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All (21)

All (21) (21 of 21 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201301011873
    Description:

    A computer simulation model of physical activity was developed for the Canadian adult population using longitudinal data from the National Population Health Survey and cross-sectional data from the Canadian Community Health Survey. The model is based on the Population Health Model (POHEM) platform developed by Statistics Canada. This article presents an overview of POHEM and describes the additions that were made to create the physical activity module (POHEM-PA). These additions include changes in physical activity over time, and the relationship between physical activity levels and health-adjusted life expectancy, life expectancy and the onset of selected chronic conditions. Estimates from simulation projections are compared with nationally representative survey data to provide an indication of the validity of POHEM-PA.

    Release date: 2013-10-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2013351
    Description:

    Measures of subjective well-being are increasingly prominent in international policy discussions about how best to measure "societal progress" and the well-being of national populations. This has implications for national statistical offices, as calls have been made for them to include measures of subjective well-being in their household surveys (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development 2013). Statistics Canada has included measures of subjective well-being - particularly life satisfaction - in its surveys for twenty-five years, although the wording of these questions and the response categories have evolved over time. Statistics Canada's General Social Survey (GSS) and Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) offer a valuable opportunity to examine the stability of life satisfaction responses and their correlates from year to year using a consistent analytical framework.

    Release date: 2013-10-11

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300811857
    Description:

    Using data from the Canadian Cancer Registry, vital statistics and population statistics, this study examines the assumption of stable age-standardized sex- and cancer-site-specific incidence-to-mortality rate ratios across regions, which underlies the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries' (NAACCR) completeness of case indicator.

    Release date: 2013-08-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201300111831
    Description:

    We consider conservative variance estimation for the Horvitz-Thompson estimator of a population total in sampling designs with zero pairwise inclusion probabilities, known as "non-measurable" designs. We decompose the standard Horvitz-Thompson variance estimator under such designs and characterize the bias precisely. We develop a bias correction that is guaranteed to be weakly conservative (nonnegatively biased) regardless of the nature of the non-measurability. The analysis sheds light on conditions under which the standard Horvitz-Thompson variance estimator performs well despite non-measurability and where the conservative bias correction may outperform commonly-used approximations.

    Release date: 2013-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201300111827
    Description:

    SILC (Statistics on Income and Living Conditions) is an annual European survey that measures the population's income distribution, poverty and living conditions. It has been conducted in Switzerland since 2007, based on a four-panel rotation scheme that yields both cross-sectional and longitudinal estimates. This article examines the problem of estimating the variance of the cross-sectional poverty and social exclusion indicators selected by Eurostat. Our calculations take into account the non-linearity of the estimators, total non-response at different survey stages, indirect sampling and calibration. We adapt the method proposed by Lavallée (2002) for estimating variance in cases of non-response after weight sharing, and we obtain a variance estimator that is asymptotically unbiased and very easy to program.

    Release date: 2013-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201300111824
    Description:

    In most surveys all sample units receive the same treatment and the same design features apply to all selected people and households. In this paper, it is explained how survey designs may be tailored to optimize quality given constraints on costs. Such designs are called adaptive survey designs. The basic ingredients of such designs are introduced, discussed and illustrated with various examples.

    Release date: 2013-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201300111823
    Description:

    Although weights are widely used in survey sampling their ultimate justification from the design perspective is often problematical. Here we will argue for a stepwise Bayes justification for weights that does not depend explicitly on the sampling design. This approach will make use of the standard kind of information present in auxiliary variables however it will not assume a model relating the auxiliary variables to the characteristic of interest. The resulting weight for a unit in the sample can be given the usual interpretation as the number of units in the population which it represents.

    Release date: 2013-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201300111830
    Description:

    We consider two different self-benchmarking methods for the estimation of small area means based on the Fay-Herriot (FH) area level model: the method of You and Rao (2002) applied to the FH model and the method of Wang, Fuller and Qu (2008) based on augmented models. We derive an estimator of the mean squared prediction error (MSPE) of the You-Rao (YR) estimator of a small area mean that, under the true model, is correct to second-order terms. We report the results of a simulation study on the relative bias of the MSPE estimator of the YR estimator and the MSPE estimator of the Wang, Fuller and Qu (WFQ) estimator obtained under an augmented model. We also study the MSPE and the estimators of MSPE for the YR and WFQ estimators obtained under a misspecified model.

