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Employment Insurance

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February 2009 (preliminary) (Previous release)

In February, the number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance (EI) benefits increased by 44,300 or 7.8% from January. Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario and Saskatchewan experienced the strongest increases.

Sharp increase in number of people receiving regular benefits

In recent months, labour market conditions in Canada have deteriorated significantly. Through the early part of 2008, employment slowed, and since October has fallen sharply.

The number of regular EI beneficiaries has climbed 21.9% since October 2008, reaching 610,200 in February.

Over the same period, the number of regular EI beneficiaries has increased in almost all provinces and territories, with the largest percentage gains in Alberta, British Columbia and Ontario.

Note to readers

Each month, Statistics Canada will be providing enhanced analysis of the current labour market situation, using Employment Insurance (EI) statistics and other sources. The Labour Force Survey (LFS) will provide the first picture of overall labour market conditions, with unemployment and total employment and who is affected by changes in the labour market. Later in the month, Statistics Canada will provide additional regional detail through the EI statistics and detail by industry through the Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours.

EI statistics are produced from an administrative data source and may, from time to time, be affected by changes to the Employment Insurance Act or administrative procedures. The number of regular beneficiaries and the number of claims received for January and February 2009 are preliminary.

The number of beneficiaries is a measure of all persons who received EI benefits from the 15th to the 21th of February. This period coincides with the reference week of the Labour Force Survey for February.

Regional EI data and data by sex and age are not seasonally adjusted and therefore should only be compared on a year-over-year basis. These comparisons can be influenced by unusual spikes or declines in the end points of the period.

EI statistics indicate the number of people who received EI benefits, and should not be confused with data coming from the Labour Force Survey, which provides information on the total number of unemployed.

There is always a certain proportion of unemployed who do not qualify for benefits. The first are those who have not contributed to the program because they have not worked in the past 12 months or their employment is not insurable. This group includes self-employed workers. The second are those who have contributed to the program, but do not meet the eligibility criteria, such as workers who left their job voluntarily or those who did not accumulate enough hours of work to receive benefits.

The data on employment and employment by industry used in this analysis are drawn from the Labour Force Survey.

Growth in the number of people receiving regular benefits since October 2008 is strongest in Alberta

The West and Ontario show largest increases in number of beneficiaries

In Alberta, the number of regular beneficiaries jumped by 27.3% in one month to 30,600 in February, bringing the total increase since October 2008 to 67.9%.

The number of beneficiaries in British Columbia reached 63,700 after an 11.6% increase in February. The total increase since October 2008 was 39.8%.

In Ontario, the 7.8% increase in February brought the number of regular EI beneficiaries to 198,900. Since October 2008, the number of beneficiaries has risen by 28.6%.

From January to February, the number of beneficiaries in Saskatchewan rose 7.3% to 10,000. Since October 2008, the number of beneficiaries has risen 17.6%, slower than the national average of 21.9%.

Demographic and regional overview: Sharp increase in male beneficiaries

Regional data and data by sex and age on Employment Insurance are not seasonally adjusted and therefore should only be compared on a year-over-year basis.

Between February 2008 and February 2009, there was a larger increase in the number of men receiving regular benefits (+36.7%) compared with women (+20.6%).

The number of beneficiaries doubled in most large centres in Alberta

All census metropolitan areas in Canada have seen an increase in the number of regular beneficiaries in the past year.

The number of beneficiaries doubled in most large centres in Alberta between February 2008 and February 2009. In Calgary, the number of regular beneficiaries more than doubled to 11,700. In Edmonton, the 96.4% increase brought the number of beneficiaries to 10,900. Red Deer, Lethbridge, Wood Buffalo and Grande Prairie all doubled in number of beneficiaries. In Alberta, the drop in employment in recent months was spread across a number of sectors, including construction, trade, manufacturing and professional, scientific and technical services.

