Indigenous Peoples Survey (IPS)

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Step 1: Visit the electronic questionnaire portal and select Start my survey.

Step 2: Enter your secure access code (you will find this code in the invitation letter or email you previously received from Statistics Canada).

Step 3: Complete the survey.

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Phone:

1-877-949-9492
(TTY: 1-800-363-7629)
Monday to Friday (except holidays) from 8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., Eastern time

If you use an operator-assisted relay service, you can call us during regular business hours. You do not need to authorize the operator to contact us.

Email:

 

The Indigenous Peoples Survey (IPS) is a national survey of First Nations people living off reserve, Métis and Inuit living in Canada. The 2022 IPS is a thematic survey with a focus on social and economic outcomes related to education, employment, health and access to services. It will continue to collect important information concerning Indigenous people such as language, harvesting, handcrafting and cultural activities, housing and mobility.

The IPS informs policy and programming activities that are aimed at improving the well-being of Indigenous peoples and is an important source of information for a variety of stakeholders including Indigenous organizations, communities, service providers, researchers, governments and the general public.

Your information may also be used by Statistics Canada for other statistical and research purposes. In addition, information from partially completed or unsaved questionnaires may be retained and used.

Collection periods:
From May 11 to October 31, 2022
Collection methods:
Electronic questionnaire and telephone interview
Survey participation:
Voluntary
  • Block Information Confidentiality

    Confidentiality

    Data are collected under the authority of the Statistics Act, Revised Statutes of Canada, 1985, Chapter S-19. Your information will be kept strictly confidential.

  • Block Information on Data sharing agreements and record linkage

    Data sharing agreements and record linkage

    Data sharing agreements

    Statistics Canada has entered into data-sharing agreements with provincial and territorial statistical agencies and other government organizations, which have agreed to keep the data confidential and use them only for statistical purposes. Statistics Canada will only share data from this survey with those organizations that have demonstrated a requirement to use the data.

    Section 12 of the Statistics Act provides for the sharing of information with federal, provincial or territorial government organizations.

    For this survey, there are Section 12 agreements with the Inuvialuit Regional Corporation, Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated, Nunatsiavut Government, Makivik Corporation, and Nunavut Bureau of Statistics.

    Statistics Canada will only share your survey responses with your consent. Your name or other personal identifiers will not be shared.

    Record linkage

    In order to reduce the number of questions, Statistics Canada plans to combine information collected during the 2021 Census to the information you provide during the interview. We may also add information from other surveys or administrative data sources.

    Also, no information collected during the 2021 Census of Population, other surveys or administrative data sources will be shared.

  • Block Information on Topics covered in the survey

    Topics covered in the survey

    General topics covered in the 2022 Indigenous Peoples Survey include

    • access to services
    • child care
    • family stability
    • trauma and discrimination
    • economic well-being
    • physical and mental health
    • education
    • sense of belonging and Indigenous languages and culture.
  • Block Information on Published data

    Published data

    Statistics Canada publishes the results of its surveys in many formats. To find all the documents related to this survey, follow the links below and type the name of the survey in the search engine located at the left of your screen to filter the results.

    Data: You will find tables, profiles of a community or region, thematic maps, public use microdata files, and data visualization tools

    Analysis: You will have direct access to Stats in brief (e.g., releases from The Daily, fact sheets), articles and reports, and journals and periodicals.

    Statistics on Indigenous peoples: data and analysis on Indigenous peoples in Canada.

  • Block Information on Survey-specific questions

    Survey-specific questions

    What is the Indigenous Peoples Survey?

    The Indigenous Peoples Survey (IPS) is a national survey of First Nations people living off reserve, Métis and Inuit living in Canada. The 2022 IPS is a thematic survey with a focus on social and economic outcomes related to education, employment, health and access to services. Similar to previous cycles (the last one conducted in 2017), the survey will also collect important information about language, harvesting, handcrafting and cultural activities, housing and mobility.