    Release date: 2013-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201300111828
    Description:

    A question that commonly arises in longitudinal surveys is the issue of how to combine differing cohorts of the survey. In this paper we present a novel method for combining different cohorts, and using all available data, in a longitudinal survey to estimate parameters of a semiparametric model, which relates the response variable to a set of covariates. The procedure builds upon the Weighted Generalized Estimation Equation method for handling missing waves in longitudinal studies. Our method is set up under a joint-randomization framework for estimation of model parameters, which takes into account the superpopulation model as well as the survey design randomization. We also propose a design-based, and a joint-randomization, variance estimation method. To illustrate the methodology we apply it to the Survey of Doctorate Recipients, conducted by the U.S. National Science Foundation.

    Release date: 2013-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201300111829
    Description:

    Indirect Sampling is used when the sampling frame is not the same as the target population, but related to the latter. The estimation process for Indirect Sampling is carried out using the Generalised Weight Share Method (GWSM), which is an unbiased procedure (see Lavallée 2002, 2007). For business surveys, Indirect Sampling is applied as follows: the sampling frame is one of establishments, while the target population is one of enterprises. Enterprises are selected through their establishments. This allows stratifying according to the establishment characteristics, rather than those associated with enterprises. Because the variables of interest of establishments are generally highly skewed (a small portion of the establishments covers the major portion of the economy), the GWSM results in unbiased estimates, but their variance can be large. The purpose of this paper is to suggest some adjustments to the weights to reduce the variance of the estimates in the context of skewed populations, while keeping the method unbiased. After a brief overview of Indirect Sampling and the GWSM, we describe the required adjustments to the GWSM. The estimates produced with these adjustments are compared to those from the original GWSM, via a small numerical example, and using real data originating from the Statistics Canada's Business Register.

    Release date: 2013-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201300111826
    Description:

    It is routine practice for survey organizations to provide replication weights as part of survey data files. These replication weights are meant to produce valid and efficient variance estimates for a variety of estimators in a simple and systematic manner. Most existing methods for constructing replication weights, however, are only valid for specific sampling designs and typically require a very large number of replicates. In this paper we first show how to produce replication weights based on the method outlined in Fay (1984) such that the resulting replication variance estimator is algebraically equivalent to the fully efficient linearization variance estimator for any given sampling design. We then propose a novel weight-calibration method to simultaneously achieve efficiency and sparsity in the sense that a small number of sets of replication weights can produce valid and efficient replication variance estimators for key population parameters. Our proposed method can be used in conjunction with existing resampling techniques for large-scale complex surveys. Validity of the proposed methods and extensions to some balanced sampling designs are also discussed. Simulation results showed that our proposed variance estimators perform very well in tracking coverage probabilities of confidence intervals. Our proposed strategies will likely have impact on how public-use survey data files are produced and how these data sets are analyzed.

    Release date: 2013-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201300111825
    Description:

    A considerable limitation of current methods for automatic data editing is that they treat all edits as hard constraints. That is to say, an edit failure is always attributed to an error in the data. In manual editing, however, subject-matter specialists also make extensive use of soft edits, i.e., constraints that identify (combinations of) values that are suspicious but not necessarily incorrect. The inability of automatic editing methods to handle soft edits partly explains why in practice many differences are found between manually edited and automatically edited data. The object of this article is to present a new formulation of the error localisation problem which can distinguish between hard and soft edits. Moreover, it is shown how this problem may be solved by an extension of the error localisation algorithm of De Waal and Quere (2003).

    Release date: 2013-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300611796
    Description:

    The study assesses the feasibility of using statistical modelling techniques to fill information gaps related to risk factors, specifically, smoking status, in linked long-form census data.

    Release date: 2013-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300511792
    Description:

    This article describes implementation of the indoor air component of the 2009 to 2011 Canadian Health Measures Survey and presents information about response rates and results of field quality control samples.

    Release date: 2013-05-15

  • Index and guides: 99-001-X2011001
    Description:

    The National Household Survey User Guide is a reference document that describes the various phases of the National Household Survey (NHS). It provides an overview of the 2011 NHS content, sampling design and collection, data processing, data quality assessment and data dissemination. The National Household Survey User Guide may be useful to both new and experienced users who wish to familiarize themselves with and find specific information about the 2011 NHS.