Sharp increases were also observed in Southwestern Ontario (map) between February 2008 and February 2009. In Windsor, the number of regular beneficiaries climbed 103.8% to 11,700. Also affected were Kitchener (+96.0%), Hamilton (+83.4%) and London (+82.9%), as were Guelph, Tillsonburg, Woodstock, Stratford and Barrie. In Toronto, the number of regular beneficiaries rose 60.6%. During the same period, the sectors of the Ontario economy experiencing steep declines in employment were manufacturing; business, building and other support services; and construction and trade.

Between February 2008 and February 2009, the increase in the number of beneficiaries in British Columbia was widespread. At the same time, the decrease in employment affected a large number of sectors, including manufacturing; construction; transportation and warehousing; retail trade; and forestry and logging.

In British Columbia, the number of beneficiaries almost tripled in Williams Lake, and it doubled further north in Quesnel. The number also roughly doubled in Kelowna, Cranbrook, Chilliwack, Powell River and Penticton. In Victoria the number of beneficiaries increased 88.8%, while in Vancouver, the 12,300 additional beneficiaries represented an increase of 75.3% in one year.

Claims continue to flow in

To receive EI benefits, individuals must first submit a claim. Statistics on claims cover the month and provide an indication of the number of people who could become beneficiaries. In February, 325,700 claims were received, the largest number since comparable data are available in 1997. The number of claims received in Canada in February was up 51,000 or 18.6% from January.

There were more claims received in all provinces in February compared with January. The strongest increases were in Alberta (+27.7%) and Manitoba (+22.3%).

Available on CANSIM: tables 276-0001 to 276-0006, 276-0009, 276-0011, 276-0015 and 276-0016.

Definitions, data sources and methods: survey number 2604.

Data tables are also now available online. From the By subject module of our website, choose Labour.

Data on Employment Insurance for March will be released on May 26.

For more information, or to order data, contact Client Services (toll-free 1-866-873-8788; 613-951-4090; labour@statcan.gc.ca). To enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, contact Dominique Pérusse (613-951-4064) or Jane Lin (613-951-9691), Labour Statistics Division.

Table 1

Employment Insurance: Statistics by province and territory
  January 2009p February 2009p January to February 2009 February 2008 to February 2009 January to February 2009 February 2008 to February 2009
  Seasonally adjusted
  number change in number % change
Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits            
Canada 565,810 610,150 44,340 153,730 7.8 33.7
Newfoundland and Labrador 37,130 38,100 970 3,620 2.6 10.5
Prince Edward Island 7,790 7,910 120 310 1.5 4.1
Nova Scotia 29,290 29,950 660 3,130 2.3 11.7
New Brunswick 30,920 32,000 1,080 2,100 3.5 7.0
Quebec 175,920 183,580 7,660 24,780 4.4 15.6
Ontario 184,520 198,880 14,360 74,420 7.8 59.8
Manitoba 11,840 12,180 340 2,420 2.9 24.8
Saskatchewan 9,320 10,000 680 2,200 7.3 28.2
Alberta 24,060 30,630 6,570 14,810 27.3 93.6
British Columbia 57,010 63,650 6,640 25,480 11.6 66.8
Yukon 880 890 10 110 1.1 14.1
Northwest Territories 810 850 40 180 4.9 26.9
Nunavut 430 450 20 140 4.7 45.2
Initial and renewal claims received            
Canada 274,680 325,650 50,970 113,090 18.6 53.2
Newfoundland and Labrador 9,590 10,030 440 1,120 4.6 12.6
Prince Edward Island 2,540 2,550 10 80 0.4 3.2
Nova Scotia 9,740 10,530 790 1,530 8.1 17.0
New Brunswick 9,900 10,650 750 1,210 7.6 12.8
Quebec 73,980 84,110 10,130 17,240 13.7 25.8
Ontario 97,470 109,870 12,400 44,320 12.7 67.6
Manitoba 7,030 8,600 1,570 2,100 22.3 32.3
Saskatchewan 5,840 6,080 240 1,710 4.1 39.1
Alberta 22,240 28,410 6,170 15,860 27.7 126.4
British Columbia 35,780 41,710 5,930 16,900 16.6 68.1
Yukon 310 310 0 10 0.0 3.3
Northwest Territories 330 320 -10 50 -3.0 18.5
Nunavut 220 200 -20 70 -9.1 53.8
preliminary
Note(s):
Number of beneficiaries receiving regular benefits exclude claimants receiving training, job creation and self-employment benefits as well as other employment and support measures benefits.

