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All (27) (25 of 27 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001004
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Data are collected via personal interview conducted in January, February and March after the reference year using a paper questionnaire. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the ten provinces. (The three territories are surveyed every second year starting in 2001.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, and aggregates).

    Release date: 2001-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2001003
    Description:

    The purpose of this bulletin is to review various responses to "Why are you asking about rural populations?"; to summarize and compare alternative definitions that have been used to delineate the "rural" population within the databases at Statistics Canada; and to offer alternative definitions of "rural" that would be appropriate to each reason for asking about the rural population.

    Release date: 2001-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001166
    Description:

    This study assesses two potential problems with respect to the reporting of Employment Insurance (EI) and Social Assistance (SA) benefits in the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID): (a) under-reporting of the monthly number of beneficiaries; and (b) a tendency to incorrectly report receiving benefits throughout the year, while in fact benefits may have been received only in certain months, leading to artificial spikes in the January starts and December terminations of benefit spells (seam effect). The results of the analysis show the following:

    (1) The rate of under-reporting of EI in SLID is about 15%. Although it varies by month (from 0% to 30%), it is fairly stable from year to year.

    (2) There are significant spikes in the number of January starts and December terminations of EI benefit spells. However, the spikes in January starts appear to represent a real phenomenon, rather than a seam problem. They mirror closely the pattern of establishment of new EI claims (the latter increase significantly in January as a result of the decline in employment following the Christmas peak demand). There are no corresponding statistics for EI claim terminations to assess the nature of December spikes.

    (3) The rate of under-reporting of SA in SLID is about 50%, significantly greater than for EI. The rate of under-reporting goes down to about 20% to 30%, if we assume that those who received SA, but did not report in which months they received benefits, received benefits throughout the year.

    (4) There are large spikes in the number of January starts and December terminations. As in the case of EI, the SA could reflect a real phenomenon. After all, SA starts and terminations are affected by labour market conditions, in the same way EI starts and terminations are affected. However, the SA spikes are much larger than the EI spikes, which increases the probability that, at least in part, are due to a seam effect.

    Release date: 2001-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010015855
    Description:

    The Canadian Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a monthly survey with a complex rotating panel design. After extensive studies, including the investigation of a number of alternative methods for exploiting the sample overlap to improve the quality of estimates, the LFS has chosen a composite estimation method which achieves this goal while satisfying practical constraints. In addition, for variables where there is a substantial gain in efficiency, the new time series tend to make more sense from a subject-matter perspective. This makes it easier to explain LFS estimates to users and the media. Because of the reduced variance under composite estimation, for some variables it is now possible to publish monthly estimates where only three-month moving averages were published in the past. In addition, a greater number of series can be successfully seasonally adjusted.

    Release date: 2001-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010015851
    Description:

    We consider 'telesurveys' as surveys in which the predominant or unique mode of collection is based on some means of electronic telecommunications - including both the telephone and other more advanced technological devices such as e-mail, Internet, videophone or fax. We review, briefly, the early history of telephone surveys, and, in more detail, recent developments in the areas of sample design and estimation, coverage and nonresponse and evaluation of data quality. All these methodological developments have led the telephone survey to become the major mode of collection in the sample survey field in the past quarter of a century. Other modes of advanced telecommunication are fast becoming important supplements and even competitors to the fixed line telephone and are already being used in various ways for sample surveys. We examine their potential for survey work and the possible impact of current and future technological developments of the communications industry on survey practice and their methodological implications.

    Release date: 2001-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010015858
    Description:

    The objective of this paper is to study and measure the change (from the initial to the final weight) which results from the procedure used to modify weights. A breakdown of the final weights is proposed in order to evaluate the relative impact of the nonresponse adjustment, the correction for poststratification and the interaction between these two adjustments. This measure of change is used as a tool for comparing the effectiveness of the various methods for adjusting for nonresponse, in particular the methods relying on the formation of Response Homogeneity Groups. The measure of change is examined through a simulation study, which uses data from a Statistics Canada longitudinal survey, the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics. The measure of change is also applied to data obtained from a second longitudinal survey, the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth.

