seen as an ongoing process of managing the challenges associated with life transitions and with changing levels of personal resources such as health, wealth and social connections. Those who age well are able to find a balance or fit between their activities and these resources and to remain satisfied with their lives.

    For women and men, and for younger and older seniors, the ideal balance may differ, though for both, health is a key resource. In fact, one of the key theories of aging well is that those who are in good health have the potential to have more choices over their daily activities and are more likely to feel satisfied with their lives. Active engagement is seen as another key component of aging well.

    Time use patterns of older Canadians provide a useful window into understanding aging well. This study examines the main components of aging well-activity patterns and health of older Canadians. It considers several questions about aging well:1. What are the activity patterns of older Canadians? 2. What are the trends in activity patterns over time?

    These two questions provide a picture of how older adults are engaged in various activities and whether levels of activity patterns change with age:3. What are the levels of health of older Canadians?4. How do levels of health change with age?

    These two questions provide a picture of how the 'resource' of health may differ among older Canadians.

    5. What is the relationship among activity patterns, health and life satisfaction?This final question provides insight into the relative importance of health and activity level in aging well.

    Release date: 2006-07-26

  • Table: 12F0080X
    Description:

    This publication presents a series of tabulations produced from the General Social Survey on time use of Canadians. It includes information on average amounts of time spent on various activities by sex, by age, by selected role groups.

    Release date: 2006-07-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-622-X2006001
    Description:

    Using data from the General Social Survey on Time Use for 1992, 1998, and 2005, this article analyses the changes in average commute times between home and work. Information is broken down by province, selected census metropolitan areas and mode of transportation used.

    There is also an analysis of the factors involved in increased or decreased commute times for workers between home and work (during weekdays). The analysis shows that in addition to the distance from work, the metropolitan area of residence, whether or not errands are involved and the mode of transportation used all have a major impact on workers' commute times.

    Release date: 2006-07-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-584-M
    Description:

    This study provides a detailed analysis of findings based on the 1998 General Social Survey on Time Use, with some analysis of trends over time using the 1986 and 1992 time use surveys. It addresses the question of how life transitions affect time use patterns and quality of life indicators.

    Like other resources, time is finite. Unlike other resources, time is shared equally by everyone. The trade-offs people make between competing activities depend largely on the nature of their roles and obligations at each stage of life. These trade-offs say a great deal about a person's lifestyle, preferences and choices, or lack of choice. However, the life cycle has lost the uniformity and formality that it once had. Life-course patterns are now more diverse, and the transitions themselves are more likely to be experienced as extended and complex processes rather than as distinct events. Thus, it becomes important to study the impact of various life transitions on time use and quality of life.

    This study examines the following life transitions, with a focus on a comparison of the experiences of women and men:- transition from school to employment- transitions related to union formation and parenthood- transition to retirement- transitions associated with aging: widowhood and changes in living arrangements

    Release date: 2004-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2003004
    Description:

    This paper presents an examination of the daily lives, lifestyles and quality of life of Canadians at all stages in the life course. The transitional events studied in this document include: leaving school and entering the workforce leaving the household of origin to establish one's own household becoming a spouse or life partner becoming a parent retirement transitions associated with old age, death of a spouse and changes in living arrangements

    We examine the way in which time is allocated across four aggregate activity categories (paid work and education, unpaid work, recreation and leisure, and personal care) and how time is distributed among the subcategories within each category. In order to better understand the personal, policy and practice relevance of life course transitions, we compare how respondents who have and have not experienced each transition event feel about their lives and about how they spend their time.

    Release date: 2004-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2003001
    Description:

    This study explores the relationship involving work, parenthood and time scarcity by comparing the experiences of women and men who have recently become parents. It examines how the transition to parenthood affects men and women differently with respect to time use, division of labour and perceptions of time.

    Release date: 2003-07-21

Data (11)

Data (11) (11 of 11 results)

Analysis (12)

Analysis (12) (12 of 12 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-10-02

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-06-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-652-X
    Description:

    This publication presents key highlights and results from the General Social Survey on the topics of caregiving and care receiving; social identity; giving, volunteering and participating; victimization; time use; and family.