Table 2

Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by age, sex, province and territories
  February 2008 February 2009p February 2008 to February 2009 February 2008 to February 2009
  Unadjusted for seasonality
  number change in number % change
Canada        
Both sexes 602,510 791,600 189,090 31.4
Under 25 years 67,100 91,550 24,450 36.4
25 to 54 years 426,570 560,150 133,580 31.3
55 years and over 108,840 139,910 31,070 28.5
Men 404,030 552,220 148,190 36.7
Under 25 years 52,310 73,060 20,750 39.7
25 to 54 years 277,280 381,100 103,820 37.4
55 years and over 74,450 98,060 23,610 31.7
Women 198,480 239,380 40,900 20.6
Under 25 years 14,790 18,490 3,700 25.0
25 to 54 years 149,290 179,050 29,760 19.9
55 years and over 34,390 41,850 7,460 21.7
Newfoundland and Labrador        
Both sexes 45,490 49,820 4,330 9.5
Under 25 years 4,360 4,640 280 6.4
25 to 54 years 31,670 34,150 2,480 7.8
55 years and over 9,460 11,030 1,570 16.6
Men 27,710 31,360 3,650 13.2
Women 17,790 18,460 670 3.8
Prince Edward Island        
Both sexes 11,090 11,420 330 3.0
Under 25 years 1,050 1,140 90 8.6
25 to 54 years 7,430 7,500 70 0.9
55 years and over 2,610 2,770 160 6.1
Men 6,770 7,190 420 6.2
Women 4,310 4,220 -90 -2.1
Nova Scotia        
Both sexes 35,680 39,980 4,300 12.1
Under 25 years 3,700 4,420 720 19.5
25 to 54 years 25,160 27,810 2,650 10.5
55 years and over 6,820 7,750 930 13.6
Men 23,180 26,860 3,680 15.9
Women 12,500 13,130 630 5.0
New Brunswick        
Both sexes 41,260 43,700 2,440 5.9
Under 25 years 3,820 4,160 340 8.9
25 to 54 years 29,210 30,270 1,060 3.6
55 years and over 8,230 9,270 1,040 12.6
Men 27,790 30,450 2,660 9.6
Women 13,470 13,250 -220 -1.6
Quebec        
Both sexes 213,540 244,590 31,050 14.5
Under 25 years 25,950 30,520 4,570 17.6
25 to 54 years 149,560 169,470 19,910 13.3
55 years and over 38,040 44,600 6,560 17.2
Men 147,860 173,850 25,990 17.6
Women 65,680 70,740 5,060 7.7
Ontario        
Both sexes 162,280 252,810 90,530 55.8
Under 25 years 18,140 27,310 9,170 50.6
25 to 54 years 118,460 186,600 68,140 57.5
55 years and over 25,670 38,900 13,230 51.5
Men 110,190 178,160 67,970 61.7
Women 52,080 74,650 22,570 43.3
preliminary
Note(s):
Number of beneficiaries receiving regular benefits exclude claimants receiving training, job creation and self-employment benefits as well as other employment and support measures benefits.