    Release date: 2001-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010015857
    Description:

    This article describes and evaluates a procedure for imputing missing values for a relatively complex data structure when the data are missing at random. The imputations are obtained by fitting a sequence of regression models and drawing values from the corresponding predictive distributions. The types of regression models used are linear, logistic, Poisson, generalized logit or a mixture of these depending on the type of variable being imputed. Two additional common features in the imputation process are incorporated: restriction to a relevant subpopulation for some variables and logical bounds or constraints for the imputed values. The restrictions involve subsetting the sample individuals that satisfy certain criteria while fitting the regression models. The bounds involve drawing values from a truncated predictive distribution. The development of this method was partly motivated by the analysis of two data sets which are used as illustrations. The sequential regression procedure is applied to perform multiple imputation analysis for the two applied problems. The sampling properties of inferences from multiply imputed data sets created using the sequential regression method are evaluated through simulated data sets.

    Release date: 2001-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010015856
    Description:

    Imputation is commonly used to compensate for item nonresponse. Variance estimation after imputation has generated considerable discussion and several variance estimators have been proposed. We propose a variance estimator based on a pseudo data set used only for variance estimation. Standard complete data variance estimators applied to the pseudo data set lead to consistent estimators for linear estimators under various imputation methods, including without-replacement hot deck imputation and with-replacement hot deck imputation. The asymptotic equivalence of the proposed method and the adjusted jackknife method of Rao and Sitter (1995) is illustrated. The proposed method is directly applicable to variance estimation for two-phase sampling.

    Release date: 2001-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010019618
    Description:

    In this Issue is a column where the Editor biefly presents each paper of the current issue of Survey Methodology. As well, it sometimes contain informations on structure or management changes in the journal.

    Release date: 2001-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010015859
    Description:

    In 2001, the INSEE conducted a survey to better understand the homeless population. Since there was no survey frame to allow direct access to homeless persons, the survey principle involved sampling the services they received and questioning the individuals who used those services. Weighting the individual input to the survey proved difficult because a single individual could receive several services within the designated reference period. This article shows how it is possible to apply the weight sharing method to resolve this problem. In this type of survey, a single variable can produce several parameters of interest corresponding to populations varying with time. A set of weights corresponds to each definition of parameters. The article focuses, in particular, on "an average day" and "an average week" weight calculation. Information is also provided on the use data to be collected and the nonresponse adjustment.

    Release date: 2001-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010015853
    Description:

    The Canadian Labour Force Survey is a monthly survey of households selected according to a stratified multistage design. The sample of households is divided into six panels (rotation groups). A panel remains in the sample for six consecutive months and is then dropped from the sample. In the past, a generalized regression estimator, based only on the current month's data, has been implemented with a regression weights program. In this paper, we study regression composite estimation procedures that make use of sample information from previous periods and that can be implemented with a regression weights program.

    Release date: 2001-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010015854
    Description:

    This paper looks at a range of estimators applicable to a regularly repeated household survey with controlled overlap between successive surveys. The paper shows how the Best Linear Unbiased Estimator (BLUE) based on a fixed window of time points can be improved by applying the technique of generalised regression. This improved estimator is compared to the AK estimator of Gurney and Daly (1965) and the modified regression estimator of Singh, Kennedy, Wu and Brisebois (1997), using data from the Australian Labour Force Survey.

    Release date: 2001-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010015852
    Description:

    We consider the regression composite estimation introduced by Singh (1994, 1996; termed earlier as "modified regression composite" estimation), a version of which (suggested by Fuller 1999) has been implemented for the Canadian Labour Force Survey (CLFS) beginning in January 2000. The regression composite (rc) estimator enhances the generalized regression (gr) estimator used earlier for the CLFS and the well known Gurney-Daly ak-composite estimator in several ways.

    Release date: 2001-08-22

  • Index and guides: 12-004-X
    Description:

    Statistics: Power from Data! Was created in 2001 to assist students and teachers in getting the most from statistics. This web resource was published primarily for secondary students of Mathematics and Information Studies, although it was used by other students, teachers and the general population. It was last updated in 2011.

    Release date: 2001-04-03

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20000025538
    Description:

    Cochran (1977, p.374) proposed some ratio and regression estimators of the population mean using the Hansen and Hurwitz (1946) procedure of sub-sampling the non-respondents assuming that the population mean of the auxiliary character is known. For the case where the population mean of the auxiliary character is not known in advance, some double (two-phase) sampling ratio and regression estimators are presented in this article. The relative performances of the proposed estimators are compared with the estimator proposed by Hansen and Hurwitz (1946).