    Release date: 2017-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2017001
    Description:

    This article compares Canadians fathers' and mothers' participation in domestic tasks and care to children for the past 30 years. The results are based on data from the 2015 and 1986 General Social Survey on Time Use.

    Release date: 2017-06-01

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2013002
    Description:

    This article examines the social participation of full-time workers, both formal (i.e., volunteering for organizations) and informal (i.e., helping friends, neighbours). We also look at relatively unexplored factors of social participation, such as flexibility of working conditions, commuting time and worker categories.

    Release date: 2013-04-02

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-647-X
    Description:

    This publication provides an overview of the time use of Canadians produced from the 2010 General Social Survey on Time Stress and Well-being. It presents information on participation rates and average amount of time spent on various activities and compares recent data with information obtained from a similar survey conducted in 1998. In addition, it examines Canadians' perceptions of time stress.

    Release date: 2011-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2008016
    Description:

    The Internet's rapid and profound entry into our lives quite understandably makes people wonder how, both individually and collectively, we have been affected by it. When major shifts in technology use occur, utopian and dystopian views of their impact on society often abound, reflecting their disruptiveness and people's concerns. Given its complex uses, the Internet, both as a technology and as an environment, has had both beneficial and deleterious effects. Above all, though, it has had transformative effects.

    Are Canadians becoming more isolated, more reclusive and less integrated in their communities as they use the Internet? Or, are they becoming more participatory and more integrated in their communities? In addition, do these communities still resemble traditional communities, or are they becoming more like social networks than cohesive groups?

    To address these questions, this article organizes, analyzes and presents existing Canadian evidence. It uses survey results and research amassed by Statistics Canada and the Connected Lives project in Toronto to explore the role of the Internet in social engagement and the opportunities it represents for Canadians to be active citizens. It finds that Internet users are at least as socially engaged as non-users. They have large networks and frequent interactions with friends and family, although they tend to spend somewhat less in-person time and, of course, more time online. An appreciable number of Internet users are civically and politically engaged, using the Internet to find out about opportunities and make contact with others.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-584-M
    Description:

    This study provides a detailed analysis of findings based on the 1998 General Social Survey on Time Use, with some analysis of trends over time using the 1986 and 1992 time use surveys. It addresses the question of how life transitions affect time use patterns and quality of life indicators.

    Like other resources, time is finite. Unlike other resources, time is shared equally by everyone. The trade-offs people make between competing activities depend largely on the nature of their roles and obligations at each stage of life. These trade-offs say a great deal about a person's lifestyle, preferences and choices, or lack of choice. However, the life cycle has lost the uniformity and formality that it once had. Life-course patterns are now more diverse, and the transitions themselves are more likely to be experienced as extended and complex processes rather than as distinct events. Thus, it becomes important to study the impact of various life transitions on time use and quality of life.

    This study examines the following life transitions, with a focus on a comparison of the experiences of women and men:- transition from school to employment- transitions related to union formation and parenthood- transition to retirement- transitions associated with aging: widowhood and changes in living arrangements

    Release date: 2004-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2003004
    Description:

    This paper presents an examination of the daily lives, lifestyles and quality of life of Canadians at all stages in the life course. The transitional events studied in this document include: leaving school and entering the workforce leaving the household of origin to establish one's own household becoming a spouse or life partner becoming a parent retirement transitions associated with old age, death of a spouse and changes in living arrangements

    We examine the way in which time is allocated across four aggregate activity categories (paid work and education, unpaid work, recreation and leisure, and personal care) and how time is distributed among the subcategories within each category. In order to better understand the personal, policy and practice relevance of life course transitions, we compare how respondents who have and have not experienced each transition event feel about their lives and about how they spend their time.

    Release date: 2004-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2003001
    Description:

    This study explores the relationship involving work, parenthood and time scarcity by comparing the experiences of women and men who have recently become parents. It examines how the transition to parenthood affects men and women differently with respect to time use, division of labour and perceptions of time.

    Release date: 2003-07-21

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-544-X
    Description:

    This study provides a detailed analysis of findings based on the 1992 General Social Survey of Time Use. It examines the daily behaviour patterns and inherent time stress of key population groups among Canadians aged 15 and over. Men and women have been grouped into four broad age categories: youths, 15 to 24; baby boomers, 25-44; mid-agers, 45-64; and seniors, 65 and over. Key population cohorts were subsequently created by combining the significant dimensions that make up the various roles that individuals play over the life cycle (e.g., main activity, sex, marital status, child status and for seniors, living arrangements).

    Inter-group differences are explored in the average time spent on both paid and unpaid work activities, personal care and the time left for leisure activities. A number of issues are investigated such as equality of work and leisure within the family, the impact of the influx of women into the labour force, the responsibility for care giving of children and elderly parents, and more general concerns related to the aging of the population. As well, inter-group differences in the tensions arising from the effort to balance work and educational responsibilities with personal needs and family obligations are examined. The concluding chapter provides a snapshot of Canadian men and women at work and at play at various stages over the life cycle.

    Release date: 1995-12-06

Reference (5)

Reference (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Technical products: 89-658-X
    Description:

    This short technical note provides additional information on mitigating the risk of non-response bias and how data are fit for use.

    Release date: 2017-06-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-622-X
    Description:

    This series presents detailed analyses based on the 2005 General Social Survey on Time Use data. Each report covers a specific subject developed from detailed information on the daily activities of Canadians. Links to other products related to time use are also available.

    Release date: 2006-11-20

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-622-X2006003
    Description:

    The General Social Survey (GSS) is an annual survey that monitors changes and emerging trends in Canadian Society. For the fourth time in Canada, the GSS has collected national level time use data. The GSS is funded through a government initiative aimed to fill data gaps for policy research. In this paper we present the policy framework that supports the survey, and discuss the impact of that framework on the content decisions that GSS has made. Following a brief review of the major findings from the first three cycles of time use data we discuss the lessons learned and best practices in the development, collection and processing of these data in Canada. Finally, we compare the methods and content of the Canadian time use survey with the US survey.

    Release date: 2006-11-20

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-622-X2006002
    Description:

    This study provides a detailed analysis of findings based on the 2005 General Social Survey on Time Use, with some analysis of trends over time using the 1992 and 1998 time use surveys. It addresses whether older Canadians are aging well by examining the relative importance their time use patterns and health have on their overall life satisfaction.

    Like other countries in the Western world, Canada's population is aging. For more than a decade, our society has been concerned with the negative aspects of population aging such as how to care for those who are old, or how to manage pension schemes for increasing numbers of retirees. Yet with the impending retirement of a large cohort of baby boomers, the attention has been turned to more positive aspects of aging.

    The term 'aging well' now has become part of the language when thinking about older adults. Aging is seen as an ongoing process of managing the challenges associated with life transitions and with changing levels of personal resources such as health, wealth and social connections. Those who age well are able to find a balance or fit between their activities and these resources and to remain satisfied with their lives.

    For women and men, and for younger and older seniors, the ideal balance may differ, though for both, health is a key resource. In fact, one of the key theories of aging well is that those who are in good health have the potential to have more choices over their daily activities and are more likely to feel satisfied with their lives. Active engagement is seen as another key component of aging well.

    Time use patterns of older Canadians provide a useful window into understanding aging well. This study examines the main components of aging well-activity patterns and health of older Canadians. It considers several questions about aging well:1. What are the activity patterns of older Canadians? 2. What are the trends in activity patterns over time?

    These two questions provide a picture of how older adults are engaged in various activities and whether levels of activity patterns change with age:3. What are the levels of health of older Canadians?4. How do levels of health change with age?

    These two questions provide a picture of how the 'resource' of health may differ among older Canadians.

    5. What is the relationship among activity patterns, health and life satisfaction?This final question provides insight into the relative importance of health and activity level in aging well.

    Release date: 2006-07-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-622-X2006001
    Description:

    Using data from the General Social Survey on Time Use for 1992, 1998, and 2005, this article analyses the changes in average commute times between home and work. Information is broken down by province, selected census metropolitan areas and mode of transportation used.

    There is also an analysis of the factors involved in increased or decreased commute times for workers between home and work (during weekdays). The analysis shows that in addition to the distance from work, the metropolitan area of residence, whether or not errands are involved and the mode of transportation used all have a major impact on workers' commute times.

    Release date: 2006-07-12

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