Statistics by subject – Statistical methods

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Survey or statistical program

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Survey or statistical program

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Survey or statistical program

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Survey or statistical program

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (86)

All (86) (25 of 86 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2007047
    Description:

    This paper examines the effect of aberrant observations in the Capital, Labour, Energy, Materials and Services (KLEMS) database and a method for dealing with them. The level of disaggregation, data construction and economic shocks all potentially lead to aberrant observations that can influence estimates and inference if care is not exercised. Commonly applied pre-tests, such as the augmented Dickey-Fuller and the Kwaitkowski, Phillips, Schmidt and Shin tests, need to be used with caution in this environment because they are sensitive to unusual data points. Moreover, widely known methods for generating statistical estimates, such as Ordinary Least Squares, may not work well when confronted with aberrant observations. To address this, a robust method for estimating statistical relationships is illustrated.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S200700010363
    Description:

    This overview describes the sampling strategy used to meet the collection and estimation requirements of the Canadian Health Measures Survey.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S200700010362
    Description:

    This article summarizes the design, methods and results emerging from the Canadian Health Measures Survey pre-test, which took place from October through December 2004 in Calgary, Alberta.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S200700010361
    Description:

    This article summarizes the background, history and rationale for the Canadian Health Measures Survey, and provides an overview of the objectives, methods and analysis plans.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S200700010366
    Description:

    This article describes some of the logistical and operational requirement and procedures employed to perform the clinic component of the Canadian Health Measures Survey.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S200700010364
    Description:

    This article describes how the Canadian Health Measures Survey has addressed the ethical, legal and social issues (ELSI) arising from the survey. The development of appropriate procedures and the rationale behind them are discussed in detail for some specific ELSI.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2007007
    Description:

    The Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID), introduced in the 1993 reference year, is a longitudinal panel survey of individuals. The purpose of the survey is to measure changes in the economic well-being of individuals and the factors that influence these changes. SLID's sample is divided into two overlapping panels, each six years in length. Longitudinal surveys like SLID are complex due to the dynamic nature of the sample, which in turn is due to the ever-changing composition of households and families over the years. For each reference year, SLID produces two sets of weights: one is representative of the initial population (the longitudinal weights), while the other is representative of the current population (the cross-sectional weights). Since 2002, SLID has been producing a third set of weights which combines two panels that overlap to form a new longitudinal sample. The new weights are referred to as combined longitudinal weights.

    For the production of the cross-sectional weights, SLID combines two independent samples and assigns a probability of selection to individuals who joined the sample after the panel was selected. Like cross-sectional weights, longitudinal weights are adjusted for non-response and influential values. In addition, the sample is adjusted to make it representative of the target population. The purpose of this document is to describe SLID's methodology for the longitudinal and cross-sectional weights, as well as to present problems that have been encountered, and solutions that have been proposed. For the purpose of illustration, results for the 2003 reference year are used. The methodology used to produce the combined longitudinal weights will not be presented in this document as there is a complete description in Naud (2004).

    Release date: 2007-10-18

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20070019853
    Description:

    Two-phase sampling is a useful design when the auxiliary variables are unavailable in advance. Variance estimation under this design, however, is complicated particularly when sampling fractions are high. This article addresses a simple bootstrap method for two-phase simple random sampling without replacement at each phase with high sampling fractions. It works for the estimation of distribution functions and quantiles since no rescaling is performed. The method can be extended to stratified two-phase sampling by independently repeating the proposed procedure in different strata. Variance estimation of some conventional estimators, such as the ratio and regression estimators, is studied for illustration. A simulation study is conducted to compare the proposed method with existing variance estimators for estimating distribution functions and quantiles.

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20070019920
    Description:

    In this Issue is a column where the Editor biefly presents each paper of the current issue of Survey Methodology. As well, it sometimes contain informations on structure or management changes in the journal.