    Release date: 2001-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20000025533
    Description:

    It is common practice to estimate the design effect due to weighting by 1 plus the relative variance of the weights in the sample. This formula has been justified when the selection probabilities are uncorrelated with the variable of interest. An approximation to the design effect is provided to accommodate the situation in which correlation is present.

    Release date: 2001-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200000210502
    Description:

    In this Issue is a column where the Editor biefly presents each paper of the current issue of Survey Methodology. As well, it sometimes contain informations on structure or management changes in the journal.

    Release date: 2001-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20000025534
    Description:

    The primary goal of this research is to investigate the validity of Markov latent class analysis (MLCA) estimates of labor force classification error and to evaluate the efficacy of MLC analysis as an alternative to traditional methods for evaluating data quality.

    Release date: 2001-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20000025530
    Description:

    Reflection on professor Leslie Kish life and contributions to statistics. Some of the most significant books he wrote and statistical subjects he worked on are mentioned

    Release date: 2001-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20000025536
    Description:

    Many economic and social time series are based on sample surveys which have complex sample designs. The sample design affects the properties of the time series. In particular, the overlap of the sample from period to period affects the variability of the time series of survey estimates and the seasonally adjusted and trend estimates produced from them.

    Release date: 2001-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20000025532
    Description:

    When a survey response mechanism depends on a variable of interest measured within the same survey and observed for only part of the sample, the situation is one of nonignorable nonresponse. In such a situation, ignoring the nonresponse can generate significant bias in the estimation of a mean or of a total. To solve this problem, one option is the joint modeling of the response mechanism and the variable of interest, followed by estimation using the maximum likelihood method. The main criticism levelled at this method is that estimation using the maximum likelihood method is based on the hypothesis of error normality for the model involving the variable of interest, and this hypothesis is difficult to verify. In this paper, the author proposes an estimation method that is robust to the hypothesis of normality, so constructed that there is no need to specify the distribution of errors. The method is evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations. The author also proposes a simple method of verifying the validity of the hypothesis of error normality whenever nonresponse is not ignorable.

    Release date: 2001-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20000025535
    Description:

    The U.S. Census Bureau publishes estimates of medians for several characteristics of new houses, with a key estimate being sales price of sold houses. These estimates are calculated from data acquired from interviews of home builders by the Survey of Construction (SOC). The SOC is a multi-stage probability survey whose sample design is well suited to the modified half-sample replication (MHS) method of variance estimation.

    Release date: 2001-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20000025537
    Description:

    Standard multi-level models with random regression parameters are considered for small area estimation. We also extend the models by allowing unequal error variances or by assuming random effect models for both regression parameters and error variances.

    Release date: 2001-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20000025531
    Description:

    Information from list and area sampling frames is combined to obtain efficient estimates of population size and totals. We consider the case where the probabilities of inclusion on the list frames are heterogeneous and are modeled as a function of covariates. We adapt and modify the methodology of Huggins (1989) and Albo (1990) for modeling auxiliary variables in capture-recapture studies using a logistic regression model. We present the results from a simulation study which compares various estimators of frame size and population totals using the logistic regression approach to modeling heterogeneous inclusion probabilities.

    Release date: 2001-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20000025539
    Description:

    In this paper we will combine two applications of multilevel models. The multilevel model is suitable to analyze interviewer effects on survey data. It can also be used to analyze longitudinal - "repeated measurements" - data. We will analyze a data quality indicator of panel data that come from the Belgian Election Studies.

    Release date: 2001-02-28

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  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2001003
    Description:

    The purpose of this bulletin is to review various responses to "Why are you asking about rural populations?"; to summarize and compare alternative definitions that have been used to delineate the "rural" population within the databases at Statistics Canada; and to offer alternative definitions of "rural" that would be appropriate to each reason for asking about the rural population.

    Release date: 2001-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001166
    Description:

    This study assesses two potential problems with respect to the reporting of Employment Insurance (EI) and Social Assistance (SA) benefits in the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID): (a) under-reporting of the monthly number of beneficiaries; and (b) a tendency to incorrectly report receiving benefits throughout the year, while in fact benefits may have been received only in certain months, leading to artificial spikes in the January starts and December terminations of benefit spells (seam effect). The results of the analysis show the following:

    (1) The rate of under-reporting of EI in SLID is about 15%. Although it varies by month (from 0% to 30%), it is fairly stable from year to year.