Table 3

Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by age, sex, province and territories
  February 2008 February 2009p February 2008 to February 2009 February 2008 to February 2009
  Unadjusted for seasonality
  number change in number % change
Manitoba        
Both sexes 12,680 15,990 3,310 26.1
Under 25 years 1,670 2,270 600 35.9
25 to 54 years 8,700 11,020 2,320 26.7
55 years and over 2,310 2,700 390 16.9
Men 9,390 12,150 2,760 29.4
Women 3,290 3,840 550 16.7
Saskatchewan        
Both sexes 10,830 14,160 3,330 30.7
Under 25 years 1,200 1,690 490 40.8
25 to 54 years 7,240 9,520 2,280 31.5
55 years and over 2,390 2,950 560 23.4
Men 8,020 10,370 2,350 29.3
Women 2,820 3,790 970 34.4
Alberta        
Both sexes 19,180 36,710 17,530 91.4
Under 25 years 2,030 4,670 2,640 130.0
25 to 54 years 13,620 25,940 12,320 90.5
55 years and over 3,530 6,100 2,570 72.8
Men 12,420 25,830 13,410 108.0
Women 6,760 10,880 4,120 60.9
British Columbia        
Both sexes 48,190 79,580 31,390 65.1
Under 25 years 4,970 10,450 5,480 110.3
25 to 54 years 33,820 55,760 21,940 64.9
55 years and over 9,410 13,370 3,960 42.1
Men 29,210 54,070 24,860 85.1
Women 18,980 25,510 6,530 34.4
Yukon        
Both sexes 1,090 1,260 170 15.6
Under 25 years 100 130 30 30.0
25 to 54 years 770 860 90 11.7
55 years and over 230 270 40 17.4
Men 720 860 140 19.4
Women 370 400 30 8.1
Northwest Territories        
Both sexes 720 930 210 29.2
Under 25 years 60 90 30 50.0
25 to 54 years 540 710 170 31.5
55 years and over 120 130 10 8.3
Men 500 660 160 32.0
Women 220 270 50 22.7
Nunavut        
Both sexes 340 510 170 50.0
Under 25 years 40 50 10 25.0
25 to 54 years 270 410 140 51.9
55 years and over 30 50 20 66.7
Men 240 380 140 58.3
Women 100 140 40 40.0
preliminary
Note(s):
Number of beneficiaries receiving regular benefits exclude claimants receiving training, job creation and self-employment benefits as well as other employment and support measures benefits.

Table 4

Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by census metropolitan areas
  February 2008 February 2009p February 2008 to February 2009 February 2008 to February 2009
  Unadjusted for seasonality
  number change in number % change
Newfoundland and Labrador        
St. John's 5,330 6,030 700 13.1
Nova Scotia        
Halifax 5,290 6,570 1,280 24.2
New Brunswick        
Saint John 2,330 2,560 230 9.9
Quebec        
Saguenay 6,280 6,640 360 5.7
Québec 12,700 15,110 2,410 19.0
Sherbrooke 3,750 4,560 810 21.6
Trois-Rivières 4,380 4,790 410 9.4
Montréal 62,750 74,380 11,630 18.5
Ottawa–Gatineau, Gatineau part 3,780 4,340 560 14.8
Ontario        
Ottawa–Gatineau, Ottawa part 5,980 7,290 1,310 21.9
Kingston 1,540 1,940 400 26.0
Oshawa 5,290 6,470 1,180 22.3
Toronto 54,460 87,440 32,980 60.6
Hamilton 7,270 13,330 6,060 83.4
St. Catharines–Niagara 7,870 10,980 3,110 39.5
Kitchener 5,240 10,270 5,030 96.0
London 5,450 9,970 4,520 82.9
Windsor 5,720 11,660 5,940 103.8
Greater Sudbury 2,470 3,690 1,220 49.4
Thunder Bay 2,540 2,940 400 15.7
Manitoba        
Winnipeg 5,370 7,380 2,010 37.4
Saskatchewan        
Regina 1,220 1,350 130 10.7
Saskatoon 1,510 2,360 850 56.3
Alberta        
Calgary 5,460 11,690 6,230 114.1
Edmonton 5,540 10,880 5,340 96.4
British Columbia        
Abbotsford 2,210 3,380 1,170 52.9
Vancouver 16,290 28,550 12,260 75.3
Victoria 1,870 3,530 1,660 88.8
preliminary
Note(s):
Number of beneficiaries receiving regular benefits excludes claimants receiving training, job creation and self-employment benefits as well as other employment and support measures benefits.
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Statistics Canada
Symbol of the Government of Canada

Employment Insurance

February 2009 (preliminary) (Previous release)

In February, the number of people receiving regular Employment Insurance (EI) benefits increased by 44,300 or 7.8% from January. Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario and Saskatchewan experienced the strongest increases.