    Release date: 2013-05-08

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201300211782
    Description:

    Statistics Canada has developed a methodology to derive estimates of the value of residential real estate using property assessment files received from municipalities across Canada. These estimates differ from the current estimates contained in the National Balance Sheet Account. This note outlines the different ways to measure the value of the stock of residential real estate, compares the different methods and provides guidance to users as to when they should use a particular estimate.

    Release date: 2013-04-25

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2013001
    Description:

    In the fall of 2008, Statistics Canada, in partnership with Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Canadian academic community, put into the field the Canadian Household Panel Survey Pilot (CHPS-Pilot). This paper describes the background of the project, the steps taken in the development of the pilot survey, and the results of a series of explorations of the data collected.

    Release date: 2013-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2013002
    Description:

    Data matching is a common practice used to reduce the response burden of respondents and to improve the quality of the information collected from respondents when the linkage method does not introduce bias. However, historical linkage, which consists in linking external records from previous years to the year of the initial wave of a survey, is relatively rare and, until now, had not been used at Statistics Canada. The present paper describes the method used to link the records from the Living in Canada Survey pilot to historical tax data on income and labour (T1 and T4 files). It presents the evolution of the linkage rate going back over time and compares earnings data collected from personal income tax returns with those collected from employers file. To illustrate the new possibilities of analysis offered by this type of linkage, the study concludes with an earnings profile by age and sex for different cohorts based on year of birth.

    Release date: 2013-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300111765
    Description:

    This study describes how items collected from parents/guardians for a nationally representative sample of Aboriginal children (off reserve) as part of the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey could be used as language indicators.

    Release date: 2013-01-16

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300111764
    Description:

    This study compares two sources of information about prescription drug use by people aged 65 or older in Ontario - the Canadian Community Health Survey and the drug claimsdatabase of the Ontario Drug Benefit Program. The analysis pertains to cardiovascular and diabetes drugs because they are commonly used, and almost all are prescribed on a regular basis.

    Release date: 2013-01-16

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Analysis (20)

Analysis (20) (20 of 20 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201301011873
    Description:

    A computer simulation model of physical activity was developed for the Canadian adult population using longitudinal data from the National Population Health Survey and cross-sectional data from the Canadian Community Health Survey. The model is based on the Population Health Model (POHEM) platform developed by Statistics Canada. This article presents an overview of POHEM and describes the additions that were made to create the physical activity module (POHEM-PA). These additions include changes in physical activity over time, and the relationship between physical activity levels and health-adjusted life expectancy, life expectancy and the onset of selected chronic conditions. Estimates from simulation projections are compared with nationally representative survey data to provide an indication of the validity of POHEM-PA.

    Release date: 2013-10-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2013351
    Description:

    Measures of subjective well-being are increasingly prominent in international policy discussions about how best to measure "societal progress" and the well-being of national populations. This has implications for national statistical offices, as calls have been made for them to include measures of subjective well-being in their household surveys (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development 2013). Statistics Canada has included measures of subjective well-being - particularly life satisfaction - in its surveys for twenty-five years, although the wording of these questions and the response categories have evolved over time. Statistics Canada's General Social Survey (GSS) and Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) offer a valuable opportunity to examine the stability of life satisfaction responses and their correlates from year to year using a consistent analytical framework.

    Release date: 2013-10-11

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300811857
    Description:

    Using data from the Canadian Cancer Registry, vital statistics and population statistics, this study examines the assumption of stable age-standardized sex- and cancer-site-specific incidence-to-mortality rate ratios across regions, which underlies the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries' (NAACCR) completeness of case indicator.

    Release date: 2013-08-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201300111831
    Description:

    We consider conservative variance estimation for the Horvitz-Thompson estimator of a population total in sampling designs with zero pairwise inclusion probabilities, known as "non-measurable" designs. We decompose the standard Horvitz-Thompson variance estimator under such designs and characterize the bias precisely. We develop a bias correction that is guaranteed to be weakly conservative (nonnegatively biased) regardless of the nature of the non-measurability. The analysis sheds light on conditions under which the standard Horvitz-Thompson variance estimator performs well despite non-measurability and where the conservative bias correction may outperform commonly-used approximations.