    (2) There are significant spikes in the number of January starts and December terminations of EI benefit spells. However, the spikes in January starts appear to represent a real phenomenon, rather than a seam problem. They mirror closely the pattern of establishment of new EI claims (the latter increase significantly in January as a result of the decline in employment following the Christmas peak demand). There are no corresponding statistics for EI claim terminations to assess the nature of December spikes.

    (3) The rate of under-reporting of SA in SLID is about 50%, significantly greater than for EI. The rate of under-reporting goes down to about 20% to 30%, if we assume that those who received SA, but did not report in which months they received benefits, received benefits throughout the year.

    (4) There are large spikes in the number of January starts and December terminations. As in the case of EI, the SA could reflect a real phenomenon. After all, SA starts and terminations are affected by labour market conditions, in the same way EI starts and terminations are affected. However, the SA spikes are much larger than the EI spikes, which increases the probability that, at least in part, are due to a seam effect.

    Release date: 2001-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010015855
    Description:

    The Canadian Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a monthly survey with a complex rotating panel design. After extensive studies, including the investigation of a number of alternative methods for exploiting the sample overlap to improve the quality of estimates, the LFS has chosen a composite estimation method which achieves this goal while satisfying practical constraints. In addition, for variables where there is a substantial gain in efficiency, the new time series tend to make more sense from a subject-matter perspective. This makes it easier to explain LFS estimates to users and the media. Because of the reduced variance under composite estimation, for some variables it is now possible to publish monthly estimates where only three-month moving averages were published in the past. In addition, a greater number of series can be successfully seasonally adjusted.

    Release date: 2001-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010015851
    Description:

    We consider 'telesurveys' as surveys in which the predominant or unique mode of collection is based on some means of electronic telecommunications - including both the telephone and other more advanced technological devices such as e-mail, Internet, videophone or fax. We review, briefly, the early history of telephone surveys, and, in more detail, recent developments in the areas of sample design and estimation, coverage and nonresponse and evaluation of data quality. All these methodological developments have led the telephone survey to become the major mode of collection in the sample survey field in the past quarter of a century. Other modes of advanced telecommunication are fast becoming important supplements and even competitors to the fixed line telephone and are already being used in various ways for sample surveys. We examine their potential for survey work and the possible impact of current and future technological developments of the communications industry on survey practice and their methodological implications.

    Release date: 2001-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010015858
    Description:

    The objective of this paper is to study and measure the change (from the initial to the final weight) which results from the procedure used to modify weights. A breakdown of the final weights is proposed in order to evaluate the relative impact of the nonresponse adjustment, the correction for poststratification and the interaction between these two adjustments. This measure of change is used as a tool for comparing the effectiveness of the various methods for adjusting for nonresponse, in particular the methods relying on the formation of Response Homogeneity Groups. The measure of change is examined through a simulation study, which uses data from a Statistics Canada longitudinal survey, the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics. The measure of change is also applied to data obtained from a second longitudinal survey, the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth.

    Release date: 2001-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010015857
    Description:

    This article describes and evaluates a procedure for imputing missing values for a relatively complex data structure when the data are missing at random. The imputations are obtained by fitting a sequence of regression models and drawing values from the corresponding predictive distributions. The types of regression models used are linear, logistic, Poisson, generalized logit or a mixture of these depending on the type of variable being imputed. Two additional common features in the imputation process are incorporated: restriction to a relevant subpopulation for some variables and logical bounds or constraints for the imputed values. The restrictions involve subsetting the sample individuals that satisfy certain criteria while fitting the regression models. The bounds involve drawing values from a truncated predictive distribution. The development of this method was partly motivated by the analysis of two data sets which are used as illustrations. The sequential regression procedure is applied to perform multiple imputation analysis for the two applied problems. The sampling properties of inferences from multiply imputed data sets created using the sequential regression method are evaluated through simulated data sets.

    Release date: 2001-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010015856
    Description:

    Imputation is commonly used to compensate for item nonresponse. Variance estimation after imputation has generated considerable discussion and several variance estimators have been proposed. We propose a variance estimator based on a pseudo data set used only for variance estimation. Standard complete data variance estimators applied to the pseudo data set lead to consistent estimators for linear estimators under various imputation methods, including without-replacement hot deck imputation and with-replacement hot deck imputation. The asymptotic equivalence of the proposed method and the adjusted jackknife method of Rao and Sitter (1995) is illustrated. The proposed method is directly applicable to variance estimation for two-phase sampling.