Sharp increase in number of people receiving regular benefits

In recent months, labour market conditions in Canada have deteriorated significantly. Through the early part of 2008, employment slowed, and since October has fallen sharply.

The number of regular EI beneficiaries has climbed 21.9% since October 2008, reaching 610,200 in February.

Over the same period, the number of regular EI beneficiaries has increased in almost all provinces and territories, with the largest percentage gains in Alberta, British Columbia and Ontario.

Note to readers

Each month, Statistics Canada will be providing enhanced analysis of the current labour market situation, using Employment Insurance (EI) statistics and other sources. The Labour Force Survey (LFS) will provide the first picture of overall labour market conditions, with unemployment and total employment and who is affected by changes in the labour market. Later in the month, Statistics Canada will provide additional regional detail through the EI statistics and detail by industry through the Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours.

EI statistics are produced from an administrative data source and may, from time to time, be affected by changes to the Employment Insurance Act or administrative procedures. The number of regular beneficiaries and the number of claims received for January and February 2009 are preliminary.

The number of beneficiaries is a measure of all persons who received EI benefits from the 15th to the 21th of February. This period coincides with the reference week of the Labour Force Survey for February.

Regional EI data and data by sex and age are not seasonally adjusted and therefore should only be compared on a year-over-year basis. These comparisons can be influenced by unusual spikes or declines in the end points of the period.

EI statistics indicate the number of people who received EI benefits, and should not be confused with data coming from the Labour Force Survey, which provides information on the total number of unemployed.

There is always a certain proportion of unemployed who do not qualify for benefits. The first are those who have not contributed to the program because they have not worked in the past 12 months or their employment is not insurable. This group includes self-employed workers. The second are those who have contributed to the program, but do not meet the eligibility criteria, such as workers who left their job voluntarily or those who did not accumulate enough hours of work to receive benefits.

The data on employment and employment by industry used in this analysis are drawn from the Labour Force Survey.

Growth in the number of people receiving regular benefits since October 2008 is strongest in Alberta

The West and Ontario show largest increases in number of beneficiaries

In Alberta, the number of regular beneficiaries jumped by 27.3% in one month to 30,600 in February, bringing the total increase since October 2008 to 67.9%.

The number of beneficiaries in British Columbia reached 63,700 after an 11.6% increase in February. The total increase since October 2008 was 39.8%.

In Ontario, the 7.8% increase in February brought the number of regular EI beneficiaries to 198,900. Since October 2008, the number of beneficiaries has risen by 28.6%.

From January to February, the number of beneficiaries in Saskatchewan rose 7.3% to 10,000. Since October 2008, the number of beneficiaries has risen 17.6%, slower than the national average of 21.9%.

Demographic and regional overview: Sharp increase in male beneficiaries

Regional data and data by sex and age on Employment Insurance are not seasonally adjusted and therefore should only be compared on a year-over-year basis.

Between February 2008 and February 2009, there was a larger increase in the number of men receiving regular benefits (+36.7%) compared with women (+20.6%).

The number of beneficiaries doubled in most large centres in Alberta

All census metropolitan areas in Canada have seen an increase in the number of regular beneficiaries in the past year.

The number of beneficiaries doubled in most large centres in Alberta between February 2008 and February 2009. In Calgary, the number of regular beneficiaries more than doubled to 11,700. In Edmonton, the 96.4% increase brought the number of beneficiaries to 10,900. Red Deer, Lethbridge, Wood Buffalo and Grande Prairie all doubled in number of beneficiaries. In Alberta, the drop in employment in recent months was spread across a number of sectors, including construction, trade, manufacturing and professional, scientific and technical services.