    The IPS was formerly called the Aboriginal Peoples Survey. For the 2022 cycle, the name has been updated to the Indigenous Peoples Survey. "Indigenous" is a collective term used to encompass a variety of original peoples of North America and their descendants. The term "Indigenous" is increasingly replacing the term "Aboriginal", in response to calls from within Indigenous communities. Following consultations with Indigenous communities and organizations, Statistics Canada has adopted the term "Indigenous" to refer to First Nations people, Métis and Inuit.

    What is the IPS – Nunavut Inuit Supplement?

    The 2022 Indigenous Peoples Survey will include a supplementary set of questions, known as the Nunavut Inuit Supplement, for a large supplemental sample of Inuit aged 15 and older who are enrolled under or are beneficiaries of the Nunavut Agreement. These questions were developed in partnership with Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated, the Government of Nunavut (GN), Pilimmaksaivik, and Employment and Social Development Canada. The questions were designed to assess the availability, interest and preparedness of Inuit for government employment in Nunavut, and to eventually increase their representation in government. 

    Where and how will the survey be conducted?

    The 2022 Indigenous Peoples Survey is conducted with the Indigenous population of Canada living in private dwellings off reserve and excludes people living on Indian reserves and settlements and in certain First Nations communities in Yukon and the Northwest Territories. These exclusions were made to avoid overlap with the survey being conducted by the First Nations Information Governance Centre.

    Individuals selected for the survey will be asked to complete the questionnaire online using a secure access code sent in the mail. A smaller sample of interviews will be conducted by telephone. In some areas, and in compliance with current public health guidelines, respondents may also be visited by interviewers in-person to have their contact information verified and updated and to schedule an interview. The interviews will then be done by telephone on the scheduled day.

    Why are you not surveying on reserve?

    A survey of First Nations people living on reserve and in northern First Nations communities will be conducted by the First Nations Information Governance Centre. For more information, please see the Indigenous Services Canada website.

    How many people will be contacted to participate in the survey?

    Approximately 74,000 First Nations people living off reserve, Métis and Inuit will be contacted.

    Who is sponsoring this survey?

    The Indigenous Peoples Survey (IPS) is funded by three federal departments: Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada, Indigenous Services Canada and Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC). The IPS – Nunavut Inuit Supplement (IPS-NIS) is funded by ESDC. Both surveys are conducted by Statistics Canada.

    How long does the survey take to complete?

    The time required to complete the survey varies from person to person. The survey may take up to an hour to finish, but it does not need to be fully completed in one sitting. The questionnaire can be saved at intervals, and multiple telephone interviews can be scheduled, as needed.

    When will the results for this survey be available?

    It is anticipated that the results of the survey will be available in the spring of 2024.

    Why is the Indigenous Peoples Survey important? What type of questions will the survey ask?

    The Indigenous Peoples Survey (IPS) is used to support policy and programming activities for a wide range of stakeholders, including Indigenous organizations, communities and governments. For Inuit enrolled under the Nunavut Agreement, survey results will also be used to help find ways to increase Inuit employment in government, as required by Article 23 of the Nunavut Agreement. The Nunavut Inuit Labour Force Analysis, in consultation with Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated and the Government of Nunavut will then assist in the development of effective Inuit employment and pre-employment training strategies.

    The 2022 IPS will ask questions on social and economic outcomes of First Nations people living off reserve, Métis and Inuit. With your help, information will be collected on subjects such as:

    • access to services
    • child care
    • family stability
    • trauma and discrimination
    • economic well-being
    • physical and mental health
    • education
    • sense of belonging and Indigenous languages and culture.

    The IPS – Nunavut Supplement will ask questions about

    • trust in public institutions
    • availability and interest in government employment
    • previous experience with government employment
    • interest in training and mobility for government employment
    • plans to apply for government work
    • plans for further education, and pre-employment training
    • skills, training and relevant experiences
    • language fluency for work
    • plans for retirement.

    Are children asked any questions?