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20070019851
    Description:

    To model economic depreciation, a database is used that contains information on assets discarded by companies. The acquisition and resale prices are known along with the length of use of these assets. However, the assets for which prices are known are only those that were involved in a transaction. While an asset depreciates on a continuous basis during its service life, the value of the asset is only known when there has been a transaction. This article proposes an ex post weighting to offset the effect of source of error in building econometric models.

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20070019856
    Description:

    The concept of 'nearest proportional to size sampling designs' originated by Gabler (1987) is used to obtain an optimal controlled sampling design, ensuring zero selection probabilities to non-preferred samples. Variance estimation for the proposed optimal controlled sampling design using the Yates-Grundy form of the Horvitz-Thompson estimator is discussed. The true sampling variance of the proposed procedure is compared with that of the existing optimal controlled and uncontrolled high entropy selection procedures. The utility of the proposed procedure is demonstrated with the help of examples.

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20070019852
    Description:

    A common class of survey designs involves selecting all people within selected households. Generalized regression estimators can be calculated at either the person or household level. Implementing the estimator at the household level has the convenience of equal estimation weights for people within households. In this article the two approaches are compared theoretically and empirically for the case of simple random sampling of households and selection of all persons in each selected household. We find that the household level approach is theoretically more efficient in large samples and any empirical inefficiency in small samples is limited.

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20070019849
    Description:

    In sample surveys where units have unequal probabilities of inclusion in the sample, associations between the probability of inclusion and the statistic of interest can induce bias. Weights equal to the inverse of the probability of inclusion are often used to counteract this bias. Highly disproportional sample designs have large weights, which can introduce undesirable variability in statistics such as the population mean estimator or population regression estimator. Weight trimming reduces large weights to a fixed cutpoint value and adjusts weights below this value to maintain the untrimmed weight sum, reducing variability at the cost of introducing some bias. Most standard approaches are ad-hoc in that they do not use the data to optimize bias-variance tradeoffs. Approaches described in the literature that are data-driven are a little more efficient than fully-weighted estimators. This paper develops Bayesian methods for weight trimming of linear and generalized linear regression estimators in unequal probability-of-inclusion designs. An application to estimate injury risk of children rear-seated in compact extended-cab pickup trucks using the Partners for Child Passenger Safety surveillance survey is considered.

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20070019850
    Description:

    Auxiliary information is often used to improve the precision of survey estimators of finite population means and totals through ratio or linear regression estimation techniques. Resulting estimators have good theoretical and practical properties, including invariance, calibration and design consistency. However, it is not always clear that ratio or linear models are good approximations to the true relationship between the auxiliary variables and the variable of interest in the survey, resulting in efficiency loss when the model is not appropriate. In this article, we explain how regression estimation can be extended to incorporate semiparametric regression models, in both simple and more complicated designs. While maintaining the good theoretical and practical properties of the linear models, semiparametric models are better able to capture complicated relationships between variables. This often results in substantial gains in efficiency. The applicability of the approach for complex designs using multiple types of auxiliary variables will be illustrated by estimating several acidification-related characteristics for a survey of lakes in the Northeastern US.

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20070019848
    Description:

    We investigate some modifications of the classical single-spell Cox model in order to handle multiple spells from the same individual when the data are collected in a longitudinal survey based on a complex sample design. One modification is the use of a design-based approach for the estimation of the model coefficients and their variances; in the variance estimation each individual is treated as a cluster of spells, bringing an extra stage of clustering into the survey design. Other modifications to the model allow a flexible specification of the baseline hazard to account for possibly differential dependence of hazard on the order and duration of successive spells, and also allow for differential effects of the covariates on the spells of different orders. These approaches are illustrated using data from the Canadian Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20070019847
    Description:

    We investigate the impact of cluster sampling on standard errors in the analysis of longitudinal survey data. We consider a widely used class of regression models for longitudinal data and a standard class of point estimators of a generalized least squares type. We argue theoretically that the impact of ignoring clustering in standard error estimation will tend to increase with the number of waves in the analysis, under some patterns of clustering which are realistic for many social surveys. The implication is that it is, in general, at least as important to allow for clustering in standard errors for longitudinal analyses as for cross-sectional analyses. We illustrate this theoretical argument with empirical evidence from a regression analysis of longitudinal data on gender role attitudes from the British Household Panel Survey. We also compare two approaches to variance estimation in the analysis of longitudinal survey data: a survey sampling approach based upon linearization and a multilevel modelling approach. We conclude that the impact of clustering can be seriously underestimated if it is simply handled by including an additive random effect to represent the clustering in a multilevel model.