Sharp increases were also observed in Southwestern Ontario (map) between February 2008 and February 2009. In Windsor, the number of regular beneficiaries climbed 103.8% to 11,700. Also affected were Kitchener (+96.0%), Hamilton (+83.4%) and London (+82.9%), as were Guelph, Tillsonburg, Woodstock, Stratford and Barrie. In Toronto, the number of regular beneficiaries rose 60.6%. During the same period, the sectors of the Ontario economy experiencing steep declines in employment were manufacturing; business, building and other support services; and construction and trade.

Between February 2008 and February 2009, the increase in the number of beneficiaries in British Columbia was widespread. At the same time, the decrease in employment affected a large number of sectors, including manufacturing; construction; transportation and warehousing; retail trade; and forestry and logging.

In British Columbia, the number of beneficiaries almost tripled in Williams Lake, and it doubled further north in Quesnel. The number also roughly doubled in Kelowna, Cranbrook, Chilliwack, Powell River and Penticton. In Victoria the number of beneficiaries increased 88.8%, while in Vancouver, the 12,300 additional beneficiaries represented an increase of 75.3% in one year.

Claims continue to flow in

To receive EI benefits, individuals must first submit a claim. Statistics on claims cover the month and provide an indication of the number of people who could become beneficiaries. In February, 325,700 claims were received, the largest number since comparable data are available in 1997. The number of claims received in Canada in February was up 51,000 or 18.6% from January.

There were more claims received in all provinces in February compared with January. The strongest increases were in Alberta (+27.7%) and Manitoba (+22.3%).

Available on CANSIM: tables 276-0001 to 276-0006, 276-0009, 276-0011, 276-0015 and 276-0016.

Definitions, data sources and methods: survey number 2604.

Data tables are also now available online. From the By subject module of our website, choose Labour.

Data on Employment Insurance for March will be released on May 26.

For more information, or to order data, contact Client Services (toll-free 1-866-873-8788; 613-951-4090; labour@statcan.gc.ca). To enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, contact Dominique Pérusse (613-951-4064) or Jane Lin (613-951-9691), Labour Statistics Division.

Table 1

Employment Insurance: Statistics by province and territory
  January 2009p February 2009p January to February 2009 February 2008 to February 2009 January to February 2009 February 2008 to February 2009
  Seasonally adjusted
  number change in number % change
Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits            
Canada 565,810 610,150 44,340 153,730 7.8 33.7
Newfoundland and Labrador 37,130 38,100 970 3,620 2.6 10.5
Prince Edward Island 7,790 7,910 120 310 1.5 4.1
Nova Scotia 29,290 29,950 660 3,130 2.3 11.7
New Brunswick 30,920 32,000 1,080 2,100 3.5 7.0
Quebec 175,920 183,580 7,660 24,780 4.4 15.6
Ontario 184,520 198,880 14,360 74,420 7.8 59.8
Manitoba 11,840 12,180 340 2,420 2.9 24.8
Saskatchewan 9,320 10,000 680 2,200 7.3 28.2
Alberta 24,060 30,630 6,570 14,810 27.3 93.6
British Columbia 57,010 63,650 6,640 25,480 11.6 66.8
Yukon 880 890 10 110 1.1 14.1
Northwest Territories 810 850 40 180 4.9 26.9
Nunavut 430 450 20 140 4.7 45.2
Initial and renewal claims received            
Canada 274,680 325,650 50,970 113,090 18.6 53.2
Newfoundland and Labrador 9,590 10,030 440 1,120 4.6 12.6
Prince Edward Island 2,540 2,550 10 80 0.4 3.2
Nova Scotia 9,740 10,530 790 1,530 8.1 17.0
New Brunswick 9,900 10,650 750 1,210 7.6 12.8
Quebec 73,980 84,110 10,130 17,240 13.7 25.8
Ontario 97,470 109,870 12,400 44,320 12.7 67.6
Manitoba 7,030 8,600 1,570 2,100 22.3 32.3
Saskatchewan 5,840 6,080 240 1,710 4.1 39.1
Alberta 22,240 28,410 6,170 15,860 27.7 126.4
British Columbia 35,780 41,710 5,930 16,900 16.6 68.1
Yukon 310 310 0 10 0.0 3.3
Northwest Territories 330 320 -10 50 -3.0 18.5
Nunavut 220 200 -20 70 -9.1 53.8
preliminary
Note(s):
Number of beneficiaries receiving regular benefits exclude claimants receiving training, job creation and self-employment benefits as well as other employment and support measures benefits.