    Release date: 2001-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010019618
    Description:

    In this Issue is a column where the Editor biefly presents each paper of the current issue of Survey Methodology. As well, it sometimes contain informations on structure or management changes in the journal.

    Release date: 2001-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010015859
    Description:

    In 2001, the INSEE conducted a survey to better understand the homeless population. Since there was no survey frame to allow direct access to homeless persons, the survey principle involved sampling the services they received and questioning the individuals who used those services. Weighting the individual input to the survey proved difficult because a single individual could receive several services within the designated reference period. This article shows how it is possible to apply the weight sharing method to resolve this problem. In this type of survey, a single variable can produce several parameters of interest corresponding to populations varying with time. A set of weights corresponds to each definition of parameters. The article focuses, in particular, on "an average day" and "an average week" weight calculation. Information is also provided on the use data to be collected and the nonresponse adjustment.

    Release date: 2001-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010015853
    Description:

    The Canadian Labour Force Survey is a monthly survey of households selected according to a stratified multistage design. The sample of households is divided into six panels (rotation groups). A panel remains in the sample for six consecutive months and is then dropped from the sample. In the past, a generalized regression estimator, based only on the current month's data, has been implemented with a regression weights program. In this paper, we study regression composite estimation procedures that make use of sample information from previous periods and that can be implemented with a regression weights program.

    Release date: 2001-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010015854
    Description:

    This paper looks at a range of estimators applicable to a regularly repeated household survey with controlled overlap between successive surveys. The paper shows how the Best Linear Unbiased Estimator (BLUE) based on a fixed window of time points can be improved by applying the technique of generalised regression. This improved estimator is compared to the AK estimator of Gurney and Daly (1965) and the modified regression estimator of Singh, Kennedy, Wu and Brisebois (1997), using data from the Australian Labour Force Survey.

    Release date: 2001-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010015852
    Description:

    We consider the regression composite estimation introduced by Singh (1994, 1996; termed earlier as "modified regression composite" estimation), a version of which (suggested by Fuller 1999) has been implemented for the Canadian Labour Force Survey (CLFS) beginning in January 2000. The regression composite (rc) estimator enhances the generalized regression (gr) estimator used earlier for the CLFS and the well known Gurney-Daly ak-composite estimator in several ways.

    Release date: 2001-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20000025538
    Description:

    Cochran (1977, p.374) proposed some ratio and regression estimators of the population mean using the Hansen and Hurwitz (1946) procedure of sub-sampling the non-respondents assuming that the population mean of the auxiliary character is known. For the case where the population mean of the auxiliary character is not known in advance, some double (two-phase) sampling ratio and regression estimators are presented in this article. The relative performances of the proposed estimators are compared with the estimator proposed by Hansen and Hurwitz (1946).

    Release date: 2001-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20000025533
    Description:

    It is common practice to estimate the design effect due to weighting by 1 plus the relative variance of the weights in the sample. This formula has been justified when the selection probabilities are uncorrelated with the variable of interest. An approximation to the design effect is provided to accommodate the situation in which correlation is present.

    Release date: 2001-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200000210502
    Description:

    In this Issue is a column where the Editor biefly presents each paper of the current issue of Survey Methodology. As well, it sometimes contain informations on structure or management changes in the journal.

    Release date: 2001-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20000025534
    Description:

    The primary goal of this research is to investigate the validity of Markov latent class analysis (MLCA) estimates of labor force classification error and to evaluate the efficacy of MLC analysis as an alternative to traditional methods for evaluating data quality.

    Release date: 2001-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20000025530
    Description:

    Reflection on professor Leslie Kish life and contributions to statistics. Some of the most significant books he wrote and statistical subjects he worked on are mentioned

    Release date: 2001-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20000025536
    Description:

    Many economic and social time series are based on sample surveys which have complex sample designs. The sample design affects the properties of the time series. In particular, the overlap of the sample from period to period affects the variability of the time series of survey estimates and the seasonally adjusted and trend estimates produced from them.

