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The Daily

The Daily. Tuesday, September 25, 2001

Population estimates

July 1, 2001 (preliminary)

Canada's population has surpassed the 31-million mark. As of July 1, 2001, the population was estimated at 31,081,900.

From July 1, 2000 to July 1, 2001, the population increased by 312,200 people, the largest annual population rise since 1996/97, surpassing the estimated  270,500 in the 1999/2000 period.

The population grew by an estimated 1.0% in 2000/01, compared with increases of less than 0.9% during the previous three years.

The main factors behind this higher growth were an influx of 252,100 immigrants to Canada in 2000/01, about 46,000 more than in 1999/2000. In addition, the number of non-permanent residents rose by 22,900 in 2000/01, almost double the estimated number in 1999/2000. On July 1, an estimated 287,700 non-permanent residents were living in Canada.

The population increased in all provinces and territories except Newfoundland, Saskatchewan, Yukon and Northwest Territories. The decline in these areas was the result mainly of net outflows due to migration to other provinces or territories.

  

Note to readers

Preliminary population estimates are available today for Canada, the provinces and the territories as of July 1, as well as revised estimates for 1998, 1999 and 2000. Population estimates are revised using birth, death and migration statistics when they become available. Revisions may result in notable changes for certain components, particularly for interprovincial migration.

Interprovincial migration data are derived from two sources. Preliminary migration estimates are based on changes of addresses recorded in the child tax benefit files from Canada Customs and Revenue Agency, and are available shortly after the reference month.

Final interprovincial migration estimates are based on addresses supplied on personal income tax returns, and are available a year and a half after the reference year. The latest data available from this source are for 1999/2000.

Non-permanent residents are those in Canada claiming refugee status or who hold a student authorization, employment authorization or minister's permit, plus their non-Canadian born dependants.

  

Population growth rate


  1998/99 1999/2000 2000/01
  %
Canada 0.8 0.9 1.0
       
Newfoundland -0.8 -0.6 -0.6
Prince Edward Island 0.5 0.3 0.3
Nova Scotia 0.4 0.2 0.2
New Brunswick 0.1 0.1 0.2
Quebec 0.4 0.4 0.4
Ontario 1.2 1.4 1.6
Manitoba 0.4 0.3 0.4
Saskatchewan 0.1 -0.3 -0.6
Alberta 1.8 1.7 1.8
British Columbia 0.8 0.8 0.9
Yukon -1.5 -1.5 -2.3
Northwest Territories -0.1 -0.2 -0.1
Nunavut 1.6 2.1 2.7

For the fifth straight year, Alberta had the fastest rate of growth among the provinces at 1.8%. Ontario was a close second at 1.6%, and Nunavut was third at 2.7%. All other regions saw growth lower than the national average.

Newfoundland declined

New Brunswick's population increased 0.2% to 757,100. This rate, slightly higher than for 1999/2000, was mainly the result of a lower net outflow to other provinces.

Prince Edward Island's population increased 0.3%, about the same growth rate as in 1999/2000; Nova Scotia's rose 0.2%, also about the same.

Newfoundland's population declined 0.6% for the second year in a row to 533,800. This decrease was the result of a large outflow of people to other parts of Canada.

Quebec saw slight increase in growth

Quebec's population reached an estimated 7,410,500, up 0.4% or about 32,900 people, compared with an increase of 28,000 as of July 1.

Quebec attracted 36,700 immigrants in 2000/01, about 6,400 more than in 1999/2000. The number of non-permanent residents arriving in Quebec was also up, resulting in a net increase of 2,100.

Ontario posted strong immigration growth

Ontario accounted for more than 60% of the nation's population growth from July 1, 2000 to July 1, 2001. Ontario's population was estimated at 11,874,400, a gain of about 189,100.

The growth rate of 1.6% in 2000/01 was slightly higher than the 1.4% gain in 1999/2000, the result of a much higher number of immigrants entering the province. Ontario attracted 149,900 immigrants in 2000/01, about 33,100 more than in 1999/2000.

Although Ontario's population accounted for less than 40% of the population of the country, almost 60% of all immigrants arriving in Canada settled there.

The net number of non-permanent residents also rose to 10,400 in 2000/01 from 6,200 in 1999/2000. Almost 45% of non-permanent residents living in Canada were in Ontario.