Table 2

Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by age, sex, province and territories
  February 2008 February 2009p February 2008 to February 2009 February 2008 to February 2009
  Unadjusted for seasonality
  number change in number % change
Canada        
Both sexes 602,510 791,600 189,090 31.4
Under 25 years 67,100 91,550 24,450 36.4
25 to 54 years 426,570 560,150 133,580 31.3
55 years and over 108,840 139,910 31,070 28.5
Men 404,030 552,220 148,190 36.7
Under 25 years 52,310 73,060 20,750 39.7
25 to 54 years 277,280 381,100 103,820 37.4
55 years and over 74,450 98,060 23,610 31.7
Women 198,480 239,380 40,900 20.6
Under 25 years 14,790 18,490 3,700 25.0
25 to 54 years 149,290 179,050 29,760 19.9
55 years and over 34,390 41,850 7,460 21.7
Newfoundland and Labrador        
Both sexes 45,490 49,820 4,330 9.5
Under 25 years 4,360 4,640 280 6.4
25 to 54 years 31,670 34,150 2,480 7.8
55 years and over 9,460 11,030 1,570 16.6
Men 27,710 31,360 3,650 13.2
Women 17,790 18,460 670 3.8
Prince Edward Island        
Both sexes 11,090 11,420 330 3.0
Under 25 years 1,050 1,140 90 8.6
25 to 54 years 7,430 7,500 70 0.9
55 years and over 2,610 2,770 160 6.1
Men 6,770 7,190 420 6.2
Women 4,310 4,220 -90 -2.1
Nova Scotia        
Both sexes 35,680 39,980 4,300 12.1
Under 25 years 3,700 4,420 720 19.5
25 to 54 years 25,160 27,810 2,650 10.5
55 years and over 6,820 7,750 930 13.6
Men 23,180 26,860 3,680 15.9
Women 12,500 13,130 630 5.0
New Brunswick        
Both sexes 41,260 43,700 2,440 5.9
Under 25 years 3,820 4,160 340 8.9
25 to 54 years 29,210 30,270 1,060 3.6
55 years and over 8,230 9,270 1,040 12.6
Men 27,790 30,450 2,660 9.6
Women 13,470 13,250 -220 -1.6
Quebec        
Both sexes 213,540 244,590 31,050 14.5
Under 25 years 25,950 30,520 4,570 17.6
25 to 54 years 149,560 169,470 19,910 13.3
55 years and over 38,040 44,600 6,560 17.2
Men 147,860 173,850 25,990 17.6
Women 65,680 70,740 5,060 7.7
Ontario        
Both sexes 162,280 252,810 90,530 55.8
Under 25 years 18,140 27,310 9,170 50.6
25 to 54 years 118,460 186,600 68,140 57.5
55 years and over 25,670 38,900 13,230 51.5
Men 110,190 178,160 67,970 61.7
Women 52,080 74,650 22,570 43.3
preliminary
Note(s):
Number of beneficiaries receiving regular benefits exclude claimants receiving training, job creation and self-employment benefits as well as other employment and support measures benefits.