    The survey population includes young children aged 1 to 5, children aged 6 to 14, and adults aged 15 and older. Children will not be asked to complete the survey themselves. Instead, we will ask a parent, guardian or person most knowledgeable about the child to complete the survey for children under 15.

    I don't want to use the Internet for this. Is there another way to answer the questionnaire?

    Yes. To complete the survey over the phone, contact us at 1-833-977-8287, or wait for a Statistics Canada interviewer to contact you.

    How will you safeguard the confidentiality of my information?

    As with all Statistics Canada surveys, any information you provide will remain confidential pursuant to the Statistics Act.

    Statistics Canada takes the privacy of Canadians very seriously. Published data can never identify you or your household.

    To find out more about the measures in place to safeguard the confidentiality of your information, visit Statistics Canada's Trust Centre.

    How was I (my child) chosen for this survey? How did you get my (my child's) name, address and phone number?

    Someone from your household completed the 2021 Census of Population for Statistics Canada. Your name or your child's name was randomly chosen from a list of all individuals across Canada who identified themselves in the Census as an Indigenous person, or as having Indigenous ancestry. The 2022 Indigenous Peoples Survey (IPS) contains questions for young children aged 1 to 5, children aged 6 to 14, and adults aged 15 and over.

    In order to facilitate other survey work and research, Statistics Canada uses information from the Census to contact survey respondents. The confidentiality provisions under the law apply to all surveys undertaken by Statistics Canada. This means that no information published from the IPS will identify individual respondents.

    Will you use my name? Will my name be put on a mailing list?

    No. All personal information such as names and addresses will be separated from survey answers. Names and addresses are only used to contact people for follow-up. No information will be published that could allow an individual to be identified. Statistics Canada may use personal identifiers for internal linkage purposes. For example, we may combine your data from this survey with that from the 2021 Census. Personal identifiers will be removed once data linkage is done. Please note that only aggregated statistical data will be released and no information will be published that could identify an individual or household.

    How do I know this call is really from Statistics Canada? Where do I call for more information about the survey?

    You can call 1-877-949-9492 to confirm that you are speaking to a Statistics Canada interviewer. You can also visit the Information for survey participants website to see a list of current surveys in collection and obtain more information about our survey collection procedures, including how to verify the legitimacy of a phone call or visit.

    Why should I answer questions that I feel are too personal or an invasion of my privacy?

    We realize that some questions are personal, but keep in mind that we get many answers from many people. These answers are grouped together and used to produce overall statistics. It will not be possible to identify any of your responses in the materials released to the public.

    Am I obligated to take part in the survey?

    While your participation is voluntary, you have been selected to represent a number of other individuals with similar characteristics. To ensure that all individuals are represented, it is necessary that we interview all people selected. Therefore, your participation is very important.

    It would be very expensive to survey every Indigenous person in Canada, so we only collect information from a sample of people. This means that the information you provide will represent not only you but hundreds of other people similar to you.

    I just did a similar survey. Why are you contacting me again?

    There are a number of surveys being conducted by Statistics Canada at any given time. Every effort has been made to prevent overlap between surveys. However, it is possible that you have been selected for more than one survey. Each of the surveys have their own objectives, and relate to different aspects of life in Canada.

    As an example, the Indigenous Peoples Survey (IPS) is different from the Census of Population. While the Census gathers broad demographic information on every person living in Canada, the IPS looks at information that is specific to the needs of First Nations people living off reserve, Métis and Inuit.

    Why do you need this information? Could it not be obtained from other sources?

    The Indigenous Peoples Survey (IPS) is a unique survey dedicated to obtaining information about the demographic, social and economic characteristics of Indigenous populations in Canada. The 2022 IPS will collect information that is not available elsewhere and will complement the 2021 Census of Population.

    Why does the Indigenous Peoples Survey use the terminology "First Nations (North American Indian)"?