    Release date: 2013-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201300111827
    Description:

    SILC (Statistics on Income and Living Conditions) is an annual European survey that measures the population's income distribution, poverty and living conditions. It has been conducted in Switzerland since 2007, based on a four-panel rotation scheme that yields both cross-sectional and longitudinal estimates. This article examines the problem of estimating the variance of the cross-sectional poverty and social exclusion indicators selected by Eurostat. Our calculations take into account the non-linearity of the estimators, total non-response at different survey stages, indirect sampling and calibration. We adapt the method proposed by Lavallée (2002) for estimating variance in cases of non-response after weight sharing, and we obtain a variance estimator that is asymptotically unbiased and very easy to program.

    Release date: 2013-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201300111824
    Description:

    In most surveys all sample units receive the same treatment and the same design features apply to all selected people and households. In this paper, it is explained how survey designs may be tailored to optimize quality given constraints on costs. Such designs are called adaptive survey designs. The basic ingredients of such designs are introduced, discussed and illustrated with various examples.

    Release date: 2013-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201300111823
    Description:

    Although weights are widely used in survey sampling their ultimate justification from the design perspective is often problematical. Here we will argue for a stepwise Bayes justification for weights that does not depend explicitly on the sampling design. This approach will make use of the standard kind of information present in auxiliary variables however it will not assume a model relating the auxiliary variables to the characteristic of interest. The resulting weight for a unit in the sample can be given the usual interpretation as the number of units in the population which it represents.

    Release date: 2013-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201300111830
    Description:

    We consider two different self-benchmarking methods for the estimation of small area means based on the Fay-Herriot (FH) area level model: the method of You and Rao (2002) applied to the FH model and the method of Wang, Fuller and Qu (2008) based on augmented models. We derive an estimator of the mean squared prediction error (MSPE) of the You-Rao (YR) estimator of a small area mean that, under the true model, is correct to second-order terms. We report the results of a simulation study on the relative bias of the MSPE estimator of the YR estimator and the MSPE estimator of the Wang, Fuller and Qu (WFQ) estimator obtained under an augmented model. We also study the MSPE and the estimators of MSPE for the YR and WFQ estimators obtained under a misspecified model.

    Release date: 2013-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201300111828
    Description:

    A question that commonly arises in longitudinal surveys is the issue of how to combine differing cohorts of the survey. In this paper we present a novel method for combining different cohorts, and using all available data, in a longitudinal survey to estimate parameters of a semiparametric model, which relates the response variable to a set of covariates. The procedure builds upon the Weighted Generalized Estimation Equation method for handling missing waves in longitudinal studies. Our method is set up under a joint-randomization framework for estimation of model parameters, which takes into account the superpopulation model as well as the survey design randomization. We also propose a design-based, and a joint-randomization, variance estimation method. To illustrate the methodology we apply it to the Survey of Doctorate Recipients, conducted by the U.S. National Science Foundation.

    Release date: 2013-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201300111829
    Description:

    Indirect Sampling is used when the sampling frame is not the same as the target population, but related to the latter. The estimation process for Indirect Sampling is carried out using the Generalised Weight Share Method (GWSM), which is an unbiased procedure (see Lavallée 2002, 2007). For business surveys, Indirect Sampling is applied as follows: the sampling frame is one of establishments, while the target population is one of enterprises. Enterprises are selected through their establishments. This allows stratifying according to the establishment characteristics, rather than those associated with enterprises. Because the variables of interest of establishments are generally highly skewed (a small portion of the establishments covers the major portion of the economy), the GWSM results in unbiased estimates, but their variance can be large. The purpose of this paper is to suggest some adjustments to the weights to reduce the variance of the estimates in the context of skewed populations, while keeping the method unbiased. After a brief overview of Indirect Sampling and the GWSM, we describe the required adjustments to the GWSM. The estimates produced with these adjustments are compared to those from the original GWSM, via a small numerical example, and using real data originating from the Statistics Canada's Business Register.