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20070019854
    Description:

    We derive an estimator of the mean squared error (MSE) of the empirical Bayes and composite estimator of the local-area mean in the standard small-area setting. The MSE estimator is a composition of the established estimator based on the conditional expectation of the random deviation associated with the area and a naïve estimator of the design-based MSE. Its performance is assessed by simulations. Variants of this MSE estimator are explored and some extensions outlined.

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20070019855
    Description:

    In surveys under cluster sampling, nonresponse on a variable is often dependent on a cluster level random effect and, hence, is nonignorable. Estimators of the population mean obtained by mean imputation or reweighting under the ignorable nonresponse assumption are then biased. We propose an unbiased estimator of the population mean by imputing or reweighting within each sampled cluster or a group of sampled clusters sharing some common feature. Some simulation results are presented to study the performance of the proposed estimator.

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Index and guides: 12-594-X
    Description:

    This Summary Report provides an overview of the findings of a Quality Assurance Review that was conducted for nine key statistical programs during the period September 2006 to February 2007. The review was commissioned by Statistics Canada's Policy Committee in order to assess the soundness of quality assurance processes for these nine programs and to propose improvements where needed. The Summary Report describes the principal themes that recur frequently throughout these programs, as well as providing guidance for future reviews of this type.

    Release date: 2007-06-20

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2007001
    Description:

    The Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) is a longitudinal survey which collects information related to the standard of living of individuals and their families. By interviewing the same people over a period of six years, changes and the causes of these changes can be monitored.

    A preliminary interview of background information is collected for all respondents aged 16 and over, who enter the SLID sample. Preliminary interviews are conducted for new household members during their first labour and income interview after they join the household. A labour and income interview is collected each year for all respondents 16 years of age and over.

    The purpose of this document is to present the questions, possible responses and question flows for the 2006 preliminary, labour and income questionnaire (for the 2005 reference year).

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2007002
    Description:

    The Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) conducts an annual labour and income interview in January. The data are collected using computer-assisted interviewing; thus there are no paper questionnaires required for data collection. The questions, responses and interview flow for labour and income are documented in another SLID research paper. This document presents the information for the 2006 entry and exit portions of the labour and income interview (for the 2005 reference year).

    The entry exit component consists of five separate modules. The entry module is the first set of data collected. It is information collected to update the place of residence, housing conditions and expenses, as well as the household composition. For each person identified in entry, the demographics module collects (or updates) the person's name, date of birth, sex and marital status. Then the relationships module identifies (or updates) the relationship between each respondent and every other household member. The exit module includes questions on who to contact for the next interview and the names, phone numbers and addresses of two contacts to be used only if future tracing of respondents is required. An overview of the tracing component is also included in this document.

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2007003
    Description:

    The Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) is a longitudinal survey initiated in 1993. The survey was designed to measure changes in the economic well-being of Canadians as well as the factors affecting these changes.

    Sample surveys are subject to errors. As with all surveys conducted at Statistics Canada, considerable time and effort is taken to control such errors at every stage of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics. Nonetheless errors do occur. It is the policy at Statistics Canada to furnish users with measures of data quality so that the user is able to interpret the data properly. This report summarizes a set of quality measures that has been produced in an attempt to describe the overall quality of SLID data. Among the measures included in the report are sample composition and attrition rates, sampling errors, coverage errors in the form of slippage rates, response rates, tax permission and tax linkage rates, and imputation rates.