    Statistics Canada has engaged in regional discussions and extensive questionnaire testing with respondents, data users and members of Indigenous communities and organizations across Canada concerning the appropriate terminology to use when identifying and publishing data for First Nations people in Canada. Although a number of participants have indicated a preference for "First Nations" over "North American Indian", this opinion is not unanimous and many have suggested using both terms.

    Do I require an official certificate to declare myself as a member of a First Nation? Do I require an official certificate to declare myself as a Status Indian?

    For the purposes of this survey, you do not require an official certificate to say you are a member of a First Nation or a Status Indian.

    Can I include more than one Indigenous identity on my questionnaire?

    Yes, you can include multiple Indigenous identities (First Nations, Métis, Inuit) on the questionnaire, if applicable.

    I have Indigenous ancestry, but I don't consider myself Indigenous. I don't think I should be included in this survey.

    Respondents for the Indigenous Peoples Survey are chosen from a list of all individuals across Canada who identified themselves as an Indigenous person or as having Indigenous ancestry in the 2021 Census. Your answers will determine which questions you are asked throughout the survey.

    Who was involved in designing the questionnaire? Are Indigenous people involved in the survey development?

    The 2022 Indigenous People Survey (IPS) was created with input from the Federal Funding partners Indigenous Services Canada and Employment and Social Development Canada. The 2022 IPS contains many questions that are similar to previous cycles of the IPS, which were carried forward to maintain data comparability over time.

    The 2022 IPS Nunavut Inuit Supplement questions were developed by a consultation group which included representatives from Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated, the Government of Nunavut, Pilimmaksaivik, Employment and Social Development Canada, and Statistics Canada.

    During survey development, the questionnaire was also tested with First Nations people, Métis and Inuit across Canada. Whenever possible, Indigenous people have been hired and trained as interviewers and for other survey-related positions. Statistics Canada's Indigenous Liaison Advisors are part of the promotional and dissemination activities relating to the IPS, and Statistics Canada will also work with National Indigenous Organizations on these activities.

    Will the data be available to Indigenous people?

    Yes. National Indigenous Organizations (NIOs) will be given up to 500 hours each for Statistics Canada to provide data tables according to their data needs. A Statistics Canada analyst has been assigned to work with each NIO. In addition, Statistics Canada will publish highlights of the results on our website.

    Does the IPS follow principles of Ownership, Control, Access and Possession like First Nations Information Governance Centre surveys?

    According to the First Nations Information Governance Centre, the Ownership, Control, Access and Possession (OCAP™) principles are a set of standards that establish how First Nations data should be collected, protected, used, or shared.

    Both Statistics Canada and OCAP™ hold the shared belief of the importance of high-quality information. Statistics Canada places a high priority on collaborating with others, including other federal departments, other levels of governments and the many institutions that benefit from high quality statistical information. Whenever possible, Statistics Canada aims to collaborate and engage with Indigenous organizations. Through our Indigenous Liaison Program, we assist in building statistical capacity in Indigenous institutions and communities. By doing so, Statistics Canada aims to contribute to community empowerment, improve data quality, accuracy and relevance for Indigenous communities, promote coherent analyses, minimize biases and assist communities in research and data collection.

    Under the Statistics Act, Statistics Canada has the authority to collect and obtain information from Canadians and is obligated to protect the confidentiality of respondents. Statistics Canada acts as stewards of the data on behalf of all Canadians, including Indigenous peoples. The 2022 Indigenous Peoples Survey, like all surveys at Statistics Canada, follows the Statistics Act which ensures the highest standards of confidentiality in our data storage. To find out more about the measures in place to safeguard the confidentiality of your information, visit Statistics Canada's Trust Centre.

  • Block Information on The Indigenous Peoples Survey Supporter Toolkit

    The Indigenous Peoples Survey Supporter Toolkit

    The Indigenous Peoples Survey Supporter Toolkit contains products and resources to help you and your organization spread the word about the importance of the Indigenous Peoples Survey for your community.