Table 3

Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by age, sex, province and territories
  February 2008 February 2009p February 2008 to February 2009 February 2008 to February 2009
  Unadjusted for seasonality
  number change in number % change
Manitoba        
Both sexes 12,680 15,990 3,310 26.1
Under 25 years 1,670 2,270 600 35.9
25 to 54 years 8,700 11,020 2,320 26.7
55 years and over 2,310 2,700 390 16.9
Men 9,390 12,150 2,760 29.4
Women 3,290 3,840 550 16.7
Saskatchewan        
Both sexes 10,830 14,160 3,330 30.7
Under 25 years 1,200 1,690 490 40.8
25 to 54 years 7,240 9,520 2,280 31.5
55 years and over 2,390 2,950 560 23.4
Men 8,020 10,370 2,350 29.3
Women 2,820 3,790 970 34.4
Alberta        
Both sexes 19,180 36,710 17,530 91.4
Under 25 years 2,030 4,670 2,640 130.0
25 to 54 years 13,620 25,940 12,320 90.5
55 years and over 3,530 6,100 2,570 72.8
Men 12,420 25,830 13,410 108.0
Women 6,760 10,880 4,120 60.9
British Columbia        
Both sexes 48,190 79,580 31,390 65.1
Under 25 years 4,970 10,450 5,480 110.3
25 to 54 years 33,820 55,760 21,940 64.9
55 years and over 9,410 13,370 3,960 42.1
Men 29,210 54,070 24,860 85.1
Women 18,980 25,510 6,530 34.4
Yukon        
Both sexes 1,090 1,260 170 15.6
Under 25 years 100 130 30 30.0
25 to 54 years 770 860 90 11.7
55 years and over 230 270 40 17.4
Men 720 860 140 19.4
Women 370 400 30 8.1
Northwest Territories        
Both sexes 720 930 210 29.2
Under 25 years 60 90 30 50.0
25 to 54 years 540 710 170 31.5
55 years and over 120 130 10 8.3
Men 500 660 160 32.0
Women 220 270 50 22.7
Nunavut        
Both sexes 340 510 170 50.0
Under 25 years 40 50 10 25.0
25 to 54 years 270 410 140 51.9
55 years and over 30 50 20 66.7
Men 240 380 140 58.3
Women 100 140 40 40.0
preliminary
Note(s):
Number of beneficiaries receiving regular benefits exclude claimants receiving training, job creation and self-employment benefits as well as other employment and support measures benefits.

Table 4

Beneficiaries receiving regular benefits by census metropolitan areas
  February 2008 February 2009p February 2008 to February 2009 February 2008 to February 2009
  Unadjusted for seasonality
  number change in number % change
Newfoundland and Labrador        
St. John's 5,330 6,030 700 13.1
Nova Scotia        
Halifax 5,290 6,570 1,280 24.2
New Brunswick        
Saint John 2,330 2,560 230 9.9
Quebec        
Saguenay 6,280 6,640 360 5.7
Québec 12,700 15,110 2,410 19.0
Sherbrooke 3,750 4,560 810 21.6
Trois-Rivières 4,380 4,790 410 9.4
Montréal 62,750 74,380 11,630 18.5
Ottawa–Gatineau, Gatineau part 3,780 4,340 560 14.8
Ontario        
Ottawa–Gatineau, Ottawa part 5,980 7,290 1,310 21.9
Kingston 1,540 1,940 400 26.0
Oshawa 5,290 6,470 1,180 22.3
Toronto 54,460 87,440 32,980 60.6
Hamilton 7,270 13,330 6,060 83.4
St. Catharines–Niagara 7,870 10,980 3,110 39.5
Kitchener 5,240 10,270 5,030 96.0
London 5,450 9,970 4,520 82.9
Windsor 5,720 11,660 5,940 103.8
Greater Sudbury 2,470 3,690 1,220 49.4
Thunder Bay 2,540 2,940 400 15.7
Manitoba        
Winnipeg 5,370 7,380 2,010 37.4
Saskatchewan        
Regina 1,220 1,350 130 10.7
Saskatoon 1,510 2,360 850 56.3
Alberta        
Calgary 5,460 11,690 6,230 114.1
Edmonton 5,540 10,880 5,340 96.4
British Columbia        
Abbotsford 2,210 3,380 1,170 52.9
Vancouver 16,290 28,550 12,260 75.3
Victoria 1,870 3,530 1,660 88.8
preliminary
Note(s):
Number of beneficiaries receiving regular benefits excludes claimants receiving training, job creation and self-employment benefits as well as other employment and support measures benefits.