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710213182
    Description:

    Even though the retirement wave will have significant labour market consequences over the next 20 years, no regular statistics are produced on retirement or the retired. Part of the problem stems from lack of clear definitions. For some, retirement means complete withdrawal from the labour force while for others it entails part- or even full-time work. The article examines the challenges faced by statistical organizations in measuring retirement and offers several recommendations to inform a discussion for arriving at international standards.

    Release date: 2007-03-20

  • Technical products: 11-522-X2005001
    Description:

    Since 1984, an annual international symposium on methodological issues has been sponsored by Statistics Canada. Proceedings have been available since 1987. Symposium 2005 was the twenty second in Statistics Canada's series of international symposia on methodological issues. Each year the symposium focuses on a particular them. In 2005 the theme was: "Methodological challenges for future information needs".

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20050019468
    Description:

    At the time of recruitment, the participants in a longitudinal survey are chosen to be representative of a population. As time goes on, typically some of the participants will drop out, and dropout may be informative in the sense of depending on the response variables of interest. However, even if dropout is minimal, the participants who continue to the second and third waves of a longitudinal survey may differ from those they supposedly represent in subtle ways. It is clearly important to take such possibilities into account when designing and analyzing longitudinal survey data before and after an intervention.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

Your search for "" found no results in this section of the site.

You may try:

Analysis (18)

Analysis (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2007047
    Description:

    This paper examines the effect of aberrant observations in the Capital, Labour, Energy, Materials and Services (KLEMS) database and a method for dealing with them. The level of disaggregation, data construction and economic shocks all potentially lead to aberrant observations that can influence estimates and inference if care is not exercised. Commonly applied pre-tests, such as the augmented Dickey-Fuller and the Kwaitkowski, Phillips, Schmidt and Shin tests, need to be used with caution in this environment because they are sensitive to unusual data points. Moreover, widely known methods for generating statistical estimates, such as Ordinary Least Squares, may not work well when confronted with aberrant observations. To address this, a robust method for estimating statistical relationships is illustrated.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S200700010363
    Description:

    This overview describes the sampling strategy used to meet the collection and estimation requirements of the Canadian Health Measures Survey.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S200700010362
    Description:

    This article summarizes the design, methods and results emerging from the Canadian Health Measures Survey pre-test, which took place from October through December 2004 in Calgary, Alberta.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S200700010361
    Description:

    This article summarizes the background, history and rationale for the Canadian Health Measures Survey, and provides an overview of the objectives, methods and analysis plans.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S200700010366
    Description:

    This article describes some of the logistical and operational requirement and procedures employed to perform the clinic component of the Canadian Health Measures Survey.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S200700010364
    Description:

    This article describes how the Canadian Health Measures Survey has addressed the ethical, legal and social issues (ELSI) arising from the survey. The development of appropriate procedures and the rationale behind them are discussed in detail for some specific ELSI.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20070019853
    Description:

    Two-phase sampling is a useful design when the auxiliary variables are unavailable in advance. Variance estimation under this design, however, is complicated particularly when sampling fractions are high. This article addresses a simple bootstrap method for two-phase simple random sampling without replacement at each phase with high sampling fractions. It works for the estimation of distribution functions and quantiles since no rescaling is performed. The method can be extended to stratified two-phase sampling by independently repeating the proposed procedure in different strata. Variance estimation of some conventional estimators, such as the ratio and regression estimators, is studied for illustration. A simulation study is conducted to compare the proposed method with existing variance estimators for estimating distribution functions and quantiles.

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20070019920
    Description:

    In this Issue is a column where the Editor biefly presents each paper of the current issue of Survey Methodology. As well, it sometimes contain informations on structure or management changes in the journal.

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20070019851
    Description:

    To model economic depreciation, a database is used that contains information on assets discarded by companies. The acquisition and resale prices are known along with the length of use of these assets. However, the assets for which prices are known are only those that were involved in a transaction. While an asset depreciates on a continuous basis during its service life, the value of the asset is only known when there has been a transaction. This article proposes an ex post weighting to offset the effect of source of error in building econometric models.

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20070019856
    Description:

    The concept of 'nearest proportional to size sampling designs' originated by Gabler (1987) is used to obtain an optimal controlled sampling design, ensuring zero selection probabilities to non-preferred samples. Variance estimation for the proposed optimal controlled sampling design using the Yates-Grundy form of the Horvitz-Thompson estimator is discussed. The true sampling variance of the proposed procedure is compared with that of the existing optimal controlled and uncontrolled high entropy selection procedures. The utility of the proposed procedure is demonstrated with the help of examples.

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20070019852
    Description:

    A common class of survey designs involves selecting all people within selected households. Generalized regression estimators can be calculated at either the person or household level. Implementing the estimator at the household level has the convenience of equal estimation weights for people within households. In this article the two approaches are compared theoretically and empirically for the case of simple random sampling of households and selection of all persons in each selected household. We find that the household level approach is theoretically more efficient in large samples and any empirical inefficiency in small samples is limited.

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20070019849
    Description:

    In sample surveys where units have unequal probabilities of inclusion in the sample, associations between the probability of inclusion and the statistic of interest can induce bias. Weights equal to the inverse of the probability of inclusion are often used to counteract this bias. Highly disproportional sample designs have large weights, which can introduce undesirable variability in statistics such as the population mean estimator or population regression estimator. Weight trimming reduces large weights to a fixed cutpoint value and adjusts weights below this value to maintain the untrimmed weight sum, reducing variability at the cost of introducing some bias. Most standard approaches are ad-hoc in that they do not use the data to optimize bias-variance tradeoffs. Approaches described in the literature that are data-driven are a little more efficient than fully-weighted estimators. This paper develops Bayesian methods for weight trimming of linear and generalized linear regression estimators in unequal probability-of-inclusion designs. An application to estimate injury risk of children rear-seated in compact extended-cab pickup trucks using the Partners for Child Passenger Safety surveillance survey is considered.

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20070019850
    Description:

    Auxiliary information is often used to improve the precision of survey estimators of finite population means and totals through ratio or linear regression estimation techniques. Resulting estimators have good theoretical and practical properties, including invariance, calibration and design consistency. However, it is not always clear that ratio or linear models are good approximations to the true relationship between the auxiliary variables and the variable of interest in the survey, resulting in efficiency loss when the model is not appropriate. In this article, we explain how regression estimation can be extended to incorporate semiparametric regression models, in both simple and more complicated designs. While maintaining the good theoretical and practical properties of the linear models, semiparametric models are better able to capture complicated relationships between variables. This often results in substantial gains in efficiency. The applicability of the approach for complex designs using multiple types of auxiliary variables will be illustrated by estimating several acidification-related characteristics for a survey of lakes in the Northeastern US.

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20070019848
    Description:

    We investigate some modifications of the classical single-spell Cox model in order to handle multiple spells from the same individual when the data are collected in a longitudinal survey based on a complex sample design. One modification is the use of a design-based approach for the estimation of the model coefficients and their variances; in the variance estimation each individual is treated as a cluster of spells, bringing an extra stage of clustering into the survey design. Other modifications to the model allow a flexible specification of the baseline hazard to account for possibly differential dependence of hazard on the order and duration of successive spells, and also allow for differential effects of the covariates on the spells of different orders. These approaches are illustrated using data from the Canadian Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20070019847
    Description:

    We investigate the impact of cluster sampling on standard errors in the analysis of longitudinal survey data. We consider a widely used class of regression models for longitudinal data and a standard class of point estimators of a generalized least squares type. We argue theoretically that the impact of ignoring clustering in standard error estimation will tend to increase with the number of waves in the analysis, under some patterns of clustering which are realistic for many social surveys. The implication is that it is, in general, at least as important to allow for clustering in standard errors for longitudinal analyses as for cross-sectional analyses. We illustrate this theoretical argument with empirical evidence from a regression analysis of longitudinal data on gender role attitudes from the British Household Panel Survey. We also compare two approaches to variance estimation in the analysis of longitudinal survey data: a survey sampling approach based upon linearization and a multilevel modelling approach. We conclude that the impact of clustering can be seriously underestimated if it is simply handled by including an additive random effect to represent the clustering in a multilevel model.