    Release date: 2013-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201300111826
    Description:

    It is routine practice for survey organizations to provide replication weights as part of survey data files. These replication weights are meant to produce valid and efficient variance estimates for a variety of estimators in a simple and systematic manner. Most existing methods for constructing replication weights, however, are only valid for specific sampling designs and typically require a very large number of replicates. In this paper we first show how to produce replication weights based on the method outlined in Fay (1984) such that the resulting replication variance estimator is algebraically equivalent to the fully efficient linearization variance estimator for any given sampling design. We then propose a novel weight-calibration method to simultaneously achieve efficiency and sparsity in the sense that a small number of sets of replication weights can produce valid and efficient replication variance estimators for key population parameters. Our proposed method can be used in conjunction with existing resampling techniques for large-scale complex surveys. Validity of the proposed methods and extensions to some balanced sampling designs are also discussed. Simulation results showed that our proposed variance estimators perform very well in tracking coverage probabilities of confidence intervals. Our proposed strategies will likely have impact on how public-use survey data files are produced and how these data sets are analyzed.

    Release date: 2013-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201300111825
    Description:

    A considerable limitation of current methods for automatic data editing is that they treat all edits as hard constraints. That is to say, an edit failure is always attributed to an error in the data. In manual editing, however, subject-matter specialists also make extensive use of soft edits, i.e., constraints that identify (combinations of) values that are suspicious but not necessarily incorrect. The inability of automatic editing methods to handle soft edits partly explains why in practice many differences are found between manually edited and automatically edited data. The object of this article is to present a new formulation of the error localisation problem which can distinguish between hard and soft edits. Moreover, it is shown how this problem may be solved by an extension of the error localisation algorithm of De Waal and Quere (2003).

    Release date: 2013-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300611796
    Description:

    The study assesses the feasibility of using statistical modelling techniques to fill information gaps related to risk factors, specifically, smoking status, in linked long-form census data.

    Release date: 2013-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300511792
    Description:

    This article describes implementation of the indoor air component of the 2009 to 2011 Canadian Health Measures Survey and presents information about response rates and results of field quality control samples.

    Release date: 2013-05-15

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201300211782
    Description:

    Statistics Canada has developed a methodology to derive estimates of the value of residential real estate using property assessment files received from municipalities across Canada. These estimates differ from the current estimates contained in the National Balance Sheet Account. This note outlines the different ways to measure the value of the stock of residential real estate, compares the different methods and provides guidance to users as to when they should use a particular estimate.

    Release date: 2013-04-25

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2013001
    Description:

    In the fall of 2008, Statistics Canada, in partnership with Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Canadian academic community, put into the field the Canadian Household Panel Survey Pilot (CHPS-Pilot). This paper describes the background of the project, the steps taken in the development of the pilot survey, and the results of a series of explorations of the data collected.

    Release date: 2013-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 89-648-X2013002
    Description:

    Data matching is a common practice used to reduce the response burden of respondents and to improve the quality of the information collected from respondents when the linkage method does not introduce bias. However, historical linkage, which consists in linking external records from previous years to the year of the initial wave of a survey, is relatively rare and, until now, had not been used at Statistics Canada. The present paper describes the method used to link the records from the Living in Canada Survey pilot to historical tax data on income and labour (T1 and T4 files). It presents the evolution of the linkage rate going back over time and compares earnings data collected from personal income tax returns with those collected from employers file. To illustrate the new possibilities of analysis offered by this type of linkage, the study concludes with an earnings profile by age and sex for different cohorts based on year of birth.

    Release date: 2013-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300111765
    Description:

    This study describes how items collected from parents/guardians for a nationally representative sample of Aboriginal children (off reserve) as part of the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey could be used as language indicators.

    Release date: 2013-01-16

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300111764
    Description:

    This study compares two sources of information about prescription drug use by people aged 65 or older in Ontario - the Canadian Community Health Survey and the drug claimsdatabase of the Ontario Drug Benefit Program. The analysis pertains to cardiovascular and diabetes drugs because they are commonly used, and almost all are prescribed on a regular basis.

    Release date: 2013-01-16

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Index and guides: 99-001-X2011001
    Description:

    The National Household Survey User Guide is a reference document that describes the various phases of the National Household Survey (NHS). It provides an overview of the 2011 NHS content, sampling design and collection, data processing, data quality assessment and data dissemination. The National Household Survey User Guide may be useful to both new and experienced users who wish to familiarize themselves with and find specific information about the 2011 NHS.

    Release date: 2013-05-08

Date modified: