Participation rate, by student status and immigrant status

One out of five recent immigrants with university education were in school; most of these immigrant students were not working or looking for work

  • While over half of recent immigrants to Canada (i.e., those who landed from 2002 to 2007) had a university degree, they were more likely to enrol in school than Canadian-born people with degrees. In 2007, nearly 61,000 or one out of every five (19%) recent arrivals aged 25 to 54 who had a university degree were enrolled in school; in comparison, less than one-tenth (7%) of Canadian-born degree-holders were enrolled in school. Degree-holding recent immigrants in school were also not as likely to work or look for work. Less than one-half of them (45%) did so in 2007, whereas three-quarters (73%) of university-educated Canadian-born students were working or looking for work.

  • Just under half of these university-educated immigrant students were enrolled in university in 2007. The remainder were enrolled in either college or other educational programs (including language training and accreditation or professional upgrade programs). In contrast, most (77%) university-educated Canadian-born students were enrolled in university in 2007.

  • In 2007, the labour force participation rate of university-educated, immigrant, non-student men was similar to that of their Canadian-born counterparts, 94.0% and 96.8%, respectively. There was a large gap, however, between university-educated, immigrant, non-student women and their Canadian-born peers (69.3% vs. 92.1%).

Chart N.6
Participation rate of university-educated Canadians, population aged 25 to 54, by student status and immigrant status, 2007

Chart N.6  Participation rate of university-educated Canadians, population aged 25 to 54, by student status and immigrant status, 2007

Source: Statistics Canada, Labour Force Survey, 2007.

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