Alberta the fastest-growing province in the west

For the fifth straight year, Alberta had the fastest rate of growth among the provinces. As of July 1, Alberta's population was estimated at 3,064,200.

Alberta had a net inflow of 25,700 people from interprovincial migration in 2000/01, a slight increase over the 22,700 net inflow in 1999/2000. Immigration increased as well, to 16,100 from 12,900.

British Columbia's population grew 0.9% to 4,095,900, a slightly faster pace than 0.8% in 1999/2000. This was the result of an increase in the number of immigrants, to 39,400 from 36,900, and of the net number of non-permanent residents, to 6,600 from 2,700.

During the past decade, both Alberta and British Columbia have recorded strong growth. Since 1991, British Columbia's population has increased 21.4%, almost double the national average of 10.9%. Alberta's population increased 18.2% during the same period.

Manitoba's growth rate accelerated slightly during 2000/01. A combination of slight growth in immigration and interprovincial migration pushed up the population by 4,100, compared with 3,500 in 1999/2000. Manitoba's population was estimated at 1,150,000 as of July 1.

Saskatchewan's population declined 0.6% in 2000/01, twice as fast as the 0.3% decline in 1999/2000. The decline was largely a result of an increase in net outflow to other provinces. As of July 1, its population was estimated at 1,015,800.

Sharp differences in the north

Nunavut saw the nation's highest population growth rate in 2000/01, rising to 2.7% from 2.1% in 1999/2000. The territory's population was estimated at 28,200. Although the growth was mainly driven by high fertility rates, it also incurred a higher net inflow of people from other regions.

The population of Yukon declined 2.3%, while that of the Northwest Territories fell a marginal 0.1%.

Available on CANSIM: tables 510004-510006, 510008, 510009 and 510017-510020.

These estimates will appear soon in Quarterly demographic statistics (91-002-XIB, $8/$25; 91-002-XPB, $10/$33).

To obtain these data, contact Lise Champagne (613-951-2320; fax: 613-951-2307; lise.champagne@statcan.gc.ca), Demography Division or the nearest Regional Reference Centre. For more information, or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, contact Daniel Larrivée (613-951-0694; fax: 613-951-2307; daniel.larrivee@statcan.gc.ca), Demography Division.

Population estimates as of July 1, 2001


  1998(pr) 1999(pr) 2000(pr) 2001(pp)
Canada 30,248,210 30,499,219 30,769,669 31,081,887
         
Newfoundland 545,294 540,714 537,221 533,761
Prince Edward Island 136,895 137,604 138,065 138,514
Nova Scotia 936,083 939,726 941,199 942,691
New Brunswick 753,345 754,406 755,278 757,077
Quebec 7,323,600 7,349,685 7,377,654 7,410,504
Ontario 11,387,312 11,522,677 11,685,304 11,874,436
Manitoba 1,137,902 1,142,439 1,145,966 1,150,034
Saskatchewan 1,024,872 1,025,495 1,021,992 1,015,783
Alberta 2,906,820 2,959,504 3,009,249 3,064,249
British Columbia 3,997,087 4,028,072 4,058,833 4,095,934
Yukon 31,522 31,038 30,582 29,885
Northwest Territories 41,050 40,999 40,907 40,860
Nunavut 26,428 26,860 27,419 28,159
prUpdated postcensal estimates.
ppPreliminary postcensal estimates.

Net interprovincial migration estimates(1)


  1997/98 1998/99 1999/2000 2000/01
Newfoundland -9,490 -5,695 -4,263 -3,541
Prince Edward Island -416 193 104 71
Nova Scotia -2,569 201 -270 -824
New Brunswick -3,192 -1,244 -1,183 -81
Quebec -16,958 -13,065 -12,146 -11,782
Ontario 9,231 16,706 22,369 17,877
Manitoba -5,276 -2,113 -3,456 -3,094
Saskatchewan -1,940 -4,333 -7,947 -10,453
Alberta 43,089 25,191 22,674 25,748
British Columbia -10,029 -14,484 -14,610 -12,689
Yukon -1,024 -747 -691 -846
Northwest Territories -1,316 -555 -651 -606
Nunavut -110 -55 70 220
1The 1997/98 to 1999/2000 migration data are derived from income tax returns; the 2000/01 data are based on monthly address changes as recorded in child tax benefit files.
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Date Modified: 2001-09-25 Important Notices