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20070019854
    Description:

    We derive an estimator of the mean squared error (MSE) of the empirical Bayes and composite estimator of the local-area mean in the standard small-area setting. The MSE estimator is a composition of the established estimator based on the conditional expectation of the random deviation associated with the area and a naïve estimator of the design-based MSE. Its performance is assessed by simulations. Variants of this MSE estimator are explored and some extensions outlined.

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20070019855
    Description:

    In surveys under cluster sampling, nonresponse on a variable is often dependent on a cluster level random effect and, hence, is nonignorable. Estimators of the population mean obtained by mean imputation or reweighting under the ignorable nonresponse assumption are then biased. We propose an unbiased estimator of the population mean by imputing or reweighting within each sampled cluster or a group of sampled clusters sharing some common feature. Some simulation results are presented to study the performance of the proposed estimator.

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710213182
    Description:

    Even though the retirement wave will have significant labour market consequences over the next 20 years, no regular statistics are produced on retirement or the retired. Part of the problem stems from lack of clear definitions. For some, retirement means complete withdrawal from the labour force while for others it entails part- or even full-time work. The article examines the challenges faced by statistical organizations in measuring retirement and offers several recommendations to inform a discussion for arriving at international standards.

    Release date: 2007-03-20

Reference (68)

Reference (68) (25 of 68 results)

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2007007
    Description:

    The Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID), introduced in the 1993 reference year, is a longitudinal panel survey of individuals. The purpose of the survey is to measure changes in the economic well-being of individuals and the factors that influence these changes. SLID's sample is divided into two overlapping panels, each six years in length. Longitudinal surveys like SLID are complex due to the dynamic nature of the sample, which in turn is due to the ever-changing composition of households and families over the years. For each reference year, SLID produces two sets of weights: one is representative of the initial population (the longitudinal weights), while the other is representative of the current population (the cross-sectional weights). Since 2002, SLID has been producing a third set of weights which combines two panels that overlap to form a new longitudinal sample. The new weights are referred to as combined longitudinal weights.

    For the production of the cross-sectional weights, SLID combines two independent samples and assigns a probability of selection to individuals who joined the sample after the panel was selected. Like cross-sectional weights, longitudinal weights are adjusted for non-response and influential values. In addition, the sample is adjusted to make it representative of the target population. The purpose of this document is to describe SLID's methodology for the longitudinal and cross-sectional weights, as well as to present problems that have been encountered, and solutions that have been proposed. For the purpose of illustration, results for the 2003 reference year are used. The methodology used to produce the combined longitudinal weights will not be presented in this document as there is a complete description in Naud (2004).

    Release date: 2007-10-18

  • Index and guides: 12-594-X
    Description:

    This Summary Report provides an overview of the findings of a Quality Assurance Review that was conducted for nine key statistical programs during the period September 2006 to February 2007. The review was commissioned by Statistics Canada's Policy Committee in order to assess the soundness of quality assurance processes for these nine programs and to propose improvements where needed. The Summary Report describes the principal themes that recur frequently throughout these programs, as well as providing guidance for future reviews of this type.

    Release date: 2007-06-20

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2007001
    Description:

    The Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) is a longitudinal survey which collects information related to the standard of living of individuals and their families. By interviewing the same people over a period of six years, changes and the causes of these changes can be monitored.

    A preliminary interview of background information is collected for all respondents aged 16 and over, who enter the SLID sample. Preliminary interviews are conducted for new household members during their first labour and income interview after they join the household. A labour and income interview is collected each year for all respondents 16 years of age and over.