    Release date: 2001-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20000025532
    Description:

    When a survey response mechanism depends on a variable of interest measured within the same survey and observed for only part of the sample, the situation is one of nonignorable nonresponse. In such a situation, ignoring the nonresponse can generate significant bias in the estimation of a mean or of a total. To solve this problem, one option is the joint modeling of the response mechanism and the variable of interest, followed by estimation using the maximum likelihood method. The main criticism levelled at this method is that estimation using the maximum likelihood method is based on the hypothesis of error normality for the model involving the variable of interest, and this hypothesis is difficult to verify. In this paper, the author proposes an estimation method that is robust to the hypothesis of normality, so constructed that there is no need to specify the distribution of errors. The method is evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations. The author also proposes a simple method of verifying the validity of the hypothesis of error normality whenever nonresponse is not ignorable.

    Release date: 2001-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20000025535
    Description:

    The U.S. Census Bureau publishes estimates of medians for several characteristics of new houses, with a key estimate being sales price of sold houses. These estimates are calculated from data acquired from interviews of home builders by the Survey of Construction (SOC). The SOC is a multi-stage probability survey whose sample design is well suited to the modified half-sample replication (MHS) method of variance estimation.

    Release date: 2001-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20000025537
    Description:

    Standard multi-level models with random regression parameters are considered for small area estimation. We also extend the models by allowing unequal error variances or by assuming random effect models for both regression parameters and error variances.

    Release date: 2001-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20000025531
    Description:

    Information from list and area sampling frames is combined to obtain efficient estimates of population size and totals. We consider the case where the probabilities of inclusion on the list frames are heterogeneous and are modeled as a function of covariates. We adapt and modify the methodology of Huggins (1989) and Albo (1990) for modeling auxiliary variables in capture-recapture studies using a logistic regression model. We present the results from a simulation study which compares various estimators of frame size and population totals using the logistic regression approach to modeling heterogeneous inclusion probabilities.

    Release date: 2001-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20000025539
    Description:

    In this paper we will combine two applications of multilevel models. The multilevel model is suitable to analyze interviewer effects on survey data. It can also be used to analyze longitudinal - "repeated measurements" - data. We will analyze a data quality indicator of panel data that come from the Belgian Election Studies.

    Release date: 2001-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20000025540
    Description:

    Screen design and questionnaire design affect the interviewer behavior in a CAI environment. Previous research has shown that interviewers can work more properly and efficiently if suitable functions and features are incorporated in the CAI instrument. Usability experiments with the household roster of two large government surveys have shown that using grids and tables is an important feature to facilitate the interviewer's performance.

    Release date: 2001-02-28

Reference (3)

Reference (3) (3 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001004
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Data are collected via personal interview conducted in January, February and March after the reference year using a paper questionnaire. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the ten provinces. (The three territories are surveyed every second year starting in 2001.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, and aggregates).

    Release date: 2001-12-12

  • Index and guides: 12-004-X
    Description:

    Statistics: Power from Data! Was created in 2001 to assist students and teachers in getting the most from statistics. This web resource was published primarily for secondary students of Mathematics and Information Studies, although it was used by other students, teachers and the general population. It was last updated in 2011.

    Release date: 2001-04-03

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2001002
    Description:

    The Survey of Financial Security (SFS) will provide information on the net worth of Canadians. In order to do this, information was collected - in May and June 1999 - on the value of the assets and debts of each of the families or unattached individuals in the sample. The value of one particular asset is not easy to determine, or to estimate. That is the present value of the amount people have accrued in their employer pension plan. These plans are often called registered pension plans (RPP), as they must be registered with Canada Customs and Revenue Agency. Although some RPP members receive estimates of the value of their accrued benefit, in most cases plan members would not know this amount. However, it is likely to be one of the largest assets for many family units. And, as the baby boomers approach retirement, information on their pension accumulations is much needed to better understand their financial readiness for this transition.

    The intent of this paper is to: present, for discussion, a methodology for estimating the present value of employer pension plan benefits for the Survey of Financial Security; and to seek feedback on the proposed methodology. This document proposes a methodology for estimating the value of employer pension plan benefits for the following groups:a) persons who belonged to an RPP at the time of the survey (referred to as current plan members); b) persons who had previously belonged to an RPP and either left the money in the plan or transferred it to a new plan; c) persons who are receiving RPP benefits.

    Release date: 2001-02-07

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