  • Block Information on Other information: list of resources for respondents

    Other information: list of resources for respondents

    Some of the content of this survey may elicit upsetting memories of stressful or traumatic events you have experienced, which may cause stress or discomfort

    Should you need any support, the following resources may be helpful.

    Helplines – Mental health services

    Hope for Wellness Help Line (24 hrs - 7 days a week)
    1-855-242-3310
    Hope for wellness helpline
    Phone and chat counselling is available in English and French. On request, phone counselling is also available in Cree, Ojibway or Inuktitut

    Wellness Together Canada - Mental Health and Substance Use Support (24 hrs - 7 days a week)
    (Adults) Text WELLNESS to 741741
    (Youth) Text WELLNESS to 686868
    (To help you support someone in distress) 1-866-585-0445
    Wellness Together Canada

    Canada Suicide Prevention Service (24 hrs - 7 days a week)
    1-833-456-4566
    Canada Suicide Prevention Service

    National Indian Residential School Crisis Line for Residential School survivors and family (24 hrs - 7 days a week)
    1-866-925-4419
    (Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program)

    Support line for those affected by missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls
    1-844-413-6649

    Long term health support services for survivors, family members and those affected by the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls

    • Atlantic: 1-866-414-811
    • Quebec: 1-877-583-2965
    • Ontario: 1-888-301-6426
    • Manitoba: 1-866-818-3505
    • Saskatchewan: 1-866-250-1529
    • Alberta: 1-888-495-6588
    • Northwest Territories, Nunavut, and Yukon: 1-866-509-1769
    • British Columbia: 1-877-477-0775

    Helplines – Victim services by province or territory

    Victim services directory:
    Victim services directory

    Kids Help Phone
    1-800-668-6868
    Kids Help Phone

    Newfoundland and Labrador - Victim services

    Mental Health Crisis Line (24 hrs - 7 days a week)
    1-888-737-4668
    811 HealthLine

    Department of Justice - Victim Services
    (709) 729-7970
    Victim Services

    Department of Justice - Victim Services (St. John's)
    (709) 729-0900
    Victim Services

    Prince Edward Island - Victim services

    Island Helpline (24 hrs a day- 7 days a week)
    1-800-218-2885
    Island Helpline

    Charlottetown (Queens and Kings County)
    Victim's services HQ PEI Department of Justice and Public Safety
    (902) 368-4582

    Summerside (Prince County)
    Victim's services HQ PEI Department of Justice and Public Safety
    (902) 888-8217 or (902) 888-8218

    Nova Scotia - Victim services

    Victim Services Head Office
    1-888-470-0773
    Department of Justice Victim Services

    Halifax, Dartmouth and Halifax County
    Victim Services Dartmouth Regional Office
    (902) 424 -3307

    Annapolis, Kings, Haunts, Lunenburg, Queens, Shelburne, Yarmouth, Digby Counties
    Victim Services Kentville Regional Office
    1-800-565-1805

    Pictou, Guyborough, Antigonish, Colchester, Cumberland Counties
    Victim Services New Glasgow Regional Office
    1-800-565-7912

    Cape Breton, Richmond, Inverness, Victoria Counties
    Victim Services Sydney Regional Office
    1-800-565-0071

    New Brunswick - Victim services

    Chimo Helpline (24 hrs - 7 days a week)
    1-800-667-5005
    Chimo Helpline

    Fredericton
    Chimo Helpline (24 hrs - 7 days a week)
    (506) 450-4357
    Chimo Helpline

    Quebec - Victim services

    CAVAC (Crime Victims Assistance Centre)
    1-866-532-2822
    Crime Victims Assistance Centre

    SOS Domestic Violence (24 hrs)
    1-800-363-9010
    SOS Domestic Violence

    Tel-jeunes (Youth from 5 to 20 years old)
    1-800-263-2266
    Tel-jeunes

    Ontario - Victim services

    Victim Support Line (8 am to 10 pm - 7 days a week)
    1-888-579-2888

    Assaulted Women's Helpline (24 hrs - 7 days a week)
    1-866-863-0511
    Assaulted Women's Helpline

    Toronto
    Victim Support Line (8 am to 10 pm - 7 days a week)
    (416) 314-2447

    Assaulted Women's Helpline (24 hrs - 7 days a week)
    (416) 863- 0511
    Assaulted Women's Helpline

    TTY
    Assaulted Women's Helpline (24 hrs - 7 days a week)
    1-866-863-7868
    Assaulted Women's Helpline

    Manitoba - Victim services

    Manitoba Organization for Victim Assistance (MOVA)
    1-877-596-0095 or (204) 831-8950
    Manitoba Organization for Victim Assistance (MOVA)

    Klinic Crisis Line (24 hrs - 7 days a week)
    1-888-322-3019
    Klinic Crisis Line

    Winnipeg
    Klinic Crisis Line (24 hrs - 7 days a week)
    (204) 786-8686
    Klinic Crisis Line

    Victim et Witness Assistance Program
    1-866-635-1111

    Saskatchewan - Victim Services

    Government of Saskatchewan - Victim Services Branch (Regina)
    1-888-286-6664 or (306) 787-3500

    TTY
    Government of Saskatchewan - Justice: Victims of Crime and Abuse
    1-866-445-8857

    Alberta - Victim Services

    Alberta Solicitor General (Toll Free for calls from Alberta)
    310-0000
    Ministry of Justice and Solicitor General

    Family Violence Information Line (24 hour toll free)
    310-1818
    Abuse and bullying

    British Columbia - Victim services

    Victim Link (24 hours)
    1-800-563-0808
    VictimLinkBC

    CVAP (Crime Victim Assistance Program)
    Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General (MPSSG)
    1-866-660-3888

    Helpline for Children
    310-1234 or 1-800-663-9122
    Reporting Child Abuse in BC

    Vancouver
    Victim Services Unit - Vancouver Police Department
    (604) 717-2737
    Vancouver Police Department

    Yukon - Victim services

    Victim Link (24 hours)
    1-800-563-0808
    Find out about Victim Services

    Yukon Department of Justice - Victim Services
    1-800-661-0408 or (867) 667-8500
    Yukon Department of Justice

    Northwest Territories - Victim services

    Helpline Western Arctic (General Help - 7 pm to 11 pm)
    1-800-661-0844

    Fort Smith
    Fort Smith Victim Services (9 am to 5 pm)
    1-867-872-3520

    Beaufort Delta Region -Aklavik, Fort McPherson, Holman, Inuvik, Paulatuk, Sachs Harbour, Tsiigehtchic, Tuktoyaktuk, Ulukhaktok
    Inuvik Victim Services (9 am to 5 pm)
    1-867-777-5493 or (867) 678-5493 1-867-777-5493 or (867) 678-5493

    NWT (Northwest Territories) Helpline
    1-800-661-0844
    NWT Help Line

    Sahtu Region - Colville Lake, Fort Good Hope, Norman Wells, and Tulita
    Fort Good Hope Victim Services (9 am to 5 pm)
    1-867- 598-2247

    Dehcho Region - Fort Liard, Fort Simpson, Jean Marie River, Nahanni Butte, Trout Lake, and Wrigley
    Fort Simpson Victim Services (9 am to 5 pm)
    1-867-695-3136

    North Slave Region- Dettah, Lutselk'e N'Dilo, and Yellowknife
    Yellowknife Victim Services (9 am to 5 pm)
    1-867-920-2978

    Nunavut - Victim services

    Rankin Inlet
    Pulaarvik Kablu Friendship Centre
    1-867-645-2600
    Pulaarvik Kablu Friendship Centre

    Nunavut Ramatsiqtut Helpline
    1-800-265-3333
    Nunavut Ramatsiqtut Helpline

    RCMP (Royal Canadian Mounted Police) Crisis Line
    1-867-982-0123

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