    The purpose of this document is to present the questions, possible responses and question flows for the 2006 preliminary, labour and income questionnaire (for the 2005 reference year).

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2007002
    Description:

    The Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) conducts an annual labour and income interview in January. The data are collected using computer-assisted interviewing; thus there are no paper questionnaires required for data collection. The questions, responses and interview flow for labour and income are documented in another SLID research paper. This document presents the information for the 2006 entry and exit portions of the labour and income interview (for the 2005 reference year).

    The entry exit component consists of five separate modules. The entry module is the first set of data collected. It is information collected to update the place of residence, housing conditions and expenses, as well as the household composition. For each person identified in entry, the demographics module collects (or updates) the person's name, date of birth, sex and marital status. Then the relationships module identifies (or updates) the relationship between each respondent and every other household member. The exit module includes questions on who to contact for the next interview and the names, phone numbers and addresses of two contacts to be used only if future tracing of respondents is required. An overview of the tracing component is also included in this document.

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2007003
    Description:

    The Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) is a longitudinal survey initiated in 1993. The survey was designed to measure changes in the economic well-being of Canadians as well as the factors affecting these changes.

    Sample surveys are subject to errors. As with all surveys conducted at Statistics Canada, considerable time and effort is taken to control such errors at every stage of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics. Nonetheless errors do occur. It is the policy at Statistics Canada to furnish users with measures of data quality so that the user is able to interpret the data properly. This report summarizes a set of quality measures that has been produced in an attempt to describe the overall quality of SLID data. Among the measures included in the report are sample composition and attrition rates, sampling errors, coverage errors in the form of slippage rates, response rates, tax permission and tax linkage rates, and imputation rates.

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Technical products: 11-522-X2005001
    Description:

    Since 1984, an annual international symposium on methodological issues has been sponsored by Statistics Canada. Proceedings have been available since 1987. Symposium 2005 was the twenty second in Statistics Canada's series of international symposia on methodological issues. Each year the symposium focuses on a particular them. In 2005 the theme was: "Methodological challenges for future information needs".

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20050019468
    Description:

    At the time of recruitment, the participants in a longitudinal survey are chosen to be representative of a population. As time goes on, typically some of the participants will drop out, and dropout may be informative in the sense of depending on the response variables of interest. However, even if dropout is minimal, the participants who continue to the second and third waves of a longitudinal survey may differ from those they supposedly represent in subtle ways. It is clearly important to take such possibilities into account when designing and analyzing longitudinal survey data before and after an intervention.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20050019439
    Description:

    The data collection process is becoming increasingly more challenging due to a number of factors, including: ageing of the farm population, decreasing number of farmers, increasing farm sizes, financial crises arising from BSE (mad cow disease) and the avian influenza, and from extreme climatic impacts causing drought conditions in some areas and flooding in others. There also seems to be rising levels of concern about privacy and confidentiality. This paper will describe how agriculture is an industry in transition, how difficulties faced by the agricultural sector impact data collection issues, and how our subsequent responses and actions are addressing these challenging issues.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20050019435
    Description:

    Data swapping introduces noise in a dataset to improve the protection of statistical confidentiality. We demonstrate in this article that this technique introduces a bias in the estimates.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20050019464
    Description:

    The Quarterly Services Survey has maintained comprehensive response data since the survey's inception. In analyzing the data, we concentrate on three fundamental features of response: rate, timeliness, and quality. We examine these three components across multiple dimensions. We observe the effect associated with NAICS classification, company size and response mode.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20050019441
    Description:

    The Survey of Principals collects information on various topics related to the work of school principals. This article presents a brief description of this survey 's challenges and provides examples to illustrate the problems observed. The steps taken to resolve the challenges are described, and their impact on data quality is analyzed.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20050019433
    Description:

    Spatially explicit data pose a series of opportunities and challenges for all the actors involved in providing data for long-term preservation and secondary analysis - the data producer, the data archive, and the data user.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20050019600
    Description:

    Closing remarks

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20050019447
    Description:

    To understand the selection biases in model estimation when using longitudinal survey panel microdata, we consider a structural model composed of three equations for non-attrition/response, employment and wages. The three equations are freely correlated.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20050019461
    Description:

    We propose a generalization of the usual coefficient of variation (CV) to address some of the known problems when used in measuring quality of estimates. Some of the problems associated with CV include interpretation when the estimate is near zero, and the inconsistency in the interpretation about precision when computed for different one-to-one monotonic transformations.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20050019436
    Description:

    Regardless of the specifics of any given metadata scheme, there are common metadata constructs used to describe statistical data. This paper will give an overview of the different approaches taken to achieve the common goal of providing consistent information.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20050019444
    Description:

    There are several ways to improve data quality. One of them is to re-design and test questionnaires for ongoing surveys. The benefits of questionnaire re-design and testing include improving the accuracy by ensuring the questions collect the required data, as well as decreased response burden.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20050019453
    Description:

    The UK's Office for National Statistics (ONS) is starting a development programme for business surveys to meet the recommendations of a recent government report calling for improvements to economic statistics, in particular regional economic statistics.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20050019442
    Description:

    In 2002, the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) underwent a major change in the way in which it collects and compiles its business statistics.This initiative (known as Business Statistics Innovation Program or BSIP) aims through the use of innovative technological, methodological, organisational and operational initiatives, to re-engineer the ABS's business statistics processes, so as to improve the quality and relevance of ABS business statistics in a manner that is most efficient for both the ABS and its providers.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20050019494
    Description:

    Traditionally, data quality indicators reported by surveys have been the sampling variance, coverage error, non-response rate and imputation rate. To obtain an imputation rate when combining survey data and administrative data, one of the problems is to compute the imputation rate itself. The presentation will discuss how to solve this problem. First, we will discuss the desired properties when developing a rate in a general context. Second, we will develop some concepts and definitions that will help us to develop combine rates. Third, we will propose different combined rates for the case of imputation. We will then present three different combined rates, and we will discuss properties for each rate. We will end with some illustrative examples.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20050019434
    Description:

    Traditional methods for statistical disclosure limitation in tabular data are cell suppression, data rounding and data perturbation. Because the suppression mechanism is not describable in probabilistic terms, suppressed tables are not amenable to statistical methods such as imputation. Data quality characteristics of suppressed tables are consequently poor.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20050019470
    Description:

    Statistics Netherlands is confronted with several developments in society that have a substantial impact on its task of collecting, processing and publishing statistics. Most importantly, Statistics Netherlands has to reduce the administrative burden put upon companies and households. If relevant data are available elsewhere, they should not be collected once again in a survey. This change from survey-based statistics to register-based statistics has a substantial impact on the organisation. This paper describes some of the challenges of this transformation process.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20050019466
    Description:

    A class of estimators based on the dependency structure of a multivariate variable of interest and the survey design is defined. It will be shown by a MonteCarlo simulation how the adoption of the estimator corresponding to the population structure is more efficient than the others.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20050019462
    Description:

    The traditional approach to presenting variance information to data users is to publish estimates of variance or related statistics, such as standard errors, coefficients of variation, confidence limits or simple grading systems. The paper examines potential sources of variance, such as sample design, sample allocation, sample selection, non-response, and considers what might best be done to reduce variance. Finally, the paper assesses briefly the financial costs to producers and users of reducing or not reducing variance and how we might trade off the costs of producing more accurate statistics against the financial benefits of greater accuracy.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20050019469
    Description:

    The 1990s was the decade of longitudinal surveys in Canada. The focus was squarely on the benefits that could be derived from the increased analytical power of longitudinal surveys. This presentation explores issues of insights gained, timeliness, data access, survey design, complexity, research capacity, survey governance and knowledge mobilisation. This presentation outlines some of the issues that are likely to be raised in any debate regarding longitudinal surveys.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

Date modified: